Bears

Tice as offensive coordinator a risky call

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Tice as offensive coordinator a risky call

Now that it looks like Mike Tice will have total control of the Bears offense and the plays that are called, it brings up an interesting debate. Why did the Bears decide against a passing game coordinator, especially when Tice has never been involved in previous NFL passing games?

Let's be clear, if you think calling plays is about picking a call off a play sheet, you are wrong. Dead wrong.

A good coordinator or play caller is as valuable or more than a head coach, hence the seven figure annual salaries most coordinators are hauling in these days.

A good coordinator in the NFL MUST have a great feel for the passing game. We can all call runs to the right, and runs to the left.

Designing a passing attack and knowing when to call the plays is an art. There is a reason some guys remain coordinators for several years in the league and others are one and done guys or never get the chance.

Play design: knowing the looks your offense will get in each area and situation on the field, coming out of end zone, middle of field, red zone and goal line.

That includes what look you get from each hash mark and with the ball in middle of the field. How do they lineup against each personnel group that you use? What coverages do you get in each area of field against those personnel groupings? (Groupings are the five guys outside of offensive line and QB since they are on field for every play, such as: 2 RB, 2 WR, 1 TE -- or 3 WR, 2 TE -- or 4 WR, 1 RB etc...)

Now what play will work against any anticipated look? Will you get straight man, zone or a combo coverage or one of any other hundred looks? Are you trying to pull a linebacker over to open a zone, run guys across field to beat man, use play action to open area between backers and safeties, pull a safety out of hole, create a high low read on the corner (if corner drops deep, you throw to flat, if corner sits on flat you throw behind him)?

Knowing how to beat coverages and anticipating when to call plays is something that is learned. Sometimes you call a play early in a game against a certain formation just to see the look you will get. Later in the game, you remember the look (coverage) and call a play that you know should beat it. Understanding how to set up plays is what good coordinators can do. They beat you in a chess game.

The Bears are betting Mike Tice can win in the chess game, even though it's not how he made his name as a coach. It's worth pointing out most offensive coordinators have served as quarterbacks or receivers coaches because they are the two positions that are heavily involved in the passing game and understand coverages and play design.

It's not to say what the Bears are doing won't work, but it's certainly a risky road to travel.

Controversial calls played a large part in the Detroit Lions NFC North loss on Monday night

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USA TODAY

Controversial calls played a large part in the Detroit Lions NFC North loss on Monday night

The Green Bay Packers managed to pull off a dramatic comeback victory on Monday night, defeating the Detroit Lions 23-22 on a last-second field goal from Mason Crosby. But after the game, it wasn't Aaron Rodgers usual clutch ways that people were talking about, it was the officiating crew, who had two controversial hands to the face penalty calls against the Lions that all but killed any momentum they had going. 

As you can see in the clip above, both hands to the face calls seemed questionable at best, and downright ludicrous at worst. What makes the calls so tough is the timing. The first hands to the face penalty on Lions DE Trey Flowers came after he sacked Rodgers on third-and-10 and the penalty both took away the sack and provided the Pack with an automatic first down. Later in the drive, Rodgers dropped in a great 35-yard touchdown pass to bring Green Bay within two points 

The second questionable hands to the face call came on third-and-4 and it was the most costly call of the game. The Packers received another automatic first down and ran down the clock—Detroit was out of timeouts—to set up the eventual game-winning, walk-off field goal from Crosby. 

And it didn't take long for many people, everyone from former NFL greats to NFL reporters, to chime in on social media with their thoughts on the officiating that seemingly cost Detroit a crucial win. 

With the Green Bay win, the Lions moved to last-place in the NFC North, while the Bears now sit 2.5 games back of first place heading into their Week 7 matchup against the New Orleans Saints.

NFC North Standings: Bears 2.5 games behind Packers entering Week 7

NFC North Standings: Bears 2.5 games behind Packers entering Week 7

The Green Bay Packers and quarterback Aaron Rodgers pulled off another incredible (or maybe controversial) victory over the Detroit Lions in Monday night's NFC North slugfest, 23-22, to advance to 5-1 and in sole possession of first place in the NFC North.

It was the worst possible outcome for the Chicago Bears, who could've used a little help from the Lions to keep pace with Green Bay entering Week 7.

Instead, the Bears (3-2) are now 2.5 games behind the Packers ahead of their showdown with the New Orleans Saints Sunday at Soldier Field.

It could be worse for Chicago. Detroit's loss drops their record to 2-2-1 on the season and moves them into the division's cellar. Meanwhile, the Minnesota Vikings had arguably their strongest showing of the season in their 38-20 victory over the Eagles and improved to 4-2 on the year. Their four wins slot them ahead of the Bears for second place in the North even though Chicago currently owns the head-to-head tiebreaker.

Here are the NFC North standings heading into Week 7:

1) Packers (5-1)
2) Vikings (4-2)
3) Bears (3-2)
4) Lions (2-2-1)