Bears

Trestman should be a serious candidate for Bears

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Trestman should be a serious candidate for Bears

The coaching career of Marc Trestman deserves a look from Phil Emery because its littered with success. Born just north in the land of 10,000 lakes, Trestman has served as head coach of the CFLs Montreal Alouettes the last five seasons while taking part in the cottage industry of preparing quarterbacks for the NFL Draft.

He taps into his great understanding of the position as Trestman played quarterback for the University of Minnesota Gophers before transferring his senior year to Minnesota State University Moorhead.

MOON: Thoughts on Dennison, Trestman and why no Lovie?

Timing more than anything else, has been Trestmans biggest nemesis in the NFL, not his ability to coach. Everywhere Trestman has been hired to correct offensive issues, the head coach was fired. Through his travels, Trestman has tutored some of the NFLs greatest quarterbacks like Bernie Kozar, Steve Young and Rich Gannon.

Trestman even brought productivity to average quarterbacks like the Lions' Scott Mitchell who threw for 3,500 yards under Trestmans guidance or rookie quarterbacks like Arizona Cardinals' Jake Plummer, who burst onto the scene under Trestman.

For good measure, Treastman was so fed up with the NFL he went to Canada to finally call his own shots as head coach of the Montreal Allouettes, who have three Grey Cup Championship appearances in Treastmans five seasons.

Treastmans Allouettes have won two of those three Grey Cup Championships plus his quarterback Anthony Calvillo won back to back CFL MVP awards during the process.

Many who do not know, will downplay the CFL claiming it is not NFL caliber. Its simply not true because at the end of the day, its still football. Six-time NFL Executive of the Year Bill Polian spent time in the CFL winning Grey Cups also.

If anything, it improves Trestmans resume, as he is a championship head coach who can build a team while being heavily involved in the decision making process of a winning organization. Furthermore, for Trestman to adapt to the CFL style of play under a different set of rules is impressive.

These are all strengths for Trestman, not weaknesses. Plus two of Trestmans pre-draft protoges were on the Bears' roster at the end of the season. Both Jay Cutler and Jason Campbell utilized Trestman during pre-draft workouts before both were selected in the first round of the annual NFL Draft.

Lastly, I talked with one of Trestmans former quarterbacks, Gannon, who spent two stints with Trestman during his NFL career. One stop was in Minnesota, where Gannon spent two years with Trestman stating, "It was young in Trestmans career where he did not have the ability to be more hands on. He couldnt call the shots."

The other stop was in Oakland, where Gannon went on to win the NFL MVP award while the Raiders marched to a Super Bowl appearance against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Trestman was seasoned at this point in his coaching career from all of his prior coaching stops. Gannons analysis of Treastman was glowing when he said, He was smart, innovative, quarterback friendly and pass protection-conscious.

In summation, Treastman is a serious contender to be the Bears' next head coach. Gannons last statement alone will perk up many Bears fans, when pass protection is mentioned as a priority.

Treastman is an quality coach who should be coaching in the NFL, but as many know, timing is everything and it has not been in Treastmans favor. He has worked well with every quarterback hes coached and productivity has followed.

Lastly, Treastman may even be able to work his own contract as hes been a member of the Florida Bar since 1983 when he graduated from the Miami School of Law while coaching Bernie Kozar and the Hurricanes to the National Championship.

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell releases statement on death of George Floyd

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USA TODAY

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell releases statement on death of George Floyd

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell released a statement Saturday evening regarding the tragic death of George Floyd.

"The NFL family is greatly saddened by the tragic events across our country," Goodell's statement reads. "The protesters' reactions to these incidents reflect the pain, anger and frustration that so many of us feel.

"Our deepest condolences go out to the family of Mr. George Floyd and to those who have lost loved ones, including the families of Ms. Breonna Taylor in Louisville, and Mr. Ahmaud Arbery, the cousin of Tracy Walker of the Detroit Lions."

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As protests break out nationwide, Goodell said "there remains much more to do as a country and league," to combat racial inequality.

"These tragedies inform the NFL's commitment and our ongoing efforts. There remains an urgent need for action," he said. "We recognize the power of our platform in communities and as part of the fabric of American society. We embrace that responsibility and are committed to continuing the important work to address these systemic issues together with our players, clubs and partners."

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Leadership lessons Ryan Pace learned from time with Sean Payton, Saints

Leadership lessons Ryan Pace learned from time with Sean Payton, Saints

Every organization in the NFL is working hard to adapt their workflows while under COVID-19 restrictions. Rookie minicamps have already been missed. Organizations are still unable to meet as a full team, and that’s obviously a challenge. But Bears GM Ryan Pace may have a leg up due to the lessons he learned while working in the New Orleans Saints’ front office.

Pace joined Mike Florio on Pro Football Talk’s podcast “PFT PM” to explain exactly how that time in New Orleans helped to shape him as a leader, both in “normal” times and times of crisis.

“There’s no excuses in our league,” Pace said on the podcast. “That happened in New Orleans during Katrina-- really every time a hurricane came towards that city, we adapted.

“What I felt from the leadership from (Saints head coach) Sean (Payton) and (Saints GM) Mickey (Loomis) is there was never an excuse. It was: let’s adapt and let’s adjust, and that’s what we did. From 2005 to 2006, I mean that was a major shift in that team under trying times.”

Pace is referring to the Saints firing Jim Haslett and hiring Sean Payton, and installing Payton’s new systems, all while recovering from Hurricane Katrina. The Saints were incredibly successful working through those hard times too, improving from 3-13 in 2005 to 10-6 and NFC South winners in 2006.

Beyond learning to not let hard times affect his team’s success on the field, Pace says he learned a lot about how to run a team from Payton and Loomis.

“First of all, (Payton’s) very aggressive, he's not afraid to make hard decisions. He’s decisive and Mickey’s the same way: aggressive and decisive, no regrets, never looks back, not afraid to think outside the box, but also very conscious of the culture of that team.

“I think any time you drift away from that-- and it’s easy to do, and enticing to do-- but usually when you do that, once you realize you’ve done that to the locker room, the damage is already done. You try to correct yourself or police a player, the damage is already done in the locker room. So I think it’s being aggressive with the moves you make, not looking back, operating with decisiveness, but then being very conscious of the culture in the locker room.

“It’s a fine line. 12-4 to 8-8, it’s a fine line I think, because the people, the staff, the people in your building are conscious of that.”

Pace has certainly acted decisively when building his roster, trading up to draft Mitchell Trubisky, Leonard Floyd, Anthony Miller and David Montgomery.

But he later says, there’s more nuance than simply acting decisively to become an effective leader.

“When you’re making a hard decision, what’s best for the organization?” Pace said. “Not letting your ego get in the way because ‘Hey, this was your idea,’ ‘You selected this player,’ whatever it is, what’s best for the team? And sometimes those are decisions when you have to remove emotions.”

Pace has shown the ability to set aside his ego to make those hard decisions too. Most recently he opted not to pick up Trubisky’s fifth-year option. He already cut Leonard Floyd. And after he didn’t offer Kyle Fuller a fifth-year option, he paid even more to keep Fuller since the cornerback proved he deserved to stay.

“For me, to be honest, I think that’s come pretty natural and pretty easy, and I think it’s because of my experience in New Orleans.”

RELATED: Why Ryan Pace ultimately decided to trade for Nick Foles

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