Blackhawks

Exhausted Mayers happy to see lockout's end

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Exhausted Mayers happy to see lockout's end

Jamal Mayers was feeling all the emotions of the lockouts end on Sunday: Joy knowing that hockey will return to action soon enough, relief that at least some of the season was salvaged and exhaustion after participating in those marathon negotiating sessions in New York this weekend.

MORE: NHL lockout comes to an end

I joked a few times that it was like getting a crash-course MBA, said the Blackhawks forward, who landed back in Chicago after a long and ultimately deal-making weekend in New York. It was definitely an unbelievable experience, something Ill never forget. There are so many different components and elements that are interrelated. I learned a lot on how these things work.

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Both sides finally did get it to work this weekend in New York, as they agreed on a framework for a new collective bargaining agreement in the wee hours of Sunday morning. It wasnt easy. A 13-hour day meeting with a mediator on Friday, then a 16-hour day of small and big meetings that culminated in the late-night (make that early-morning) deal.

Mayers, talking about that final day, said it was impossible to describe the process to anyone who wasnt there.

We decided to go into small-group meetings, created some momentum and probably went back and forth on different things seven or eight times over the course of (Saturday) night and (Sunday) morning, said Mayers, who also participated in the ownerplayer meetings in December. The reality was, we only had a few issues remaining, although they were very important.

Federal mediator Scot Beckenbaugh, who was logging serious hours going between the two parties on Friday and meeting with them together on SaturdaySunday has been praised for his part in getting this done. Mayers said Beckenbaugh deserves every bit of it.

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I dont think we couldve gotten the deal done, quite frankly, without him, Mayers said. With such few major issues remaining, he was able to pull out of each side what was there and make a determination on how to proceed. His approach worked and we were able to give on some things on both sides and come to an agreement.

Now that the deal is just about done, both sides focus on the tasks at hand: getting back to hockey, and getting back into the fans good graces.

Obviously were nothing without the fans, and obviously theyre hurt, Mayers said. We have the most passionate fans out there. My hope is they come back and support us, and our job is to have a good product on the ice. The reality is, its going to be some unbelievable hockey. Whether its 48 or 50 games, its going to be a sprint to get to the playoffs. The hockeys going to be intense and exciting; guys are ready and have been skating here all along preparing for this. Im happy its not for naught and we get to do what we love for the fans.

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Its been a draining few months of a lockout and it was one intense negotiating weekend in New York. For Mayers, it was an interesting experience. And it finally led to a much-needed conclusion.

I was glad I was a part of it and its something Ill carry with me after Im done playing, Mayers said. The guys there really helped. We didnt always agree, but everyone was very respectful and gave their opinion. Its tough when youre trying to represent 700 guys. Im exhausted, but Im definitely glad I was part of the process.

NHL Draft Profile: D Quinn Hughes

NHL Draft Profile: D Quinn Hughes

From June 17-21, Charlie Roumeliotis will profile two prospects per day — 10 total (five forwards, five defensemen) — leading up to the NHL Draft.​

Quinn Hughes

Position: Defenseman
Height: 5-foot-10
Weight: 170 pounds
Shoots: Left

Scouting report:

"He's got the puck skills, is a good skater, and is a guy with some high-end offensive talent. He wants to get right in there and play where it's hard and where you get rewarded. When he gets that puck on his stick, he wants to bury it."

NHL player comparable: Torey Krug/Kris Letang

Fit for Blackhawks:

It's no secret the Blackhawks are looking to restock their pipeline with some high-end defensemen. Henri Jokiharju and Ian Mitchell are on the way. But the former isn't a lock to be a full-time NHLer this season and the latter will continue playing in college for the 2018-19 season.

Hughes, who shined at Michigan and the IIHF World Championship with Team USA, would have the best chance of the three to crack the Blackhawks lineup first. The problem is, he likely won't be available at No. 8, so if Hughes is the guy they're locked in on, they'd need to trade up to grab him. 

If they did that, Hughes would give the Blackhawks a third blue line prospect they can get excited about. He's a left-handed shot, which evens out the balance in the system, and he would become a prime candidate to eventually replace Duncan Keith as the team's No. 1 defenseman.

NHL Draft Profile: F Oliver Wahlstrom

NHL Draft Profile: F Oliver Wahlstrom

From June 17-21, Charlie Roumeliotis will profile two prospects per day — 10 total (five forwards, five defensemen) — leading up to the NHL Draft.​

Oliver Wahlstrom

Position: Right wing
Height: 6-foot-1
Weight: 205 pounds
Shoots: Right

Scouting report:

"Wahlstrom already has an NHL-caliber shot with a quick release and the ability to create space for himself and linemates. He's most known for his goal-scoring ability and elite shot, and can hit a one-timer as good or better than many professional players."

NHL player comparable: Phil Kessel

Fit for Blackhawks:

The Blackhawks would probably prefer to take a defenseman at No. 8, but because four of them might go inside the Top 7, the best available player on the board is likely to be a forward. And there's a decent chance that could be Wahlstrom.

Wahlstrom would immediately become Chicago's top prospect, and a player that has the potential to slide into the top six when he reaches the NHL — whenever that may be.

He's committed to college for the 2018-19 season, so it's doubtful he would join the team until at least 2019-20, but Blackhawks vice president of amateur scouting Mark Kelley said in our draft preview edition of the Hawks Talk Podcast that it wouldn't deter them from picking him. 

And it shouldn't, because you don't want to waste a player of his caliber's entry-level years developing in the minors if he's not ready yet.

"I think the way we would evaluate it is, we project them, we try to get a timeline on when we think they might be NHL ready," Kelley said. "But we're also looking for where they are in their development curve and want their ceiling is. I think in some players, you have to be a little bit more patient for them to reach their ceiling. That doesn't necessarily mean that players can't exceed their development curve, I think we saw that with Alex DeBrincat last year."