Bears

Want a big name Bears coach? First, choose the right prism

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Want a big name Bears coach? First, choose the right prism

Looking at an object through a prism bends the light and distorts what you are seeing. Time is a prism, for instance; it obscures things. Like coaches performances.

In his breaking story on Pete Carmichael Jr. interviewing with the Bears, Mike Florio at ProFootballTalk.com throws in that Carmichael had success as New Orleans offensive coordinator, but with Drew Brees as his quarterback.

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Apply that same qualifier to some other, bigger-name coaches:

Want Jon Gruden? I would, as long as he brings with him Simeon Rice, Warren Sapp, John Lynch, Derrick Brooks and Ronde Barber all in their primes. Gruden, by the way, made the playoffs twice over his final six years (Lovie Smith was three times in nine season), losing both times in wild-card games. The Bucs were 18th in scoring their Super Bowl season and 24th in yardage (the Bears were 16th in scoring, 28th in yardage last year).

How about Bill Cowher? Definitely the one you want, as long as Ben Roethlisberger, James Harrison and Troy Polamalu get off the plane with him. And that was when he won his Super Bowl in his 14th season. He did win one conference championship, in his fourth year. Lovie Smith got one of those in his third year.

Andy Reid is in demand, interviewing at Arizona and Kansas City. Presumably the Cardinals and Chiefs know that Reid isnt bringing Donovan McNabb in his prime.

Bears head coach Matt Nagy is beginning to find his identiy

Bears head coach Matt Nagy is beginning to find his identiy

What the Bears did to the Dallas Cowboys in Thursday’s 31-24 defeat of the NFC East leaders was significant because of the complete offensive performance.

Based on quality of opponent, gravity of game and player performance, it was quarterback Mitch Trubisky’s career-best game. The 31 points scored by the offense was the most since the mauling of a JV Tampa Bay team last year (when Trubisky threw a career-high six touchdown passes).

And against the Cowboys the offense came back from difficult in-game situations twice.

It wasn’t the Bears that appeared to be settling into an identity that has eluded them through too much of the Matt Nagy era.

Reasons behind the performance against Dallas – collective and Trubisky’s individually – were far from exclusive to this game. Tight-end play, receivers and line doing their jobs are repeatable positives that tell fans an offensive performance like this can and should happen again, more than once.

The difference against the Cowboys? Nagy appeared to be settling into his own identity.

With varying levels of proficiency, his players were running what he laid out and told them to. That changed dramatically against Dallas.

Over the third quarter of the season and into the fourth with Dallas, Nagy has operated less like a coach forcing players into his system and more like a coach molding the offense around his players.

Maybe it was seeing first-hand how miserably coach Matt Patricia forcing the Detroit Lions into his iteration of the New England defense has worked. The Bears’ 2019 turnaround coincidentally started against the Lions.

Whatever the reason, Nagy appeared less lock-stepped with a significantly flawed pass-intensive plan (Green Bay, Oakland, New Orleans losses) that his own personal quarterback nature may prefer. Maybe this is his more adult inner-coach is taking charge.

Players, Trubisky foremost among them, could be excused for feeling some uncertainty about their offense when their coach didn’t have a clear sense of what that offense is or wants to be.

Not a “blame game” situation, however. Nagy, an inexperienced head coach, had a green quarterback on his hands. Trubisky’s true capabilities, comfort levels, and weaknesses are still evolving. Nagy is also dealing with the same route-running, drops, O-line issues and such that plagued Trubisky.

Critically, Nagy’s play-calling has leveled out without lapsing into predictability. He has been less riveted to a game concept with no regard for results and been more adaptable.

When the Bears won three straight to finish the season’s first quarter, Nagy had the offense run the football 29, 24 and 33 times. When he and the offense languished through four straight losses, the Bears ran the football 17, 7, 38 and 18 times.

Since then Nagy has called 24-24-26-23-34 runs and the Bears have won four of those last five.

That doesn’t make Nagy a runnin’ guy. It does, however, make the team better and improves his quarterback’s understanding of the offense.

“Probably three to four, five weeks ago, somewhere in that range where you really started to feel, ‘OK, we're moving the ball,’” Nagy said. “We felt it against the Chargers [when the Bears ran 38 times]. We just weren't good in the red zone, right? But we felt like, ‘OK we're moving the ball,’ that we were limiting three-and-outs.

“And ever since then there's just a great confidence amongst the teammates. They're feeling it, we're feeling it and I think it's reflecting in the game.”

Nowhere more apparent than with Trubisky against Dallas and hopefully going forward.

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NFC Wild Card Race: What Bears fans should be watching in Week 14

NFC Wild Card Race: What Bears fans should be watching in Week 14

The Bears did their part to keep their playoff hopes alive on Thursday night with a 31-24 victory over the Dallas Cowboys, thanks in large part to quarterback Mitch Trubisky's best game as a pro. But a slow start to the 2019 season and a 7-6 record means they still need a bunch of help to get into the postseason.

Here are the games Bears fans need to watch this Sunday.

Detroit Lions at Minnesota Vikings - 12 p.m. CT (Only available on NFL Sunday Ticket)

The Vikings (8-4) currently have possession of the final NFC wild card and should maintain their position after facing the Lions (3-8-1) on Sunday.

Detroit is an absolute mess. Third-string quarterback David Blough will make the second start of his career, and while he had some encouraging moments against the Bears on Thanksgiving Day, the Vikings (unlike Chicago, who found out he was starting just moments before the game) have had a full week to prepare for him. Expect a bunch of turnovers.

It would be nothing short of a miracle if Minnesota blows this one. Expect the Vikings to move to 9-4 and keep hold of their two-game lead over the Bears.

Los Angeles Rams vs. Seattle Seahawks - 7:20 p.m. CT on NBC (Click here to watch)

The other key matchup Bears fans should have an eye on in Week 14 is the Rams (7-5) vs. Seahawks (10-2). The Rams own the head-to-head tiebreaker over Chicago because of their 17-7 win in Week 11, which means Los Angeles has to lose two of their final four games against Seattle, Dallas, San Francisco and Arizona (and that's assuming the Bears win out).

The Rams should have little trouble defeating the Cowboys and Cardinals, so it's critical Seattle gives Bears fans one of those two necessary L.A. losses.

Green Bay Packers vs. Washington Redskins - 12 p.m. CT on FOX (Click here to watch)

Lastly, the Green Bay Packers (9-3) take on the Washington Redskins (3-9). Believe it or not, a Packers loss keeps hope alive for the Bears and an NFC North championship. A Redskins victory is highly unlikely, but they weren't supposed to defeat the Panthers last week, either.

It's pretty simple: Wins by the Lions, Seahawks and Redskins will make Week 15's game against the Packers one of the biggest regular-season games in a very, very long time.

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