Blackhawks

Hawks' Hossa to rejoin team after bittersweet week

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Hawks' Hossa to rejoin team after bittersweet week

Friday, Sept. 16, 2011Posted: 3:25 p.m.
By Tracey Myers
CSNChicago.com Blackhawks InsiderFollow @TraMyersCSNMarian Hossa will miss the first few days of Blackhawks training camp, as he attended the memorial of good friend Pavol Demitra, who was killed in the Lokomotiv plane crash last week.It was a bittersweet week for Hossa. He and his wife Jana welcomed their first child, a girl, on Friday; daughter Mias birth was two days after the Lokomotiv tragedy.Marians gone through a tough time; its a tough situation for him to deal with (Demitras death). We certainly want to give him the time to be ready and our thoughts are with him, general manager Stan Bowman said. Its tough losing a close friend. It was a terrible tragedy. Its not an easy time for him but hell be here soon.Sharp mendingPatrick Sharp will miss training camp after having that emergency appendectomy on Monday, and Bowman didnt want to put a date on when Sharp will play his first game.But Bowman isnt worried about Sharp being ready when hes healed.Its better to get it out of the way now. I wouldnt say it impacts training camp or the season, Bowman said. In the scheme of things, its minor.Coach Joel Quenneville concurred.We saw last year how quickly he got back at a critical time of year, said Quenneville, referring to Sharps return off a late-season knee injury. Well give him the necessary time. But at the same time, once hes ready to go hell be a big part of our team.Another ToewsJonathan Toews was understandably excited to have brother David, acquired last week, in the Blackhawks fold.Hes got a lot of talent and hes been through a few tough years with injuries, especially those important years where you develop. Hes just looking for an opportunity, Jonathan said. We worked out and skated a lot this summer, and he was pushing me as much as I was him. Who knows where he ends up, but its nice to have him close by and talk him through some things.Bowman said its important to let David develop and be himself, not Toews younger brother.In fairness to him he has to be judged on his own; he has the same last name but its not really fair to make comparisons, Bowman said. (Davids) here to earn a job. Hes still young, still in that group of players; we have a lot in that age category trying to establish themselves in that process.He said itJonathan Toews on hitting a kid in a youth camp last week: Hes OK, just so you know. He shook it off. But it took a while. I thought it was funny because I had a million texts, more than from anything (else) my buddies have seen on the internet. Like Wow, did you learn how to hit in the offseason?Tracey Myers is CSNChicago.com's Blackhawks Insider. Follow Tracey on Twitter @TramyersCSN for up-to-the-minute Hawks information.

Why NHL All-Star Games never get old for Patrick Kane

Why NHL All-Star Games never get old for Patrick Kane

ST. LOUIS — Patrick Kane is in his 13th NHL season and he's participating in his ninth career All-Star Game this weekend, which is the most of any player that's attending. And both of those numbers will continue to go up.

But don't tell Kane that. He may be 31, but he sure doesn't feel like he's the old guy around here.

"I don’t want to be considered the Old Man," Kane said during Thursday's Media Day session. "I’m still only 31 years old. Obviously there’s a lot of young talent in the NHL and a lot of guys I like to watch playing and that I recognize are really good players, so it’s fun to meet them and talk to them and just talk about your seasons and your team and what’s going on around the league. I feel like I’m just another hockey player."

To Kane, he's just another hockey player. But to others around the league, he's more than that.

Twenty of the 44 All-Stars this season are participating in their first one and many of them have idolized Kane growing up.

Quinn Hughes, who played with Kane for Team USA at the 2019 IIHF World Championship, is one of them. Even as a defenseman, Hughes watched Kane every chance he would get as a kid.

"Yeah, thanks Quinn," Kane said with a smile. "I feel a little bit older now, so thanks."

But even though Kane is one of the older players here, he doesn't take it for granted. He attends every year because it's a good opportunity to represent the Blackhawks and the NHL, and it's also a chance to pay it forward.

“I can remember Joe Thornton being in the locker room, that was pretty cool to see him,” Kane said of who he was excited to meet at his first All-Star appearance. “I remember when I was in Ottawa, I was preparing for that little breakaway challenge ... and I had to go to the rink that morning to practice some of it and see how it’d all come together. And I remember [Pavel] Datsyuk coming to the rink as well and he got on the bike and just worked out. It was just me and him on this big bus and then whoever else we had with us.”

Each All-Star Game stands out for Kane. And now he’s looking to create more memories.

On Friday, Kane will participate in the “Shooting Stars Challenge,” where players will shoot pucks at a variety of targets from the stands. It’s the first time the NHL is incorporating this event into the competition.

On Saturday, Kane hopes to be on the winning side of the 3-on-3 All-Star Game because the Central Division has yet to win it since the format changed in 2016. 

“All of them have their own memories,” Kane said. “You look back on Montreal was my first one, Ottawa had the Superman thing, LA was the top 100, even Columbus we had like five of us there, or six of us. Each of them have their own memory. It’s one of things where, when you’re done playing, you look back and say, ‘I went to this many All-Star Games.’ That’s where my head’s at right there.”

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Blackhawks Talk Podcast: Wayne Messmer on the most memorable anthem rendition in Hawks history

Blackhawks Talk Podcast: Wayne Messmer on the most memorable anthem rendition in Hawks history

During a trying time in America's history the NHL All-Star game in 1991 was set to start. Singer Wayne Messmer delivered one of the most memorable renditions of the anthem Chicago has ever seen and showed a tradition at Blackhawks games that still goes on today. NBC Sports producer Slavko Bekovic is in for host Pat Boyle as he talks with Wayne Messmer about that night that.
 
(1:02) - Wayne Messmer's anthem rendition in 1991
 
(4:32) - When did Messmer start singing?
 
(8:50) - Hard to not let the emotions overtake you while your singing
 
(11:18) - Wayne's anthem was the introduction to the world about the Hawks tradition
 
(14:12) - Lead up to the All-Star game
 
(17:05) - After finishing Messmer got really emotional
 
(19:40) - The impact the anthem had on fans
 
(22:50) - Messmer will always love hockey

You can listen right here or in the embedded player below: