Bears

NFL Draft Profile: Florida State C Cameron Erving

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NFL Draft Profile: Florida State C Cameron Erving

As part of our coverage leading up to the 2015 NFL Draft we will provide profiles of 200 prospects, including what the scouts around the league are saying and video interviews with each player.

Cameron Erving (C), Florida State

6’5” | 313 lbs.

Selection:

1st round, No. 19 overall (Cleveland Browns)

What scouts are saying:

"Versatile athlete with blend of size, athleticism, length, light feet and flexibility. Toughness, aggressive and works to finish opponents with strong hands and impressive natural power in his lower half. Easily reaches and dominates at the second level. Pulls smoothly, showing impressive initial quickness and acceleration for a man his size. Equally effective sealing off defensive tackles at center or mirroring pass rushers as a left tackle. Smooth athleticism in his kick-step to handle speed off the edge. Strong hands to latch on and control the opponent. Plays with proper knee-bend to win leverage battle." - Rob Rang & Derek Stephens, CBSSports.com

"Keeps busy and works to secure blocks in run game. Good foot quickness into pass set. Consistently in ready position with good hand readiness in pass sets. Uses good hand placement and has natural timing with hands. Converted defensive tackle who will continue to improve in the NFL with more experience at center. Displays good snap-to-step quickness. Uses quickness to attack defender and begin his grind much earlier than when he played tackle. Competes and is a willing learner. Can get to second level and make cut-off blocks. Has athleticism to pull and offers versatility along the line." - Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

"Could be a more consistent technician. Gets by on tremendous athletic ability. Footwork can be sloppy in pass protection and he bends the waist to catch the rush instead of absorbing with his lower half. When engaged tries to win with his upper body rather than his lateral swiftness. Aggression can work against him. Fails to adjust when blocking on the move when not focused. Most weaknesses are correctable with NFL coaching." - Rob Rang & Derek Stephens, CBSSports.com

Video analysis provided by NBC Sports and Rotoworld NFL Draft expert Josh Norris.

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Bears vs. Redskins: Case Keenum confident Washington will 'move the ball and score touchdowns'

Bears vs. Redskins: Case Keenum confident Washington will 'move the ball and score touchdowns'

The Chicago Bears are entering Week 3's Monday night game against the Washington Redskins with a defense that, to no one's surprise, is ranked among the NFL's elite once again.

New defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano hasn't missed a beat in 2019. The Bears are ranked fourth in total yards allowed per game and are sixth against the run. They've been getting to the quarterback, too, ranking sixth in total sacks through two games.

So, yeah, the Redskins offense has their work cut out for them. Washington's starting QB Case Keenum knows how good the Bears defense is, but remains confident.

"Well they do a lot of stuff well, they’re ranked pretty high in a lot of categories," Keenum said of Chicago's defense Wednesday. "Up-front, obviously, with the guy they got last year in that trade, it makes them, it brings them to a whole other level, up-front I think we got our work cut out for us.

"They’ve got a lot of depth, a lot of experience on the back end, some guys who’ve played together a long time. I know they got a new defensive coordinator, but they got a lot of experience playing together, so their communication skills, as far as making the right checks and stuff, they do a good job of disguising a lot of stuff, so recognizing coverages, recognizing fronts, and then knowing our plan to attack those is gonna be key."

The Redskins played better than expected over the last two weeks against opponents who also feature strong defenses. Despite sitting at 0-2, Washington played both the Eagles and Cowboys tough.

"I don’t know if there’s anything we take away from them being great defenses," Keenum said of the Redskins' early-season opponents. "We’re confident, whoever we play, we’re gonna line up and move the ball and go score touchdowns. Everybody in this league is really good, and we got our work cut out for us again, I wouldn’t have it any other way."

Keenum is off to a hot start in 2019 and will challenge the Bears' secondary, maybe even more than most fans are expecting right now. He's completed 69 percent of his passes for 601 yards, five touchdowns and zero interceptions so far this year, numbers that look more like what Chicago was hoping for from Mitch Trubisky than what was projected for a journeyman like Keenum.

As defending NFC North champs, the Bears are embracing all that comes with the national spotlight

As defending NFC North champs, the Bears are embracing all that comes with the national spotlight

When the Bears head to D.C. next Monday, it'll be their second nationally-televised game in three weeks. It's not dissimilar from 2018's start, when they started with back-to-back Sunday nights: first in Green Bay (remember?!) and then the home opener vs. Seattle. 

Last year, that Seahawks game would be the last nationally-viewed Bears game until they played in Detroit on Thanksgiving almost two months later. Flexed Sunday night games against the Rams and in Minnesota made it 4 on the season. 

Things are a bit different this season. As it stands today, the Bears are scheduled to be on national broadcasts five more times this year, and seven times on the season.  Two weeks after D.C. they'll be in London against the Raiders, and then have Sunday night games against the Rams, Cowboys, and Chiefs. Throw in another noon Thanksgiving kickoff in Detroit and that's a whole lot of exposure. 

"Bring the prime time, bring the prime time," linebacker Danny Trevathan said. "That’s what we strive for, that’s what we wanted. Coach talked about being 100… that’s prime time." 

There have been a lot of night games in the Matt Nagy era, a testament to how quickly he brought the franchise back into the national conversation. It's not without it's cons, but that many late kickoffs means you're doing something well. 

"There’s a little bit more attitude when you’re playing on Thursday night, Sunday night, Monday night," said Allen Robinson. "You know the whole world is watching – there’s only one game on at that time." 

"Everybody’s watching," Trevathan added. "And it’s a chance for us to go ahead and play our type of ball, come away with a dub, and put it on for the whole world to see."