Bears

Random News Of The Day: Super Bowl Ads

Random News Of The Day: Super Bowl Ads

Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011
10:00 p.m.

By Joe Collins
CSNChicago.com

I was going to write a Super Bowl commercial pieceand it almost got completely derailed once the National Anthem started. Not so much because Christina Aguilera botched the lyrics, but because of this: is it me or does she look like an early-90s version of Cyndi Lauper? Or maybe Snookis long-lost cousin? I had 3-4 paragraphs written on the topic before she finished the song. Oh well, maybe that column will have to come another day.

Anyway

Super Bowl commercials are almost as big as the game itself. If you have ever thrown a party for the big game, there is always that guy that watches the game just for the commercials. Yes, Im that guy. Without the Bears to get excited (or freaked out) about, I had no emotional interest in the game itself. The time would much rather be served by taking in some advertising Americana. After all, these things help keep the economy rolling along, right? These are my five best and worstcommercials seen between 5:00pm CT and the time our beloved northern friends hoisted the Vince Lombardi trophy:
THE FIVE BEST:

--DORITOS FINGER LICKING:

Much like Mother Nature did last week, Doritos simply dominated. Their Pug ad was pretty good, but the Finger Licking ad was one of the best. An office worker gets bummed out after his coworker eats all of the Doritos. So what does he do? He licks the residue off his fingers. Later, another coworker wipes the Doritos residue on the side of his pants and...you can fill in the blank from there. Hey, it doesnt hurt to be a little creepy in commercials, as long as you dont push the envelope too far.

--CHRYSLERIMPORTED FROM DETROIT:

Eminem appeared in two spots in Super Bowl XLV. The first one was by Brisk, featuring the rhyming Eight Mile-er in Claymation. This second one by Chrysler was pretty slick. It featured a remixed Lose Yourself as a backdrop. The driver cruises past various sites in Detroit: The Joe Louis Fist, The Fox Theateretc. Its a bit long 2:00but they got it right with Eminem. Kid Rock and Bob Seger couldnt pull that off.

--DORITOSHOUSE SITTING:

Doritos had three commercials air in the first quarter. The House Sitting one rivaled the Finger Licker. A house sitter notices that the owners fish has gone belly up. He springs him back to life by throwing a few chips into the bowl. He then accidentally knocks over an urn (containing grandpas ashes), spilling the contents all over the floor. Like the fish, the old codger comes back to life thanks to the magical power of, you guessed it, the triangular corn chip.

--VOLKSWAGEN THE FORCE:

Pint-sized Darth Vader uses The Force on things around the house: the washerdryer, the family dog, a doll and his fathers Volkswagen Passat. But the Passat has a surprise for the young Vader, thanks to an assist from Dad. Worth a chuckle.

--BRIDGESTONE REPLY ALL:

Nothing says fun like accidentally hitting reply all on an office email. One guy figures that out the hard way. He goes on an adventure with help from Bridgestone Tiresto try and stop the message from reaching the unintended targets.

Note: The Budweiser Tiny Dancer one just missed the cut.

THE FIVE WORST:

--PEPSI LOVE HURTS:

I thought it was a pretty mediocre Super Bowl year for Pepsi commercials. This particular commercial and the Pepsi Max Can To The Groin spot were tepid at best. Pepsi did have a decent showing on the Blind Date spot, where the girl is internally over-analyzing about the guy shes withand the guy just wants, well, the obvious. Then, he gets distracted by a Pepsi Max and all he wants is that. Meh.

--COKE THE SEIGE

Much like the Black Eyed Peas halftime show, this spot was overproduced and bloated. Cokes Border commercial made up for this one a little bit, where one guardsman alters the border of his country to give his neighbor a drink.

--BEST BUY OZZY OSBOURNE & JUSTIN BIEBER:

There are only two people in the world who, no matter what they say, will be funny: Mike Tyson and Christopher Walken. Ozzy Osbourne is a close third. Unfortunately, he doesnt get much to say here. No memorable lines. Justin Bieber didnt add much either. The space age backdrop didnt make it for me. Too busy and confusing.

-- POPCORN:

Not really sure what the advertisement was for (I didnt see any specific popcorn corporate logos or anything), but they showed a bunch of guys watching the Super Bowl from the high roller suites. Then they showed Cameron Diaz feeding Alex Rodriguez and it-- -errr uhm. Oh wait. That wasnt a commericial.

--GO DADDY JOAN RIVERS:

Having Danica Patrick seduce mass audience is one thing. But Joan Rivers? Really?

What do you think? What were your top five? Or bottom five?

At the very least, we can hope the Bears are in the Super Bowl next year. We wouldnt have to analyze the commercials that much.

Or something like that.

3 things 2020 Bears will need to repeat 2018’s success

3 things 2020 Bears will need to repeat 2018’s success

The first two years of the Matt Nagy era can be boiled down to this: First, a tremendously fun year in which the Bears blew past expectations; and second, a tremendously un-fun year in which the Bears fell short of expectations.

So what will 2020 be closer to: The unbridled joy of 2018 (until the last kick of the wild card round), or the numbing disappointment of 2019 (despite still winning eight games)?

To answer that question, we should start by laying out some expectations for 2020. Broadly: The Bears should compete for a spot in an expanded seven-team playoff field. More narrowly: The Bears’ offense should be, at worst, league-average – about where it was in 2018. And the defense, led by a mauling pass rush, should be one of the best in the NFL even without Eddie Goldman.

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But how do the Bears get 2020 to feel more like 2018 than 2019? Here are three key factors:

The tight end question

Trey Burton did not miss a game in 2018’s regular season, and the Bears’ offense was better because of it. While Burton’s numbers weren’t eye-popping (54 catches, 569 yards, 6 TDs) his steadiness at the “U” tight end spot allowed the Bears’ offense to create mismatches, especially with Tarik Cohen.

Burton never was healthy last year, playing poorly in eight games before landing on injured reserve. The Bears didn’t have quality depth behind Burton, and the “Y” spot was a disaster. The lack of any good tight end play wasn’t the only reason why the Bears’ offense cratered in 2019, but it might’ve been the biggest reason.

The starting point to the Bears’ offense in 2020 is, certainly, figuring out who’s playing quarterback. But the Bears need Jimmy Graham, Cole Kmet and Demetrius Harris to be the fixes their tight end room sorely needs. Just average play from those guys will help the Bears’ offense be closer to what it was in 2018 (which, again, was merely good enough), if not better.

MORE: Where Cole Kmet stands as Bears get to know their rookies

And if the tight end room is a disaster again? It might not matter who starts at quarterback.

Good luck and/or good depth

The 2018 Bears were incredibly lucky in dodging significant injuries early on. Adam Shaheen began the year on IR but returned in November; Kyle Long went on IR after Week 8 and came back Week 17. Depth pieces like Sam Acho and Dion Sims were lost, sure, but the Bears did well to make their absences footnotes to the season.

Even when slot corner Bryce Callahan was injured in Week 14, veteran special teamer Sherrick McManis did incredibly well in his place. Eddie Jackson’s season-ending injury in Week 15 was the most costly, as the Bears missed him in that wild card game against Foles and the Eagles.

But overall, the Bears were both lucky in terms of staying healthy and good in terms of replacing those injured guys in 2018.

The Bears saw some depth shine in 2019 – specifically defensive lineman Nick Williams and inside linebacker Nick Kwiatkoski – but even still, the defense struggled to dominate without Hicks on the field. And the aforementioned tight end position was a disaster without a healthy Burton. Long never was right, and the offensive line without him (or veteran backup Ted Larsen) never was either. Taylor Gabriel’s off-and-on availability due to multiple concussions hampered the offense, too.

2020 inevitably will be a year of attrition not only for the Bears, but for the entire NFL. In addition to avoiding football injuries before and during the season, teams will have to avoid COVID-19 outbreaks in their facilities. Training and personal responsibility can go a long way in avoiding injuries and illness, but it’ll take a lot of luck, too, for teams to stay mostly healthy.

MORE: Fragility of 2020 season constantly on Bears players' minds

The teams with the best depth will have the best chance of making the playoffs. Will the Bears be among that group? Maybe. But a shortage of draft picks in recent years might be costly. We’ll see.

Betting on pressure

The Bears had one of the best defenses of the last decade in 2018 because of, first and foremost, outstanding coverage from its secondary. The ability of Fuller/Jackson/Callahan/Adrian Amos/Prince Amukamara to disguise their coverages confused most opposing offenses, who by the way also had to deal with Hicks pushing the pocket and Mack marauding off the edge. Hicks and Goldman opened up gaps for Danny Trevathan and Roquan Smith to snuff out any attempt at establishing the run. It was a perfect formula.

The 2019 Bears’ defense took a step back not only because Vic Fangio (and defensive backs coach Ed Donatell) left for Denver, but because of player attrition, too. Last year’s defense was good, but not great.

The formula for the 2020 Bears’ defense won’t be the same as it was in 2018, though. The signing of Robert Quinn, coupled with jettisoning Leonard Floyd, hints at a defense predicated on a dominant pass rush. Holes in the secondary were addressed on the cheap, be it with Jaylon Johnson or Tashaun Gipson.

That’s not necessarily a bad thing. A trio of Mack/Hicks/Quinn seems impossible to contain. If the Bears’ defense re-emerges as one of the best in the NFL, it’ll be because those three guys lead the way in putting pressure on opposing quarterbacks.  

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Mtich Trubisky, of course, was dubbed Bears' biggest liability in 2020

Mtich Trubisky, of course, was dubbed Bears' biggest liability in 2020

Mitch Trubisky's tenure in Chicago since being the second overall pick of the 2017 NFL draft hasn't been great. It hasn't been terrible, either. It's been a blend of good and bad which has led to an incomplete picture of who he is as a quarterback entering his fourth year in the league. It's the main reason why the Bears traded for Nick Foles; Trubisky can't be trusted (yet) to be the unquestioned starter for a team that on paper has playoff potential.

The fact that Trubisky can't be trusted contributes to the narrative that he's the team's biggest liability. Even if he wins the Bears' quarterback competition, will he really have the unconditional confidence of his coaches and teammates? Will Bears fans have the kind of faith in Trubisky that fans of other contenders have in their quarterbacks? Probably not. There's no reason why they should. Trubisky hasn't been consistent enough through nearly three seasons as a starter to deserve that level of trust.

According to a recent breakdown of every team's biggest liability, it was Trubisky, of course, who took the title for the Bears.

If new Chicago Bears quarterback Nick Foles can beat out Mitchell Trubisky and play well in 2020, the Bears might be a playoff team. If he cannot, Chicago might be looking at a lost season.

While the Bears roster is very talented, Trubisky has been anything but a steady presence under center. He has struggled to push the ball down the field—he averaged just 6.1 yards per attempt in 2019—and has limited what head coach Matt Nagy is able—or perhaps, willing—to do on offense.

Chicago ranked 29th in passing yardage last year and declined Trubisky's fifth-year option this offseason.

If the Bears are again one-dimensional, they're going to find it difficult to be relevant in the tough NFC North.

I ran a poll on Twitter that asked Bears fans who they prefer as the starting quarterback with just over one month to go before the season kicks off. The results were predictably close, but the nod went to Foles (56%). It feels safe to assume a big reason why fans hope Foles ends up QB1 is because of his proven track record in big moments. Even if he's a boring player with a limited regular-season ceiling, he has ice in his veins during the game's biggest moments. He's steady. He's consistent. He's pretty much the anti-Trubisky.

Is it fair to say Trubisky is a liability? Of course, it is. If he fails, the Bears will be set back for several seasons. Even if Foles salvages the team's short-term outlook, the long-term success of the franchise depends on Trubisky living up to his scouting report and becoming a franchise quarterback. And there just isn't enough evidence to prove he's capable of doing that.

If we don't know by now whether Trubisky can turn the corner and be a top-tier starting quarterback in the NFL, it's probably safe to say he can't. 

 

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