Bears

Nathan Enderle draft capsule

Nathan Enderle draft capsule

Nathan Enderle, Quarterback
Height: 6-4 Weight: 240 College: Idaho
What they say about Enderle
CBSSports.com

Overview

Not many quarterbacks would earn a third year as a starter after his team went 3-21 in his first two seasons.

Idaho coaches actually brought in junior college transfer Brian Reader to compete with Enderle before the 2009 season, and Reader led the Vandals to a win over San Jose State after Enderle threw interceptions on consecutive drives. But the team stuck with the Nebraska native through the rest of the season, and the Vandals finished with a winning record (7-5) and won the Humanitarian Bowl - their first postseason appearance in 11 years.

Enderle finished high school early, but still redshirted in 2006. He earned the starting position as a redshirt freshman, and the Vandals went through growing pains with him (44.3 percent completions, 10 touchdowns, 18 interceptions).

Improvement was evident in 2008, as he completed 54.3 percent of his passes for 2,077 yards and 20 scores, but he still threw 17 picks. His maturation continued in 2009 as he completed 61.5 percent of his passes, threw for 2,906 yards and connected for 22 touchdowns against only nine interceptions.

Analysis
Accuracy: Has improved his accuracy each season, does a good job generally getting the ball where it needs to go. Can thread the needle between defensive backs over the middle. Good touch and trajectory on fade patterns in the end zone and on the sideline, puts ball where only receiver can find it. Not deadly accurate on short timing throws, however, often forcing his receivers to go low or wide. Inconsistent on purposely-thrown balls behind his receiver, will get them too close to the defender at times. Can be forced into interceptions when under pressure.

Arm Strength: Only an average arm, but still could succeed in the NFL in a patient offense staying with short and intermediate throws. Adept at making quick decisions to unload the ball. Makes shorter throws while being wrapped up by defenders or slinging the ball out under pressure, but also forces some throws in that situation. Willing to throw passes down the seam or in tight spaces, though his arm is not strong enough to beat defenders to the spot if he doesn't see them closing; this leads to interceptions. Deep ball will float, especially when his feet are not set.
SetupRelease: Looks like an NFL pocket passer. Stands tall and unloads the ball relatively quickly, with only a minor wind-up. Delivers the ball knowing he's about to take a hit. Can throw at different angles if needed. Works primarily from under center but will line up in the shotgun. Carries the ball a bit low and loose at times, defenders can easily swat it out of his hands. Must improve his footwork; takes extra steps in his drop, will jump back before planting. Regularly pats the ball before throwing. Unnecessarily stands flat-footed to throw some passes.

Reading Defenses: Long-time starter in a quasi-pro style offense, who has earned the ability to change protections and plays at the line of scrimmage. Will check down to safety valve if first option is covered. Needs to sell the ball fake more aggressively to freeze linebackers and safeties. Feels pressure well, sometimes too well; his feet get a bit happy if running out of time. Will force throws into coverage both because he doesn't see defenders and because he tries to make plays that aren't there.

On the Move: Good internal clock, counts to three and gets out of the pocket. Able to complete passes running to his left or right. Mobile enough to step up or to either side, reset, and find a target downfield. Lacks speed to break off long runs, will get a few yards if stepping up into a vacated area. Inconsistent tucking the ball away if feeling pressure and unable to throw.

Intangibles: Battle-tested, four-year starter who has seen great highs and lows during his career - and matured through the process. Honor student who graduated early from high school to attend Idaho.
Sideline Scouting

Positives: Good accuracy within short areas, can hit his receivers in stride... Quick feet, gets adequate depth in his drop steps... Intelligent, has a very high football IQ... Calls many of Idaho's plays at the line of scrimmage... Does a good job making pre-snap reads and adjustments at the line of scrimmage... Good at avoiding the blitz by stepping up into the pocket... Does a good job working the middle of the field with quick, accurate, strikes... Prototypical height and frame for an NFL quarterback... Played in a pro-style offense, knows how to take snaps under center... Should have a short learning curve in the NFL.

Negatives: Just average arm strength, looks like he'd throw harder than he does... Has some issues when throwing the deep out, defenders are able to jump on some of his throws... Struggles against top competition... In five games against BCS schools, he completed 51 percent of his passes for an average of 165 yards per game and threw only four touchdowns to 13 interceptions... Long throwing motion... Tips some of his passes off by patting the ball before he throws... Doesn't always take a stride while throwing which causes some passes to sail on him... Throws too many interceptions, needs to cut down on mental errors... Trusts his arm far too much, tries to make throws that he has no business making... Has a hard time picking up disguised blitzes and coverages... Not a great runner, is more of a pocket passer... Really a poor athlete.
Pro Football Weekly

Notes: Also played basketball and baseball and ran track as a Nebraska prep. Graduated high school early to enroll at Idaho and redshirted in 2006. Stepped into the lineup in 07 when he started all 10 games in which he played and completed 132-of-298 pass attempts (44.3 percent) for 1,787 yards with 10 touchdowns and 18 interceptions. Missed three games after rupturing a tendon in his right (throwing) hand against Hawaii. Started all 12 games in 08, tossing 184-339-2,077-20-17 (54.3). In 09, started all 11 games in which he played and completed 192-312-2,906-22-9 (61.5). Suffered a right (throwing) rotator cuff tear against Louisiana Tech and missed two games. Started all 13 games in 10 and totaled 271-478-3,314-22-16 (56.7). Team captain. Had a 17-29 career starting record. Graduated in December.

Positives: Looks the part. Outstanding size and arm strength to drive the ball into tight spaces. Extremely intelligent and has a strong understanding of the game set protection and was given reign to heavily audible at the line. Works and practices hard. Very experienced, pro-style passer. Has physical tools to develop.

Negatives: Too analytical on the field overthinks the game and lacks the innate instincts desired to become a decisive triggerman. Average poise and processing speed in the pocket holds on to the ball too long and takes needless sacks. Tends to set tall and narrow-based and footwork requires refinement. Not quick-footed to escape the rush marginal scrambling ability. Struggles to take pace off the ball and throw with touch does not toss a catchable ball. Crumbled against better competition (Nebraska, Boise State). Has a 54.6 percent career completion percentage and a 37 percent winning percentage, and it shows. Marginal weight-room worker and strength. Lacks mental toughness, confidence and the command to take charge in an NFL locker room.

Summary: A well-built, pocket-passing, four-year starter who still makes too many freshman mistakes. Looks the part on paper, but enters the NFL as very much a project with a long way to go. Has the size and arm strength to fit best into a vertical passing game, but heavy feet, inconsistent accuracy and raw decision making might keep him holding a clipboard for the next 10 years. Most comfortable when he is not on the hot seat.

NFL projection: Fifth- to sixth-round pick.

Bears Season in Review: Adam Shaheen

Bears Season in Review: Adam Shaheen

The Chicago Bears 2019 season was a lesson in disappointment in almost every way possible, from the quarterback to the offensive line and even the vaunted pass rush. But no position underwhelmed more than tight end, and Adam Shaheen was a big reason why.

The former second-round pick of the 2017 NFL draft failed to make any impact whatsoever. And that's not hyperbole. He appeared in just eight games, registering nine catches for 74 yards and zero touchdowns. Believe it or not, his stat line was an improvement over 2018 when he had just five catches for 48 yards in six games.

Shaheen's career narrative has been defined by injury, and it continued last season. He was placed on injured reserve in late-November with an apparent foot injury, marking the second-straight season that his year came to an early end.

It's been a remarkably disappointing career for Shaheen so far, who was viewed as a Rob Gronkowski-lite coming out of Ashland University. His jump from the small-school ranks to the NFL was expected to include a steep learning curve, but after three forgettable seasons, it's safe to say Shaheen's failed in almost every way possible.

The Bears are expected to bring Shaheen back for 2020 and he'll likely be in a training-camp battle for a roster spot. Chicago is going to add more talent to the position via either free agency or the NFL Draft and it wouldn't be a surprise if Shaheen begins the offseason schedule last on the depth chart.

It's been an unfortunate outcome for a draft pick that seemed so promising in 2017. Instead of growing into a fixture in the Bears' lineup, Shaheen will be left to fight for his NFL future this summer.

Kirk Cousins on John DeFilippo: 'He’s going to add a lot to Bears' staff'

Kirk Cousins on John DeFilippo: 'He’s going to add a lot to Bears' staff'

Minnesota Vikings quarterback Kirk Cousins spoke with Chicago Sun-Times reporter Patrick Finley at the 2020 Pro Bowl and offered a glowing review of Bears quarterback coach, John DeFilippo, whose addition to Chicago's coaching staff is expected to bring the best out of Mitch Trubisky, the Bears' incumbent starter who's entering a make-or-break offseason with the team.

“He’ll be outstanding,” Cousins said. “He’s a great coach. He’s been around this league for a long time. I think it says a lot when someone like Matt Nagy, who knows quarterbacks so well, hires him. I think that says a lot about ‘Flip.’

“When you look at what he did with Carson Wentz as a young player, I think there’s a lot to like there. And he’s going to add a lot to that staff. It’s going to be to my detriment, because we’re in his division. But he’s a great coach.”

DeFilippo was the Eagles quarterback coach for two seasons (2016-17) and played an integral part in Wentz's development between his rookie and second seasons. Under DeFilippo's tutelage, Wentz went from a solid rookie season to an MVP-worthy campaign in 2017. It's also noteworthy that DeFilippo managed to get the best out of veteran Nick Foles, who replaced Wentz after a season-ending injury. Foles went on to enjoy a miraculous Super Bowl run.

DeFilippo certainly has his work cut out for him with Trubisky. The former second-overall pick has looked like an average starter (at best) through 41 regular-season starts and regressed mightily in 2019. Blame for his regression has been shared among the offensive line and play-calling, but he deserves much of the criticism too. His mechanics were sloppy, his accuracy was lacking and he just didn't play with the kind of downfield killer instinct Nagy wants from his starter.

Nagy's end-of-year comments about Trubisky needing to learn how to identify coverages didn't create much confidence in his near-term trajectory, either.

But that's why DeFilippo is in town. And if Cousins' comments prove to be true, then we may be on the precipice of a breakout season from Trubisky.

Or maybe DeFilippo will be the tie-breaking voice that allows the Bears to move on if Trubisky's struggles continue.