Bears

Why Dowell Loggains was pleased with what Mike Glennon did against Atlanta

Why Dowell Loggains was pleased with what Mike Glennon did against Atlanta

Dowell Loggains was quick to point out the No. 1 positive thing Mike Glennon did against the Atlanta Falcons: “We didn’t turn it over.” 

Not only did Glennon not thrown an interception, none of his 40 pass attempts were dangerously close to being picked off. In one sense, Glennon did his job, and had the Bears’ defense not blown a couple coverages in the fourth quarter, he might not have needed that last-ditch drive that ended five yards from the end zone. 

“We talked about it all week, how important it was against that team not to turn the football over, because the way they run to the ball, they swarm,” Loggains said. “But to get it to the two-minute drive, that was our goal the whole time. We felt like we could win it in the end.” 

Loggians was happy with how Glennon executed the offensive gameplan, which saw the Bears only take one shot downfield (an incompletion to Tarik Cohen) and rely more on their running backs than their receivers/tight ends until the final few minutes. Until Mitchell Trubisky is deemed ready, this is probably what the Bears’ offense will look like.

(When Trubisky is ready is a separate topic, with the Bears continuing to praise Glennon’s ability to win at the line of scrimmage — the area in which Trubisky needs the most work — they don’t think he’s there yet.)

While the Bears only scored 17 points, here’s something else to consider: After one week (an admittedly small sample size), Football Outsiders’ DVOA ranks the Bears’ offense 10th. Ahead of them are mostly teams that won’t surprise you, based on Week 1: Kansas City, Oakland, Atlanta, Minnesota, Tennessee, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Dallas and the Los Angeles Rams. By the advanced numbers, the Bears’ offense was 16 percent better than average, which isn’t a bad place to start a season. 

Even if you aren't an advanced stats fan or don't buy those numbers after just one week, they are worth noting given Loggains' evaluation. 

“Mike managed the clock, managed the game, really managed the game,” Loggains said. “When I say managed the game — sometimes that phrase can be misconstrued — he did exactly what he needed to do to play the game we detailed out to him, how we thought we could win the game and what was best for us and that matchup, that game. He handled all the situations, did a really good job.”

Would Eric Berry be an upgrade at safety for Bears? Allen Robinson thinks so

Would Eric Berry be an upgrade at safety for Bears? Allen Robinson thinks so

Former Kansas City Chiefs safety Eric Berry was once considered an elite NFL defender, especially after he returned to the gridiron following a battle with cancer in 2014. He resumed his status as one of the best safeties in the league, but a torn Achilles in 2017 limited him to just two games between the 2017 and 2018 seasons.

He was out of football in 2019, and according to NFL Network's Mike Garafolo, it was an intentional decision by Berry who had suitors on the open market.

With Berry ready to make his return to the league, and the Bears potentially in the market for a safety this offseason, wide receiver Allen Robinson offered a pretty surprising comment on Twitter suggesting Berry would be an upgrade over what Chicago fielded in 2019 with Eddie Jackson and Ha Ha Clinton-Dix.

And while Robinson is entitled to his opinion, his decision to share it publicly may not have been the best choice. Clinton-Dix took notice.


RELATED: Top 30 free agents of the 2020 NFL offseason

It's also worth noting that Clinton-Dix had a pretty strong first season as a Bear. One could argue he'll be more hotly pursued on the open market than Berry, whose best football is in the rear-view mirror at 31 years old.

It's common for players to softly recruit respected veteran free agents through social media and other means this time of year. The Bears may have no choice but to sign a player like Berry who should come at a discounted rate compared to Clinton-Dix this offseason. But if Clinton-Dix does return, it'll be interesting to monitor the locker-room dynamic in training camp.

Back in Miami for the Super Bowl, Devin Hester still remembers THAT touchdown

Back in Miami for the Super Bowl, Devin Hester still remembers THAT touchdown

It's been 13 years since Devin Hester took the opening kickoff of Super Bowl XLI back for a touchdown in one of the most electrifying moments in Chicago sports history. 

As the football world converges in South Beach for only the second time since that night, Hester –– who will be in Miami all week on behalf of the NFL-affiliated company On Location Experiences -- talked with NBC Sports Chicago about what it was like in that moment. 

"Oh man, it was nerve-wracking for me," he said. "Being a rookie coming into the NFL and then playing in the one of the biggest games of the year, the Super Bowl, and not only that, but to be the first one to touch the ball, it was intense."

"I was very nervous. At the same time, I was one of the players that always wanted the ball in my hands on big stages, so knowing that opportunity was a 50/50 chance of me getting it first, I just wanted to make that opportunity if I did get that chance to get my hands on the ball the first play of the game."

And if that wasn't impressive enough, the touchdown isn't even the clear-cut favorite for Hester's favorite play, and for good reason: 

"I would say it had to be in the top 2. My other one was pretty much the same thing, my first year in college, first game of the season. Pretty much the same thing, taking the opening kickoff back. Those two have to be the favorite moments of my career."