Bears

Presented By Mullin
Bears

INDIANAPOLIS – The Bears have nearly a dozen scenarios under study for addressing their quarterback situation in 2017 and beyond. An assumption has been that none of those include Jay Cutler.
 
Mmm, maybe...maybe not.
 
General manager Ryan Pace has talked candidly with Cutler's agent, Bus Cook, and has informed Cook and Cutler that efforts would be made to deal the veteran quarterback, according to various sources. But one reality is that Cutler is currently the only quarterback under an actual contract, and whether for negotiating purposes or whatever, the Bears have not ruled Cutler out for 2017.
 
"Yeah, that's one of the options, too," Pace confirmed on Wednesday at the outset of the NFL Scouting Combine. "At this point we pretty much have everything on the table. For us, to do it the responsible way, that's necessary."
 
Right now the Bears are perusing a fairly large "table," and even the Cutler option isn't a fully known commodity, given that he is still recovering from a torn labrum that ended his 2016 season.
 
Brian Hoyer is considered to have an inside track on the starting job by virtue of coaches thoroughly appreciating a quarterback who practices ball security. Hoyer has a career interception percentage of 2.2 and threw zero interceptions in 200 attempts last season before breaking his left arm in Green Bay.
 
In the process he earned perhaps the single most important, and glowing, endorsement outside of the front office.
 
"Brian's unique in that he makes very quick decisions," said coach John Fox. "He's very smart, been in a lot of different systems. He's been on the field a lot in the NFL. I thought he did a good job. He didn't have an interception on the season, which for the number of passes he threw, I think probably ranked No. 1."
 
After Cutler's promising 2015 season working under Adam Gase, Fox praised Cutler as one of the main surprises in his first year as Bears coach. The specifics of Fox's praise of Hoyer offer a tip as to his thinking now – defense-based coaches commonly want to adopt ball-security quarterbacks – but he did not speak of Cutler solely in the past tense.
 
After two years of Cutler, "I think the perception in the building may be a little different than outside from what I've gathered," Fox said. "But I think he's very smart; he's a very tough competitor. I think he's had to deal with some injuries; unfortunately, they're part of football. But he's bounced back quickly from all the ones we've experienced in the last two years. But I think the competitive nature of Jay, I've been very impressed with."