Blackhawks

Jonathan Toews gets rewarded, scores 'ugly one' to snap goal drought

Jonathan Toews gets rewarded, scores 'ugly one' to snap goal drought

Jonathan Toews has seemingly been through it all during his 10-year NHL career.

He wasn't going to let a 13-game goal drought prevent him from playing any differently, but even the greats can squeeze their sticks a little bit too hard when things aren't going their way offensively.

The Blackhawks captain got back on the scoresheet for the first time since Nov. 6 thanks to some puck luck, when he tapped home what appeared to be a shot from Artemi Panarin. The goal extended Panarin's point streak to a career-long seven games with the assist and gave the Blackhawks a 1-0 lead on the power play midway through the second period.

It took a while for the goal to be announced to the United Center crowd of 21,918 because it was unclear whether Panarin's shot hit an Avalanche defender and ricocheted in.

But it was Toews who was ultimately credited with the goal even though it may have gone in without his help.

"Like I've been saying it was a matter of time," Toews said following a 2-1 overtime loss to the Colorado Avalanche on Friday night. "It was an ugly one. I probably stole that one from Bread Man but I think he's had his fair share of one-timers on the power play. It was nice to feel one and see it go in. It always helps the confidence no matter what.

"Unfortunately we couldn't feed off it and get some more the way we needed it tonight. It sucks we came up short."

[SHOP: Gear up, Blackhawks fans!]

It was only Toews' third point in his last 11 games, but perhaps the puck bouncing in your favor is a sign of good things to come.

He helped create his luck, too, after registering a team-high seven shots on goal. The Blackhawks also controlled 53.1 percent of the even-strength shot attempts, according to naturalstattrick.com, when he was on the ice.

"(He was) around the net, Jonny scored a goal so that'll help him going forward," Quenneville said of Toews' game. "He had the puck a lot. Some of those shots, traffic or not, the shots around the net are a little more dangerous. But usually he's around the net, kind of like (Artem Anisimov).

"The other guys are usually feeding him in that area. Toews is probably more effective around the net and getting those greasy goals like he got tonight."

Toews has now scored a goal in each of his last four games against Colorado, dating back to the 2015-16 season. In their first meeting this season, he scored the first goal that turned out to be the game-winner, and followed that up by lighting the lamp in his next two games.

Perhaps the flood gates will open up after the Blackhawks return from a three-day Christmas break.

In Tuesday's game against the Ottawa Senators, Toews had a prime opportunity to bat the puck in on a wide-open net but it sailed high. He stared at the heavens for a second or two after it happened while play around him continued on.

On Friday, the hockey gods rewarded him for sticking with it.

Jonathan Toews releases powerful statement on George Floyd's death, mass protests

Jonathan Toews releases powerful statement on George Floyd's death, mass protests

Chicago athletes — both former and current, including Michael Jordan — have been speaking out following the death of George Floyd and the mass protests that ensued over the weekend. Jonathan Toews joined that group on Monday, sharing a powerful statement on Instagram.

Here's what the Blackhawks captain had to say:

View this post on Instagram

A lot of people may claim these riots and acts of destruction are a terrible response. I’ll be the first to admit that as a white male that was also my first reaction. But who am I to tell someone that their pain is not real? Especially when it is at a boiling point and impossible to hold in anymore. It’s obviously coming from a place of truth. This reaction isn’t coming out of thin air. I’m not condoning or approving the looting, but are we really going to sit here and say that peaceful protesting is the only answer? There has been plenty of time for that, and if it was the answer we would’ve given it our full attention long ago. Listen to these two men debate. They are lost, they are in pain. They strived for a better future but as they get older they realize their efforts may be futile. They don’t know the answer of how to solve this problem for the next generation of black women and men. This breaks my heart. I can’t pretend for a second that I know what it feels like to walk in a black man’s shoes. However, seeing the video of George Floyd’s death and the violent reaction across the country moved me to tears. It has pushed me to think, how much pain are black people and other minorities really feeling? What have Native American people dealt with in both Canada and US? What is it really like to grow up in their world? Where am I ignorant about the privileges that I may have that others don’t? Compassion to me is at least trying to FEEL and UNDERSTAND what someone else is going through. For just a moment maybe I can try to see the world through their eyes. Covid has been rough but it has given us the opportunity to be much less preoccupied with our busy lives. We can no longer distract ourselves from the truth of what is going on. My message isn’t for black people and what they should do going forward. My message is to white people to open our eyes and our hearts. That’s the only choice we have, otherwise this will continue. Let’s choose to fight hate and fear with love and awareness. Ask not what can you do for me, but what can I do for you? Be the one to make the first move. In the end, love conquers all. #blacklivesmatter

A post shared by Jonathan Toews (@jonathantoews) on

A lot of people may claim these riots and acts of destruction are a terrible response. I’ll be the first to admit that as a white male that was also my first reaction.

But who am I to tell someone that their pain is not real? Especially when it is at a boiling point and impossible to hold in anymore. It’s obviously coming from a place of truth. This reaction isn’t coming out of thin air.

I’m not condoning or approving the looting, but are we really going to sit here and say that peaceful protesting is the only answer? There has been plenty of time for that, and if it was the answer we would’ve given it our full attention long ago.

Listen to these two men debate. They are lost, they are in pain. They strived for a better future but as they get older they realize their efforts may be futile. They don’t know the answer of how to solve this problem for the next generation of black women and men. This breaks my heart.

I can’t pretend for a second that I know what it feels like to walk in a black man’s shoes. However, seeing the video of George Floyd’s death and the violent reaction across the country moved me to tears. It has pushed me to think, how much pain are black people and other minorities really feeling? What have Native American people dealt with in both Canada and US? What is it really like to grow up in their world? Where am I ignorant about the privileges that I may have that others don’t?

Compassion to me is at least trying to FEEL and UNDERSTAND what someone else is going through. For just a moment maybe I can try to see the world through their eyes. Covid has been rough but it has given us the opportunity to be much less preoccupied with our busy lives. We can no longer distract ourselves from the truth of what is going on.

My message isn’t for black people and what they should do going forward. My message is to white people to open our eyes and our hearts. That’s the only choice we have, otherwise this will continue.

Let’s choose to fight hate and fear with love and awareness. Ask not what can you do for me, but what can I do for you? 
Be the one to make the first move. In the end, love conquers all.

#blacklivesmatter

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Blackhawks' Zack Smith issues statement following death of George Floyd, protests

Blackhawks' Zack Smith issues statement following death of George Floyd, protests

On Monday, Blackhawks forward Zack Smith tweeted out a statement in the wake of George Floyd's death and the mass protests that ensued over the weekend.



Smith's full message read: 

"As a privileged white man playing in the NHL (a predominately white league) I feel it's as important now as ever to show support for the black community and encourage change. If you think the current way black people and other minorities are treated here today is ok.... you are a racist. If you don't have an opinion or are 'neutral' on this subject then you are ignorant and very misinformed. 

"I strongly disagree with rioting and looting of homes and small businesses but if you resent this movement because of the actions of a few vandals then you are missing the point entirely. As hockey players we sometimes come off as robots in our interviews and stay clear of opinions on most social issues and controversy. 

"Personally I don't like posting my opinions on social media these days for several reason(s). However with the amount of racist people (especially those in positions of power) being exposed during this movement I felt the need to show my support for the black community and the need for change. Please be safe and take care of each other out there."

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