Bears

Miller: Can the Bears trust Brandon Marshall?

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Miller: Can the Bears trust Brandon Marshall?

Trust me, as a former player it's hard writing an article defending new Bears'No. 1wide receiver Brandon Marshall. Everybody trusts the talent, but do you trust the individual? Do you want Marshalls abbreviated or elongated wrap sheet?Ill surmise: He was arrestedsix times, admitted mental disorder (borderline personality disorder) and was subsequently accused of battery coinciding atrade to the Bears via the Miami Dolphins.Whats not to love? Marshall seems like a great guy. Can the Bears Trust Him?Its always dicey making deals with the devil but Im sure one Bear stuck his neck out to vouch for Marshall: It would be their starting quarterback Jay Cutler.Their history is well documented with the Broncos. Marshall averaged 92 receptionsper year and over 1,000 yardsper season when they played together. Its not happenstance those records occurred just because theyre both talented, but rather their relationship is much deeper.BondsWhen you get drafted together like Cutler (first round) and Marshall (fourth round) were in 2006 by the Broncos, bonds are created. They are created every year between all draft picks of every team. Draft picks decide amongst themselves who has the heart, passion, desire and skill required to achieve the task at hand. Earlier draft picks with higher investment have the edge, but all draft picks are trying to accomplish the same goal and dream, which is to make the team and play in the NFL. Speed DatingCutler and Marshall observed early on they were special. They excelled when other draft picks faltered. Talent was the common thread but they both recognized and respected their discussions about the desire to be great, working hard at their craft in order to be special in the NFL. Its just what winners do. Its called Backing it up."Is there a trusted Doctors diagnosis for this disease in modern medicine and is the desire to be great Illegal? Cutler has not been arrested like Marshall but he has been handcuffed in a parallel universe known as the Bears' pass game since his arrival. Prescribed medication maybe the key, but I think two guys who trust each other will live up to their bond as rookies.No meds needed. The Bears will be just fine when it comes to trusting Marshall. Just look at the facts. Marshall has to play nice due to the legalbattles. Hehas no wiggle room at all in 2012, considering how he arrived to the Bears.Sweat EquityCutler and Marshall have a ton of sweat equity together with the Broncos. Trust me, trust is not an issue.

Are expectations too high for Bears WR Allen Robinson?

Are expectations too high for Bears WR Allen Robinson?

Allen Robinson was signed in free agency to become the alpha dog of the Chicago Bears' wide receiver corps. The three-year, $42 million contract that general manager Ryan Pace signed him to is proof of how high expectations are for the fifth-year pro.

Robinson isn't coming to Chicago with a flawless resume, however. His massive breakout year in 2015 (1,400 yards, 14 touchdowns) was followed by a pedestrian 883 yards in 2016 and a torn ACL in Week 1 last year. That begs the question: Is the forecast for Robinson's impact in 2018 too high right now?

According to Bleacher Report's Doug Farrar, the answer is yes. Robinson was named as the Bear most likely to disappoint this season.

Robinson practiced for the first time since the injury during the Bears' May minicamp, but it's safe to say Chicago isn't sure what it has in Robinson. If he gets back to his 2015 numbers, that would be huge for the Bears' passing offense, but given his 2016 regression and the specter of the 2017 injury, that's a tough bet.

Robinson will have an impact that goes beyond the traditional box score, and it will happen this season. Is he a lock to reach 1,000 yards and double-digit touchdowns? No, but his presence on the field will be enough to see a return on investment. The Bears haven't had the kind of threat he poses to defenses in several seasons, and his ability to pull a defensive coordinator's attention away from the running game will do wonders for Chicago's offensive output.

Determining whether Robinson is a disappointment in 2018 will depend on who's evaluating his season. Sure, he may disappoint in fantasy football circles if he doesn't re-emerge as a game-changing stat monster. But if he makes the Bears offense a more well-rounded and productive group, he'll live up to the expectations set by Pace and coach Matt Nagy.

As long as Robinson is pleasing Pace and Nagy, nothing else really matters.

Mitch Trubisky jersey sales trending in right direction

Mitch Trubisky jersey sales trending in right direction

Positive press about the Chicago Bears' offseason is having a strong impact on the jersey sales for the team's highest-profile player, Mitch Trubisky.

According to Dick's Sporting Goods, Trubisky's No. 10 is the fifth-most popular jersey among offensive players over the last 30 days. He's No. 6 among all players, regardless of position.

The Bears' offseason has been full of superlatives since their aggressive approach to free agency. The signings of Allen Robinson, Trey Burton and Taylor Gabriel put the spotlight on Trubisky and the potentially surging passing game. The second-round selection of Anthony Miller and word of Kevin White's offseason emergence has turned positive momentum into higher-than-anticipated expectations for Trubisky this season.

For Chicago to have any chance at meeting those expectations, Trubisky, who's entering his first full season as a starter with a new head coach and offensive system, has to thrive. Fans must be confident that he will, considering the investment they're making in his jersey.

Trubisky ended his rookie season with four wins in 12 starts, throwing for 2,193 yards with seven touchdowns and seven interceptions. He completed 59.4 percent of his passes. He should have a much more productive season in 2018 with his new arsenal of skill players and an innovative coaching staff, led by coach Matt Nagy and offensive coordinator Mark Helfrich.