Blackhawks

Blackhawks Notes: Bolland keeps rolling

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Blackhawks Notes: Bolland keeps rolling

Monday, May 31, 2010
3:06 PM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

CHICAGO You wouldnt think that in a Game 1 that featured 10 goals in the first 40 minutes that the Chicago Blackhawks would have thought to do any scoreboard watching.

But even in a game featuring four ties and three lead changes, as time started ticking short and a 6-5 lead had fallen in their laps, the Redshirts couldnt help but hope to bleed the puckand watch the clock.

As usual, Blackhawks forward Kris Versteeg put one of the more humorous wraps on the end of Game 1.

Im looking up at the clock in the third and its eight minutes, 7:59, 7:58 he said. Im thinking, Im not going to live to see the end of this.

Defenseman Brent Sopel, already embarrassed over the unanticipated explosion of offense his blueliners allowed from the Philadelphia Flyers, wasnt counting the clock, however.

No way, I wasnt thinking we could just hold the lead and get out of there, Sopel said. I was thinking, Oh my God, whats going to happen next?

In a game where no lead is safe, there is no player who wants more to skate off the ice having stolen a win than the goalie. And Blackhawks netminder Antti Niemi, always honest after games, was itching to exit stage right: In the third, I was pretty much waiting for the end of the game.

Both sides anticipate a more buttoned-down Game 2 tonightbut that doesnt preclude some scoreboard watching once the team gets a lead. If youre at the United Center, bring those binocs and see whos gazing heavenward.

One guy who wont be is the chronically down-low Dustin Byfuglien. No line of excited questioning got Big Buff to admit he was hoping the clock would speed up at the end of Game 1.

The most the brusque forward would share about the end of Chicagos first Stanley Cup triumph in more than 37 years, in characteristic deadpan? The bench was pretty crazy.

Bolly Just Keeps Rolling
Speaking of deadpan Blackhawks, you simply cant rattle inimitable center Dave Bolland, who is hitting his stride at just the right time this season.

Offensively, Bolland has six goals through 17 games in the playoffs, equaling his season output (in 39 games). Two of those tallies have been shorthanded, including Saturdays first-period shortie that gave the Blackhawks their first lead of the Stanley Cup Finals. Defensively, the fifth-year man has centered Chicagos erstwhile checking line, (flanked by Kris Versteeg and, alternately, Tomas Kopecky or Andrew Ladd), making life miserable for forwards from the Sedin Twins to Joe Thornton.

But ask Bolland to chat about it any of his numerous recent accomplishments and, well, youre just going to get an aw-shucks grin and little elucidation. Heres the wordiest answers gathered from Bolly since media day:

On the relative mellowness of Game 1: It wasnt very feisty, I dont know why. It was pretty calm. Nothing really happened.

On his sudden, steely skill on shorthanded attempts: I dont know about that. I couldnt tell you what I was doing out there. I was trying to go five-hole on Philadelphia goaltender Michael Leighton, but I missed. It tipped off his stick and he let it in.

On Blackhawks coach Joel Quennevilles mentoring: Weve talked a lot. Hes helped me out when my speed or stick-handling wasnt there. Hed call me in, give me little pointers. His confidence was reassuring.

On what he watched while recuperating from back surgery during the season: DVRd shows like Nurse Jackie, Weeds, Californication.

The Human Soundbite
No one will ever confuse Blackhawks grinder Adam Burish with Wayne Gretzky on the ice, but the gritty forward is an All-Star in the dressing room, never failing to entertain with honest and unfiltered comments.

Today, Burish was asked about what the NHL can do to make hockey even more popular in the United States, and he ran off a number of answers, concluding with this assumptive gem: In what other sport can you punch a guy in the face or chase another guy around with a weapon in your hands?

Surprisingly, as dressing room time ran short it seemed Burish hadnt yet been asked whether hed sized up his series rival yet, a Philadelphian who hed target for extra checks, jawing andor fighting.

No, Ive still been trying, Burish said with a smile. Aaron Asham and I exchanged a few words after all the Dustin Byfuglien stuff in the first, but that died down. Im still working on it. The series isnt aggressive enough yet. But it will be.

Should the Blackhawks explore bringing back Artemi Panarin?

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USA TODAY

Should the Blackhawks explore bringing back Artemi Panarin?

Here's an interesting development as we approach the NHL Draft: Artemi Panarin has informed the Blue Jackets that he's not ready to consider an extension "at this time" and because of that, Columbus is testing the market for the Russian winger, according to Elliotte Friedman of Sportsnet.

Blue Jackets general manager Jarmo Kekalainen responded to the report shortly after in a statement released by the team:

"Artemi is an elite National Hockey League player. Our position has been that we want him to be a Blue Jacket for many years and that has not changed. He has a year left on his contract, so there is plenty of time to work towards that end. Should anything change moving forward, we will address it at that time and any decision we make will be in the best interest of our club.”

Ironically, Panarin was traded to Columbus on the afternoon of last year's draft as part of a blockbuster package that sent Brandon Saad back to Chicago. It shook up the hockey world, and has the potential to do so again.

Panarin is set to become an unrestricted free agent in 2019, but is free to sign an extension with Columbus on July 1. Clearly, that doesn't seem to be in the cards right now and it's why the Blue Jackets have to put out feelers. They can't risk losing him for nothing.

On the flip side, Panarin has every right to test the open market. He has one year left on his contract that carries a $6 million cap hit. He's due for a hefty raise, will be 27 years old next summer — the prime of his hockey career — and will certainly be looking for a long-term deal after accepting a bridge contract with the Blackhawks.

Speaking of whom, should his former team explore bringing him back to Chicago now that he's on the market?

Every general manager should and will do their due diligence and call for an asking price, Stan Bowman included. Those conversations might start with Alex DeBrincat or Nick Schmaltz, and if that's the case, you say thanks but no thanks and move on. 

The Blackhawks have the Nos. 8 and 27 picks in this year's draft as possible ammunition, but the Blue Jackets are ready to take that next step. They were up 2-0 in their first-round series before losing four straight to the eventual Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals. It's unlikely they'd be looking to center a potential deal around draft picks. 

The only way you even consider it from the Blackhawks perspective is if Panarin is guaranteed to sign a long-term extension at a price you're comfortable with, but that's one of the main reasons why they traded him in the first place. 

To cap it all off, trading for Panarin wouldn't even address the Blackhawks' biggest need and that's a Top 4 defenseman. Those don't grow on trees. The Blackhawks will have the cap space to sign a player like James van Riemsdyk to patch up their top 6. You can't say the same for the free-agent blue line group.

So while it may certainly be fun for Blackhawks fans to come up with possible trade scenarios to get Panarin back in an Indianhead sweater, it just doesn't make great sense for a variety of reasons.

NHL Draft Profile: F Filip Zadina

NHL Draft Profile: F Filip Zadina

From June 17-21, Charlie Roumeliotis will profile two prospects per day — 10 total (five forwards, five defensemen) — leading up to the NHL Draft.​

Filip Zadina

Position: Forward
Height: 6-foot-0
Weight: 195 pounds
Shoots: Left

Scouting report:

"He's got the puck skills, is a good skater, and is a guy with some high-end offensive talent. He wants to get right in there and play where it's hard and where you get rewarded. When he gets that puck on his stick, he wants to bury it."

NHL player comparable: Marian Hossa

Fit for Blackhawks:

You know who the Blackhawks missed last year? Hossa. It's not mentioned enough when analyzing what went wrong in 2017-18. 

Well, Zadina is a player who's got the upside of Hossa and is one of a few prospects who could potentially crack the NHL lineup this upcoming season. The scouting report above is all you need to know about Zadina's style of play, and Blackhawks fans surely nodded through the whole thing because it's exactly what the team is looking for.

However, this is a case where the Blackhawks would have to trade up to snag him if they want him, because there's little chance he'll be on the board when the eighth pick rolls around. And it's probably unlikely they would do so, given what it may take to move up a few spots.