Bears

Moon Musings from a Sunday of NFL football

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Moon Musings from a Sunday of NFL football

Sunday, Dec. 19, 2010
10:45 PM

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

The play of Matt Flynn for the Green Bay Packers should serve to quiet some of the snickering about the Bears facing backup quarterbacks (which has happened a lot this season).

Flynn started in place of concussed Aaron Rodgers and had the New England Patriots reeling right up to the final, game-ending sack. Rodgers doesnt make some of the new-guy mistakes but Flynn played better against the Patriots that Jay Cutler, Mark Sanchez and a lot of other quarterbacks this season.

A fluke? Well, Drew Stanton, that third-stringer who started against the Bears, guided the Detroit Lions to a road win over playoff-hopeful Tampa Bay earlier in the day and beat the Packers with Rodgers a week earlier.

Look, no one is saying that backups are the players that starters usually are. But would the Bears have lost to the Miami if the Dolphins had Chad Henne or Pennington starting instead of Tyler Thigpen? Or to Detroit if Matthew Stafford is in rather than Stanton? Lovie Smth has virtually owned (8-3) Brett Favre, and Tarvaris Jackson iswell, Tarvaris Jackson. Can Joe Webb really do all that much worse?

Remember those guys?

Not that the Bears or anyone else is looking that far back and it doesnt mean anything now, but what the Philadelphia Eagles did with their comeback against the New York Giants puts a subtle exclamation point to the Bears win over Philly a few weeks back. It also did the Bears a little favor that could turn out to be very big.

If the Bears and Eagles tie as division winners (assuming the Bears get their business done in short order), the Bears have the head-to-head edge over Philadelphia and that could get them a bye past the wild-card round. The division winners with the two best records get that first week off; one of those two will be the Atlanta Falcons and the other could ultimately be determined by those 28 points in the final 7:28 by the Eagles in the Meadowlands.

Jet takeoff?

A less helpful (for the Bears) turn of events was taking place in Pittsburgh where the recently inept New York Jets were taking the measure of the Steelers. The Jets had a total of three field goals in the combined previous two games and the Bears would like very much to have been playing a collapsing team on a three-game losing streak.

What raises an eyebrow is the fact that the Jets did it on the road, against the fourth-ranked yardage defense. The Jets also are now 6-1 on the road as they get ready for Soldier Field.

Detroit doins

The Detroit Lions are starting to play the way I thought they would all season after all the upgrading they did in the offseason. Its just a little late.

They put a significant scare into the Bears with that 17-14 halftime lead two weeks ago. Then, off a losing streak at five games, they rocked the Green Bay Packers and didnt allow at TD. Now they average 6.5 yards per carry and run for 181 yards against what appeared to be a playoff team at Tampa Bay. Operative phrase: at Tampa Bay.

This was the first road win since they beat the Bears in 2007.

So the Lions have defeated two teams with winning records in the last two weeks and threatened a third (Chicago). Early prediction: The Lions will not finish fourth in the NFC North next year.

Nice call

Compliments to Jeff Fisher for his presenting offensive coordinator Mike Heimerdinger a game ball after the Tennessee Titans defeated the Houston Texans. Heimerdinger is battling cancer and Fishers gesture was one of those moments that helps you remember that there are battles in life far greater and with more at stake than a football game. Nice going, Guppy, and good luck, Mike.

Sound of silence
With the Bears playing on Monday night, we wont have our regular Monday night chat on CSNChicago.com from 7-8 p.m. Those are always a good time and right now well figure on hooking up Tuesday night instead of Monday.

Same on checking in with the guys at WFMB-AM SportsRadio 1450 in Springfield. We usually visit in drive time at 4:40 p.m. but well gab Tuesday instead. Other get-togethers right now will stay the same this week.

And one more thing

Ive had the Bears at 10-6 or better for this season and this will be No. 10. I had thought the upset of the New England Patriots would be that onenever mind.

But this time for sure.

The Vikings lost the Leslie Frazier buzz last week in that showing against the New York Giants in Detroit. Theyre honoring their 50 greatest players and coaches this weekend but since Chuck Foreman, Alan Page and Fran Tarkenton are in their primes or suiting up, thats just good for a brief emotional tick. Hey, the Bears retired the uniform numbers of none other than Dick Butkus and Gale Sayers in 1994 and lost by 27, at home.

Minnesota is starting a rookie quarterback against a defense that has been roughed up the past two weeks. Joe Webb will give the Bears more problems than they would like, and the Bears could be in serious trouble if they prepared sloppily the way the Patriots did for Matt Flynn when the Packers came to Foxboro on Sunday night.

But while conditions should affect the dome-based Vikings more than the Bears, the biggest issue I see for the Bears to overcome is Jay Cutler. The quarterback simply does not characteristically play well in the dark, as the Giants, Dolphins and Patriots game confirmed. Even his play in the win over Green Bay produced a lower passer rating than his season average.

Turnovers will decide the game and if Cutler can avoid them, the Bears should post win No. 10 and pick up their third NFC North title in Lovie Smiths seven Chicago seasons.

Bears 13 Vikings 10

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Why coming to the Bears was the right opportunity for Harry Hiestand to leave Notre Dame

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AP

Why coming to the Bears was the right opportunity for Harry Hiestand to leave Notre Dame

There wasn’t a single game Harry Hiestand coached while at Notre Dame — 77 in total — in which he didn’t have a future top-20 pick starting at left tackle. 

Zack Martin (16th overall, 2014) was followed by Ronnie Stanley (6th overall, 2016), who gave way to Mike McGlinchey (9th overall, 2018). Hiestand also developed Quenton Nelson, who went on to be the highest interior offensive lineman drafted (6th overall, 2018) since 1986. Nelson and McGlinchey became the first pair of college offensive line teammates to be drafted in the first 10 picks since 1991, when Tennessee had tackles Charles McRae and Antone Davis go seventh and eighth. 

“It wasn’t surprising because the kind of guys they are, they absolutely did everything the right way, the way they took care of themselves, the way they trained, the teammates that they are and were,” Hiestand said. “They just did it all the way you wanted them to do it. So it was. It was a good moment.”

Hiestand said he had a sense of pride after seeing his two former players be drafted so high, even if he wasn't able to re-unite with either of them. The Bears, of course, didn’t have a chance to draft Nelson, and had conviction on using the eighth overall pick on linebacker Roquan Smith (as well as having tackles Charles Leno and Bobby Massie in place for the 2018 season). 

Anecdotally, one former Notre Dame player said (maybe half-jokingly) that Nelson and McGlinchey were fighting each other to see who could get drafted by the Bears to play with Hiestand again.

“There’s nobody that I’ve been around in this game that’s more passionate about what he does,” McGlinchey, now with the San Francisco 49ers, said of Hiestand at Notre Dame’s pro day in March. “There’s really only two things that are important to him, and that’s his family and then his offensive linemen. There’s a lot to be said for that. 

“In this game, everybody’s always trying to work an angle to up their own career — he doesn’t want to do anything but coach O-line, and that’s what really sticks out to us as players. He cares for us like we’re his own. Obviously he coaches extremely hard and is very demanding of his players, which I loved — he pushed me to be the player that I am.

“I’m standing in front of all you guys because of Harry Hiestand. But the amount of passion and care that he has not only for his job but his teaching abilities and his players is what sets him apart.”

Hiestand could’ve stayed as long as he wanted at Notre Dame, presumably, given how much success he had recruiting and developing players there. But six years at one spot is a long time for a position coach, especially at the college level, where the grind of recruiting is so vital to the success of a program. It’s also not like every one of the blue-chip prospects Hiestand recruited to South Bend panned out, either. 

So Hiestand knew he wanted to get back to the NFL after coaching with the Bears under Lovie Smith from 2005-2009. It’s a new challenge for him now, not only to develop second-round pick James Daniels but to continue the growth of Cody Whitehair and Leno while getting the most out of Kyle Long, Massie and the rest of the group (back during his first stint with the Bears, Hiestand had the luxury of coaching experienced, more ready-made offensive lines). 

As one of the more highly-regarded offensive line coaches in the country, though, Hiestand could’ve jumped back into the NFL whenever, and nearly wherever, he wanted. And for him, coming back to the Bears was the perfect fit. 

“That’s an awesome, awesome place, a great franchise,” Hiestand said. “It was something, I always wanted to go back, I didn’t know where I would get the opportunity. So I’m just very fortunate it just happened to be back at the same place that I was before. There are a lot of things that are different but there’s also a lot that’s the same. 

“But it’s one of the — it is the greatest organization. Historically, this is where it all began, and being part of it — and the other thing, and I told those guys when I got here, when we get it done here, you guys are going to see this city like you’ve never seen it. And I remember that. That’s what we’re after.” 

On a scale of 1-10, Tarik Cohen says his dangerous level is 12

On a scale of 1-10, Tarik Cohen says his dangerous level is 12

Don't be fooled by Tarik Cohen's height. He has towering confidence and he's setting up to have a big role in coach Matt Nagy's offense in 2018.

“On a scale of 1-10, the dangerous level is probably 12,” Cohen said Wednesday at Halas Hall about the impact he can have in the Bears' new system. “Because in backyard football, it’s really anything goes, and it’s really whoever gets tired first, that’s who’s going to lose. I’m running around pretty good out here, so I feel like I’m doing a good job.”

Cohen proved last season he can thrive in space. He made an impact as a runner, receiver and return man and will have a chance at an even bigger workload this fall, assuming he can handle it.

With Jordan Howard established as the starting running back, Cohen knows his touches will come in a variety of ways.

“It might not necessarily be rushes,” he said. “But it’s going to be all over the field, and that’s what I like to do. Any way I can get the ball or make a play for my team, that’s what I’m looking forward to doing.”

Cohen averaged 4.3 yards-per-carry as a rookie and led all NFL running backs in the percentage of carries that went for at least 15 yards. He's a big play waiting to happen.