Bears

View from the Moon: Tice's future worth watching

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View from the Moon: Tice's future worth watching

Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011
1:45 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

Not surprisingly after the praise directed this season and after toward offensive line coach Mike Tice, the Bears turned down a request from the Tennessee Titans to interview Tice for their opening as offensive coordinator.

The interest from Tennessee, first reported by the Chicago Tribune, was mildly surprising if only because the Titans new head coach, Mike Munchak, is himself a Hall of Fame offensive lineman. Munchak hired Bruce Matthews on Feb. 9 as offensive line coach; Matthews is a Hall of Fame offensive lineman and longtime teammate of Munchak with Houston in the Oilers days.

Hiring Tice as offensive coordinator would arguably given the Titans the most line-based coaching staff in recent NFL memory.

Tices future warrants watching. He was under consideration for the Bears O.C. post that eventually went to Mike Martz. At one time there was thinking that Tice would serve as a de facto co-coordinator with another candidate, Tice serving as run-game coordinator and the other assistant performing play calling and management of the passing game.

That notion became moot when Martz was hired. The Martz-Tice fit, involving not only two former head coaches but also two distinctly different offensive philosophies, was an interesting one from the start.

Had Tice and his grounding on the ground left the Bears staff, the Bears would have been hard pressed to even find a top-shelf mentor for what is decidedly still an offensive line in a molten state, let alone a strong personality for a staff in need of that in the shake-out period last season as the Bears offense looked for both personnel and its identity.

Interestingly as well, the Titans almost immediately signed veteran coordinator Chris Palmer as their O.C. Palmer was sought after by the Bears about a decade ago when Dick Jauron was after a permanent successor to Gary Crowton as coordinator.

Because Jauron appeared to be in job-jeopardy after two losing seasons, Palmer insisted on substantial guaranteed money in his three-year deal. The Bears werent so inclined, so Palmer passed and the Bears removed the interim tag from Shoops title. Palmer, who was the first O.C. of the expansion Jacksonville Jaguars under Tom Coughlin (Jauron was the D-coordinator on that staff), went on to become the first head coach of the re-constituted Cleveland Browns.

Whether Tice would have been the frontrunner in Tennessee even with the Bears OK is problematic. Mike Florio at ProFootballTalk.com reports that Palmer likely was the first choice even if the Titans had received permission to talk with Tice and New York Jets offensive line coach Bill Callahan, which the Titans also didnt receive.

Playing Tag

The New England Patriots removed any remote chance the Bears might have had in Logan Mankins when the Pats placed their franchise tag on the Pro Bowl guard. San Diego effectively took coveted wide receiver Vincent Jackson off the market as well with a franchise tag as well.

The Jackson lock-up is not of major significance for the Bears. Jackson would represent an upgrade to any receiving corps but no indication was coming out of Halas Hall that there was going to be a run at Jackson. Braylon Edwards, Roy Williams and even Plaxico Burress rate more realistic chances.

The Bears obviously had interest in Mankins last year but he wasnt going anywhere and the contract situation (huge ) coupled with the collective bargaining situations possible impact on the market made a move on that scale prohibitive.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Bears still see Dion Sims as a valuable piece to their offensive puzzle

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USA Today Sports Images

Bears still see Dion Sims as a valuable piece to their offensive puzzle

Dion Sims is still here, which is the outcome he expected but perhaps wasn’t a slam dunk — at least to those outside the walls at Halas Hall. 

The Bears could’ve cut ties with Sims prior to March 16 and saved $5.666 million against the cap, quite a figure for a guy coming off a disappointing 2017 season (15 catches, 180 yards, one touchdown). But the Bears are sticking with Sims, even after splashing eight figures to land Trey Burton in free agency earlier this year. 

“In my mind, I thought I was coming back,” Sims said. “I signed to be here three years and that’s what I expect. But I understand how things go and my job is come out here and work hard every day and play with a chip on my shoulder to prove myself and just be a team guy.”

The Bears signed Sims to that three-year, $18 million contract 14 months ago viewing him as a rock-solid blocking tight end with some receiving upside. The receiving upside never materialized, and his blocking was uneven at times as the Bears’ offense slogged through a bleak 11-loss season. 

“The situation we were in, we weren’t — we could’ve done a better job of being successful,” Sims said. “Things didn’t go how we thought it would. We just had to pretty much try to figure out how to come together and build momentum into coming into this year. I just think there were a lot of things we could have done, but because of the circumstances we were limited a little bit. 

“… It was a lot of things going on. Guys hurt, situations — it was tough for us. We couldn’t figure it out, along with losing, that was a big part of it too.”

Sims will be given a fresh start in 2018, even as Adam Shaheen will be expected to compete to cut into Sims’ playing time at the “Y” tight end position this year. The other side of that thought: Shaheen won’t necessarily slide into being the Bears’ primary in-line tight end this year. 

Sims averaged 23 receptions, 222 yards and two touchdowns from 2014-2016; that might be a good starting point for his 2018 numbers, even if it would represent an improvement from 2017. More important, perhaps, is what Sims does as a run blocker — and that was the first thing Nagy mentioned when talking about how Sims fits into his offense. 

“The nice thing with Dion is that he’s a guy that’s proven to be a solid blocker,” Nagy said. “He can be in there and be your Y-tight end, but yet he still has really good hands. He can make plays on intermediate routes. He’s not going to be anybody that’s a downfield threat — I think he knows that, we all know that — but he’s a valuable piece of this puzzle.”

Bears logo ranked in bottom five of NFL in recent fan poll

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USA Today

Bears logo ranked in bottom five of NFL in recent fan poll

The Chicago Bears logo has withstood the test of time. In a sports era full of uniform changes, the Bears have maintained the classic orange 'C' for most of their nearly 100 years in Chicago.

Unfortunately, tradition doesn't equate to popularity.

Chicago's logo ranked 28th in the NFL, according to a recent poll of nearly 1,500 football fans. Only the Redskins (29), Bengals (30), Jets (31) and Browns (32) were worse.

I’m not sure how I feel about the underbite on the “C.” I can see how this would be a polarizing feature of this logo. I wish to an extent that it met up more evenly. I think they could have had the bottom meet up in a more even fashion and still maintained the sharpness, of the “C,” which I like. I don’t mind the point [ON THE BACK SIDE OF THE “C”], without the point it would be super boring. The point actually does add something from a design standpoint that makes it stand out.

Bears fans will take exception with the results. Wins have been hard to come by in recent seasons, but there's still something special about seeing the familiar navy and orange on Sundays in the fall. The 'C' is arguably the biggest part of that. Sure, it's not a complex design overflowing with colors, but it represents a long and storied history. 

It's interesting that each of the bottom five teams have struggled to string together winning seasons. On the flipside, teams like the Saints, Falcons, Rams, Vikings and Eagles rank in the top six. Maybe it's recency bias.

In the NFC North, the Lions rank No. 2 (which is a shocker) and the Packers are No. 20.