Bears

Trestman's GPS has Bears en route

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Trestman's GPS has Bears en route

Marc Trestman did not disappoint after being introduced asthe 14thhead coach in Chicago Bears history.Trestman was smart, organized, concise, andclearly a football guy answering questions from the media, which eliminated hisnervousness.After humble appreciationsto those responsible for delivering Trestman game-ready to the Bears, he foundhis element when he spoke about the science of football when fielding footballquestions, which broke the ice in his initial press conference. Trestman was clear about being hands-on reinventingquarterback Jay Cutler.His excitementwas genuine discussing Cutler, as it should -- Trestman understands Cutleris a great canvass to paint upon.Its notan extreme makeover project, but rather Cutler needs etiquette training to polishrough edges for a much more aesthetically pleasing product.The end result for Trestman ishopefully a magnificent piece of art that plays at a more efficient level.Trestman revealed this will be accomplished bypersonally running the quarterback meeting room, along with calling plays for the Bears on Sundays. Trestmanexplained when he said, It is my passion and something I enjoy.Trestman hit his stride during the press conference when discussinghis starting quarterback Jay Cutler, saying great players want to becoached, too; they want direction. This is where many media and fans mistakenlygo astray understanding Jay Cutler.Ihave written repeatedly how Cutlers demeanor would be a bigger problem if hedidnt care.Football and winning are important toCutler.Caring aboutyour job performance in relation to the success of your team and organizationshould be embraced, not demeaned.Although its expressed different by each player, the trait is real,vital and a tangible asset for success.Players who no longer take pride in football as an important priority intheir life are most likely no longer in the NFL.Outside of the passion, urgency, and commitment to winningchampionships displayed by Trestman during the press conference, he delivered averbal promise of what Bears general manager Phil Emery envisioned in a headcoach. Flexibility adapting to talent presented on the roster was aprerequisite for Emery.Trestman knockedit out of the park when he said philosophy is fluid. Trestmans analogy was scientificallyperfect again when he said, Im the GPS of the team. I let the team know wherewe are and where we are going.Trestman came across as an extremely smart coach whounderstands his "GPS coordinates" must be re-adjusted en route due to newunforeseen variables which may affect his final destination and time of arrival.Bears fans know all too well there are bumpsin the road.But if you travel smart,you ultimately reach your desired goal more safely and quicker.So can any Bears fans send me the GPScoordinates for MET LIFE Stadium in New Jersey?They host the Super Bowl in 2014.

Bears among 50 most valuable sports teams in the world

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USA Today

Bears among 50 most valuable sports teams in the world

The Chicago Bears haven't enjoyed many wins over the last several years, but that hasn't done anything to hurt the franchise's bottom line.

According to a recent report by Forbes, the Bears rank 17th among the 50 most valuable sports teams in the world for 2018. The franchise is valued at $2.85 billion.

17. Chicago Bears

Value: $2.85 billion

1-year change: 6%

Operating income: $114 million

Owner: McCaskey family

Chicago is seventh among NFL teams in the top-17, with Dallas, New England, New York (Giants), Washingon, San Francisco and Los Angeles (Rams) all having higher valuations.

It's no surprise the Bears are this valuable, even without a winning product. They play in one of the greatest sports cities on the planet. And just imagine what will happen to the club's price tag if Mitch Trubisky and the new-look roster actually start winning games. 

Trubisky on NFC North QBs: 'Bring 'em on'

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USA Today

Trubisky on NFC North QBs: 'Bring 'em on'

The NFC North was recently dubbed the most talented quarterback division in the NFL largely because of Aaron Rodgers, Kirk Cousins and Matthew Stafford.

Bears starter Mitch Trubisky may eventually be viewed as an elite quarterback someday, but his average rookie season has created some doubt among analysts about whether he'll ever be that guy.

In a recent sit-down with Bleacher Report's Tyler Dunne, Trubisky said he isn't concerned with outside opinion, nor is he intimidated by the resumes of his NFC North counterparts.

"I've realized that these people you look up to—watching Aaron Rodgers, watching Tom Brady—they're humans just like I am," Trubisky told Dunne. "They can make mistakes. They're just people. We've all been through similar things to get to where we are now. ... As a competitor, you want the biggest, tallest challenge you can possibly ask for.

"So, yeah, give me the division with Aaron Rodgers, Stafford and Kirk Cousins. Bring 'em on."

Trubisky's confidence has been evident this offseason. There's no doubt who the Bears' leader in the locker room is. Just ask Kyle Long.

Still, he's not without his critics, something he said he doesn't consume himself with.

"Why would I be worried about what anybody has to say on the outside?" he said. "You're sitting in a chair talking into a microphone. I'm in the war. I'm in the middle of the hurricane."

Trubisky's name is consistently mentioned after DeShaun Watson and Patrick Mahomes whenever the 2017 quarterback class is discussed and few -- if any -- experts expect him to be the best of the three.

But none of that matters. All Trubisky has to be is a winner in Chicago, and he certainly has the confidence needed to get there.

"So get ready," he said. "I'm going to be prepared. I'm going to give you everything I've got. Hopefully, I make people eat their words with what they say about me."