Blackhawks

Hawk Talk: Sky-high again, eyeing 7th heaven

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Hawk Talk: Sky-high again, eyeing 7th heaven

Monday, April 25, 2011
Posted: 5:34 p.m. Updated: 12:03 a.m.
By Chris BodenCSNChicago.com

The Blackhawks weren't flying quite as high as they would've liked en route to Game 7 in Vancouver Tuesday night. Left Wing Bryan Bickell could miss the remainder of the playoffs, no longer how long they last, but definitely the first-round series finale and whatever else could be immediately beyond.

"Bryan Bickell underwent surgery with our hand surgeon to repair a tendon lacerated during Game 2 of the Western Cnbference Quarterfinals," said Head Team Physician Dr. Michael Terry in a statement. "While the surgery was anticipated since the injury occurred, Bryan wanted to play before time ran out to complete the procedure appropriately. We anticipate a full recovery in approximately six to eight weeks."

Bickell had two goals in helping the team rally over the last three games, opening the scoring in Games Four and Six. He missed Game 3 after Canucks defenseman Sami Salo accidentally cut him near his wrist after a fall near the Blackhawks bench in Game 2.

Joel Quenneville did announce that Tomas Kopecky was (unlike for Game Five) on this trip and "progressing" from his upper-body injury sustained in the first period of the series opener, raising hope he might be available if the Hawks become the first 8th seed to rally from a 3-0 series deficit to beat a top seed.

But first things, first. The defending champs claim they're not spending much time worrying about who starts in goal for Vancouver Tuesday night, even if Cory Schneider was helped off the ice with only muscle cramping, and not anything more serious.

This will be the first Game 7 in Blackhawks history since 1995, when Denis Savard and company rallied from a 2-0 first-round deficit to defeat Toronto. The only players on the current roster who've played in playoff Game 7's are Marian Hossa, Brian Campbell, and Marty Turco. Quenneville coached in three of them in St. Louis.

While Jonathan Toews may be having a quiet offensive series, Quenneville noted that he's been neutralized - and is neutralizing - 41-goal scorer Ryan Kesler, who's expected to be a Selke Trophy (Best Defensive Forward) finalist this week. Each center's been held to no goals and three assists.

There are some interesting things to note about the new faces on each side as this series has progressed. Aside from the injured Manny Malhotra, Canucks GM Mike Gillis added Dan Hamhuis, Keith Ballard, and Raffi Torres. Torres' hit on Brent Seabrook seems to have worked in reverse against his team. Ballard has been a healthy scratch the past two games. Hamhuis pushed Dave Bolland's head into the glass in Game 5, then got his come-uppance from Bolland behind the net Sunday night, setting up the first goal. Then he set up the third by tripping Michael Frolik, leading to his penalty shot.

On the Blackhawks' side, Frolik has two goals, five points and a plus-5 rating. Ben Smith's scored three goals. Chris Campoli's a plus-3 after committing his worst mistake since being acquired at the trade deadline, with the turnover that led to Vancouver's second goal. His teammates would make it a lot less costly.

The Sedins have combined for 12 points through six games (they had 10 in the six games a year ago), but didn't have Bolland in their grill the first three games.

Since Bolland has again treated the Sedin Twins like a scratchy, uncomfortable sweater (a combined minus-13 since his Game Four return, while Bolland has been plus-6), here are some Vancouver-related quotes he left the media with at O'Hare Monday before the team's departure for Game Seven:

On if any thoughts about the Canucks' scenario has crossed his mind: "I don't think I wanna be in those shoes."

If this year's "wingmen" with him (Michael Frolik and Bryan Bickell) form a better line than last year's (Andrew Ladd and Kris Versteeg): "This one."

Because it's the current one? "Yep."

On whether he knew it was Hamhuis retrieving the puck behind Vancouver's net (after being upset wih Hamhuis pushing his head into the glass in Game 5), leading to his big hit, and the Hawks' first goal, by Bickell: "I think I knew from the blue line, in. I thought it felt better than a goal, yep."

On whether he'd ever vacation in Vancouver: "I'm pretty sure if I'm gonna go there on vacation it wouldn't be nice. They probably wouldn't let me in once I got to the border. I think people do recognize me and it's not the nices things they (could) say."

On defending the Sedins: "I don't think I have a formula. It's not like math. I just have to go out there and play. They're just two ordinary players." (This after admitting he heard about the Canucks calling him "nothing special," and "not a game-changer" upon his return to the lineup for Game 4)

On Toews' two goals in the last 18 games: "After last night, 'Tazer' asked me when he was gonna score. I was like, 'I dunno, pretty soon, hopefully.' I guess I'll just keep scoring."

Possible rematch?

If the Blackhawks complete their first-round series comeback from a 3-0 deficit Tuesday night in Vancouver, they'd face San Jose in the second round.

Joe Thornton scored the game-winner (and series-clincher) early in overtime after the Sharks killed off a 5-minute Kings power play that spanned the end of regulation into the start of overtime. After their 4-3 win, the Sharks await either the Blackhawks or Red Wings in round two.

By virtue of the Sharks being the highest remaining seed in the West by virtue of the 8th- (and lowest) seeded Hawks knocking off number-one seed Vancouver, it would set up a rematch of last spring's Western Conference Final a round earlier, highlighted by Hawks Cup-winning goalie Antti Niemi opposing his heir, Crawford.

But first-things-first: the Blackhawks need to defeat the Canucks in Vancouver in Game 7 Tuesday night.

Chris Boden is the host of Blackhawks Pre and Postgame Live on Comcast SportsNet.

Chris Kunitz on in-season coaching change experience with Penguins that led to Stanley Cup

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USA TODAY

Chris Kunitz on in-season coaching change experience with Penguins that led to Stanley Cup

In-season coaching changes are hard to predict in the NHL. There were zero of them last season, which was a rarity. This year, there have already been two so far (Joel Quenneville and John Stevens) and they're usually done for a similar reason: the group is underperforming and teams want to salvage whatever is left of the season.

Chris Kunitz was part of a mid-season coaching change as an alternate captain with Pittsburgh in 2015-16 when Mike Sullivan took over for Mike Johnston on Dec. 12 after the Penguins went 6-6-3 following a 9-4-0 start. It was probably time for a new voice there anyways, but the Penguins lost four straight games in regulation to start Sullivan’s tenure as coach. Things didn’t look great.

But it wasn’t because players weren’t responding. It was more-so the challenge of getting acclimated to a new system and unlearning old habits on the fly. That’s what the Blackhawks are going through right now with Jeremy Colliton.

“Some of the guys have played a different system and haven't played anything like this,” Kunitz said. “Being around the league, I've played in a system like this, I feel comfortable with the changes on the fly. But for some guys, it's not that natural instinct to do something different than they've been doing for 8-10 years."

In many ways, Sullivan and Colliton have a similar coaching style: play with pace, be aggressive on the forecheck, quick and clean zone exits. It helps having a guy like Kunitz in the locker room to help with that transition, for both the younger players and veterans.

Once the Penguins did get accustomed to the new system, they never looked back. They snapped that four-game losing streak on Dec. 21 and didn't lose back-to-back games in regulation the rest of the season. It was exactly what they needed. They went into the playoffs as one of the hottest teams — winning 13 of their final 14 games — and eventually went on to win the Stanley Cup, the first of their back-to-back.

Obviously, the 2018-19 Blackhawks are not the 2015-16 Penguins. But it provides a glimpse into how it takes time to adjust to a different system mid-season while also offering hope that it's not too late for a struggling team going through a coaching change to turn around their season.

"Any time there's something changing, guys want that 'why' or 'how does this affect what's going on out there?' Kunitz said. "It's easier if we talk through it as a group or with coaches to better understand why we're doing it and how we're trying to accomplish it and where the puck is supposed to be at certain times. Whenever we can just have that natural instinct to transition from watching it to doing it on the ice, that's when we'll have more success."

After going winless (0-2-1) in Colliton's first three games as an NHL head coach, the Blackhawks got back in the win column with a 1-0 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Wednesday night. They had been making progress, but weren't seeing the end result reflect that.

The Blackhawks got reinforcement that what they're doing is working so far, as long as they stick with it. If they continue to do that, the points will follow. And that's all they can control right now.

"It's starting to believe in yourself," Kunitz said. "... It's a process of understanding the system and getting to the right level of comfort with each other, but also going out there and outworking the other team. That's what it boils down to.

"With changing the systems, it's more learning and trying to educate yourself. Go out and practice, coach says keep it clean, have good passes and the results will come. When we go out there and we keep it clean in the D-zone, when we've come up the ice we've had good things, we've had success. Probably haven't scored as many goals as we should have, but in the end we have to work harder in our D-zone and when we do all that and put a complete game together, I know the end result will be there."

Four takeaways: Blackhawks blank Blues to end losing skid, give Jeremy Colliton first win

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AP

Four takeaways: Blackhawks blank Blues to end losing skid, give Jeremy Colliton first win

Here are four takeaways from the Blackhawks' 1-0 win over the St. Louis Blues at the United Center on Thursday:

1. Jeremy Colliton's first NHL win

For the first time since Oct. 25, the Blackhawks are back in the win column. A weight has been lifted off their shoulders after going winless in their previous eight games (0-6-2).

But it was an extra special night for the Blackhawks, who helped Colliton earn his first victory as an NHL head coach and celebrated by giving him the game puck.

"I’m just here to help them," Colliton said. "So it's kind of awkward, actually. But I do appreciate the gesture and for me, it’s just, hopefully we can get some momentum going and build on it."

2. Corey Crawford puts up a goose egg

Going into the game, Crawford had a 3.07 goals against average and .901 save percentage, which are below average numbers. But he certainly hasn't played that way. He was often the Blackhawks' best player during their losing streak and has deserved better fate than he's gotten.

By stopping all 28 shots he faced, Crawford earned his first shutout since Nov. 4, 2017 when he made 24 saves in a 2-0 win over the Minnesota Wild.

"It's nice," Crawford said. "That's the goal, not let any in. But I thought everyone contributed to that. ... We've been waiting a while, kind of forgot what it was like to win there for a bit."

3. Power play breaks through

Finally. After an 0-for-10 drought, the Blackhawks scored a power play goal on their first try of the night and didn't need much time to do it.

Just 35 seconds into a Vladimir Tarasenko hooking penalty, Brent Seabrook cashed in after his shot trickled past Jake Allen and went in off a Blues defenseman's skate to make it 1-0 at 4:05 of the second period. It was the only goal of the game, proving to be the game-winner. 

The Blackhawks finished 1-for-2 in that department against a Blues team that came into the game with a 27.6 percent success rate, which ranked fifth in the NHL.

"It's a good feeling," Seabrook said. "It was nice to hear some music when they came in here after the game tonight. The boys are all fired up. The way we played going into the second period, being able to score a goal, hold onto the lead I think the way everybody played. Everybody stuck with it. Everybody stuck with the game plan. Everybody worked hard. It was a real team effort. ... It took all 20 guys out there tonight to get the job done."

4. Playing the right way leads to results

For six periods in a row, the Blackhawks have been either the better team or it was evenly matched. Giving up two power-play goals in 66 seconds to the Carolina Hurricanes on Monday was basically the difference in that game and special teams played a major role in this one as well. 

Colliton felt like the Blackhawks were, overall, trending in the right direction despite not getting the end results over the previous three games. He got both against the Blues, which was fitting considering the losing streak started vs. St. Louis.

"That was the part of the package that was missing," Colliton said. "Happy for the guys to get rewarded. It’s not a lot of fun to see the results add up. Very happy for the group, they battled really hard, especially in the third when the game was on the line. We found a way to get some pucks out and win some 50-50s and got a couple saves and hopefully that relieves a little bit of the tension in the team and they can play a little more free. Because we’ve been talking about it, but it’s easier said than done."