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All-Star Roundup: Chicago backcourt raring to go

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All-Star Roundup: Chicago backcourt raring to go

Saturday, Feb. 19, 2011Posted: 5:40 p.m. Updated: 9:08 p.m.

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

LOS ANGELESAmidst all the hoopla and hullabaloo of the NBAs All-Star weekend, one Derrick Martell Rose remains unchanged. This isnt Chicago, where hes a hometown hero, but the surprisingly large smatterings of Rose jerseys in downtown L.A.and Bulls gear, in generalshows that the third-year guard has become a nationwide phenomenon, despite his low-key persona.

Its very exciting, being here at a young age, just going through this experience. Its great, I appreciate it and I feel blessed to be here, Rose said of the experience Saturday afternoon at the Los Angeles Convention Center, following practice for Sundays game. More appearances, more media, everything. I just have to get used to it now. Everything is going all right.

Its fun, just being here with my family, with my friends, just walking around, going shopping and stuff like that. So, its been all right.

As the starting point guard for the star-studded Eastern Conference team, Rose plans on distributing the ball to the likes of LeBron James, Dwight Howard, Amare Stoudemire and fellow Chicagoan Dwyane Wade, all big-time finishers.

Thats going to be crazy. We have a lot of other great players on our team, too, but I think that our starting five is just crazy, where anybody can just get it and push it up the courtexcept for Dwightbut it should be an exciting game. It should be very competitive, said Rose. My job is to pass the ball. I dont have to score in this game. Ive got a lot of great scorers on my team. Were going to play an up-tempo type game and its just going to be fun.

While Rose clearly plays a game that appeals to fans, he insists he doesnt truly grasp how to excel in a more exhibition-type setting.

Ive been in a couple all-star games, at any level, but Ive never won MVP or something like that. I dont know why. Its fun playing in them, but its just a regular game to me, said Rose.

Instead, Roses goal for Sunday mirrors what he does for the Bulls on most nights: Win. Try to do anything to win.

Just pass the ball, push the ball up the court, pass it ahead, do whatever, he continued. You do think about it entertaining the fans, but you do want to win. Trust me. Just being on that team last year, the way the guys were coming back to the huddle and seeing the way they were talking about defense and offense, they want to win that game.

Thats the biggest thing, winning this game.

Rose did acknowledge that his natural game will probably have spectators on their feet, whether at the Staples Center or in their living rooms.

I think the way that I play is an exciting way. A lot of moves that I do are exciting to some people, he admitted. Bringing that to the game, I know its going to be fun.

Regardless of what he tells the media, dont be shocked if Rose gives a little extra effort to make up for his inaugural All-Star appearance last year, when he wasnt completely healthy and received scant playing time.

I was very hurt, but I had to play. Somehow, I had to play in that game, no matter what, said Rose, who added that hes approaching this years contest as if it was his debut All-Star Game. Thats the way Im looking at it right now, where Im going to have an opportunity to play a lot of minutes and just try to take advantage of those minutes because of last year.

Rose briefly touched on his strategy for Saturday nights Taco Bell Skills Challenge (he won the event in 2009), in which hell compete against New Orleans Hornets point guard Chris Paul, Washington Wizards point guard John Wall, Oklahoma City Thunder point guard Russell Westbrook and Golden State Warriors point guard Stephen Curry.

Its going to be hard. The passing is hard. Youve just got to stay focused and try to make the right passes at the right time, explained Rose. You cant speed through the thing because youll end up messing up. Youve just got to take your time.

Looking ahead, Rose also talked about the impending return of center Joakim Noah following the All-Star break and how it would benefit the Bulls, particularly in transition and when opposing defenses key in on him.

Jo is a guy that, sometimes you see him pushing the break sometimes, handling the ball and I think another thing that hes going to bring to our team is his passing. Thats going to help our team, said Rose. Now, when teams double team comeKurt Thomas and those guys, theyve been doing a great jobbut Jo, he does a great job, too, and he can finish at the rim sometimes, if theyre playing his passing too well.

Rivers touts Rose as early MVP favorite

Eastern Conference head coach Doc Rivers joked about playing Roseas well as Orlandos Howard and Miamis trio of James, Wade and Chris Bosh47 minutes each Sunday, while playing his own quartet of Celtics (Ray Allen, Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Rajon Rondo) a minute apiece.

Rivers got serious, however, when discussing the Bulls and specifically Rose.

The Bulls have the MVP. They do. Derrick Rose, in my opinionright now, if I had to votehes the MVP of the league, said Rivers. When you have one on your team, especially with all the other guys and what Thibs is doing, theyre right in there. They can beat us and we can beat them. Its going to be tough.

Still, although hes partial to former Celtics assistant Tom Thibodeau, Rivers somewhat surprisingly gave his midseason coach of the year vote to another coach with Chicago ties.

Thibs is always the Coach of the Year because hes my favorite guy, said Rivers. But actually, I would probably vote for current Philadelphia 76ers and former Bulls head coach Doug Collins, as crazy as that sounds. But Thibs would be right up there, too.

Rivers, a native of Maywood, Ill.just on the outskirts of Chicagoalso discussed coaching a starting All-Star backcourt consisting of two Windy City natives.

You know, I didnt even think about that," said Rivers. "Thats going to be pretty cool. That is good. Theyre both very athletic. We talk about it all the time, me and D-Wade, and now Rose, same thing. Chicago guys, they all stick together, they all know where each other are from and its just really neat. I think that its the best city, as far as basketball.

Wade honored Chicago backcourt to start for East

Unlike Rivers, Wade was more than aware of the significance of two Chicagoansboth South Sidersstarting in the East backcourt.

Its great for our city, for Chicagoa great city that doesnt get as much pub as other citiesto look and see that weve got two guys that start in the All-Star Game in the backcourt, said Wade, a graduate of Richards High School in Chicagos south suburbs. Rose has figured it out. Hes figured out how good he can be in this league and hes a bonafide All-Star for many, many years to come. I didnt know Derrick growing up in Chicago, but as a Chicago guy, I know how tough it is, how rough it is to grow up there, but Im proud of him and Im happy for him.

I know itll be dynamic. When I look out there before the game, Im going to say something to him, to look and see, This is big for where we come from, he continued. To have two guys from Chicago starting in the backcourt of the All-Star Game, thats an honor. We represent a lot of guys from Chicago thats going to be back there looking at this game, thats happy and excited for both of us. I will make sure I mention that to him and let him know that this is an honor for us to be here together, and Im glad that we could do it.

Wade also touched on his brief summer dalliance with the Bulls during free agency last offseason, when he considered pairing up with Rose and returning to his hometown.

Of course I broke it down to see would it work with both of us in the backcourt, with two guys that need the ball a lot, two guys that arent necessarily as proven shooters as other guys. But then I thought, Man, it would be dynamic, as well," said Wade. "Two guys that can break a defense down, two guys that can finish, etc. And then being my hometown."

That kid Rose is going to be great for a long time and you dont get the chance to play with too many great point guards too much," the 2010 All-Star Game MVP added. "That was very tempting to me.

Bulls legend impressed with Bulls, Noah

CSNChicago.com briefly caught up with former Bulls legend Artis Gilmore, who is in town for the festivities. The 7-foot-4 Gilmore still keeps up with the Bulls and is optimistic about their chances this season.

With Derrick Rose and with the addition of Carlos Boozerof course he started off injuredI think theyre playing extremely well right now and with Joakim Noah getting healthy, theyve got a chance to really excel and have success, Gilmore told CSNChicago.com. Certainly, nobody gave them an opportunity to pass the Celtics, the Magic and Miami, but I think theyre right there.

Gilmore is impressed with the development of Noah, likely the Bulls best at his position since his own playing days.

Jo has really developed and grown. He has really improved. Hes turned into an outstanding athlete, said Gilmore. I watched him in the 2009 first-round playoff series when they had an opportunity to beat Boston and they came up a little short, but they took them to a seven-game series. I watched the same sequence and saw his growth, where he would miss a layup in Noahs rookies season and in his second year, he really took it with force and the ball would go in. Every possession counts so much in the playoffs.

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.com's Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

The Pecking Order: A Bulls Outsider's perspective on Mark Giangreco's diss

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NBC Sports Chicago

The Pecking Order: A Bulls Outsider's perspective on Mark Giangreco's diss

Bulls fans, I thought I’d change things up this time. Honestly, it’s hard to come up with new thoughts on the Bulls as they’re stuck in a rut of beating bad teams and losing to good ones.

Remember the scene in The Lion King when Mufasa gets trampled by a herd of wildebeest? And later, much like the ghost of Hamlet’s father appears to his son, Mufasa emerges from the clouds and shows himself to a now older Simba. Unlike the Ghost in Hamlet, Mufasa doesn’t return to instruct his son to seek revenge. (Although he probably should have, Scar was an a**hole. Scar is Claudius, by the way. Shakespeare essentially wrote The Lion King.) No. Mufasa returned simply to remind Simba of who he was. “You have forgotten who you are, and so forgotten me.”

I bring this up because it’s where my mind wandered after experiencing a frustrating and enlightening day in my life as an “outsider” who’s both excitedly and warily becoming more of an “insider” in the world of Chicago sports media.

Stick with me. It’s the Pecking Order.

During one of his regular appearances on the Waddle & Silvy radio show, Chicago broadcasting legend Mark Giangreco mentioned Bulls Outsiders in a less than flattering light. He questioned if NBC Sports Chicago even pays us to do the show (they do), adding that the network green-lit the show “…in lieu of hiring people with actual talent.”

The following day, after Big Dave, John and myself gave Giangreco some friendly comebacks and due respect on Outsiders, he went back on Waddle & Silvy to accept our olive branch and explain why he didn’t originally love our show.

“Just the concept pissed me off because I’m the old guard,” he said. “I’m trying to protect people who’ve been in the business for a long time.”

I completely understand why Mark was pissed. A trio of random fans were given their own show on a sports network when real broadcasting talents – his friends – who deserve jobs were out of work. In a very real way, that may come across to those dedicated to the business as obtuse and disrespectful.

But you know what? Even though I haven’t yet earned respect from Mark directly, his disrespect of me and my team pissed me off, too.

I know that as I type this, I’m nowhere close to significant in this city’s unparalleled sports media landscape. We’re a tiny blip on the radar. But just becoming the tiniest blip on that radar took six long years of hard work, often for little or no pay to without even a sliver of hope that it would lead to something real.

But I stuck with it. I kept working. And I earned my way onto Outsiders. None of it was given to me. Nor was it given to my co-hosts.

Does Mark Giangreco have the extensive comedy training and experience that John Sabine has? In any duel of sports-related humor and quick wit, my money’s on Sabine every time. Go see him perform with his sketch group at Second City, or Improv Shakespeare at iO. He slays, and he makes something very difficult look easy. That’s called talent. It’s the same talent that makes him perfect for our show. As a Chicago transplant, he also brings a true outsider’s perspective to a sports city that can sometimes swallow itself.

Does Mark Giangreco, or anyone else in the Chicago sports media world for that matter, have what Big Dave has? He’s from a family of multi-generational Chicago sports fans that’s uniquely his. The most positive person I’ve ever met, who comes to any conversation – sports or otherwise – with a smile and an appreciation for you being you, before you complain to him about whatever you think warrants complaining. When you think about the often-overpowering negativity of sports fandom, especially in today’s hateful and filter-free Twitterverse, Dave is so refreshingly original. He’s also been producing and hosting multiple podcasts about Chicago sports for years, showcasing his passion and knowledge for the subjects. That’s called talent.

When they brought the three of us together during screen tests, it clicked. We had concept, chemistry and unbridled enthusiasm. We couldn’t wait to share it with our fellow fans.

So yeah, it bugged me to hear Mark say that we didn’t deserve this show. Does he watch every minute of every Bulls game like we do? Has he been co-hosting a Bulls podcast that does five episodes a week for the past three years, including offseason months? Did his Bulls podcast get well over a million downloads last year? Or was that the work of me and my dedicated Locked On Bulls co-host Jordan Maly? Jordan’s incredible production work on that podcast landed him a job as a producer at 670 The Score. That podcast is what got NBC’s attention to bring me in for Outsiders.

We all started as fans, yes. Now we’re more than that.

Does that piss certain people off? Do younger, eager-to-work professionals getting opportunities in a rapidly changing but always competitive sports media world piss people off? Are we upsetting some pre-existing balance that required the proper broadcasting or journalism degrees to walk the one and only path to working in this in industry? Are we changing the definition of “professional” with our blogs and podcasts and Twitter threads? Is the old way of sports reporting being aggressively phased out?

The answer to all those questions is yes. But here’s the rub: change doesn’t mean forgetting the past. It just means a new way of doing things.

Outsiders is a fresh idea, but also an obvious one. Give “fans” who are also somewhat “professionals” a platform to interact with other fans and, most importantly, give fans at home the opportunity to voice their opinions in real time via social media. That’s the world we live in now. That’s what sports fans want. Connectivity.

When I was a child of the ‘90s, I watched my Bulls every night in standard definition on a 30-inch tube TV, and then watched the best 20 highlights of the day on SportsCenter hosted by Robin Roberts and Bob Ley. I’d read the newspaper columns by Sam Smith and Melissa Isaacson analyzing yesterday’s games every morning before school. Because that’s what we had.

We have access to more now. A lot more. Shouldn’t a sports fan’s desires, and the media system that feeds them those desires, change accordingly? I think it should.

But I don’t think it should erase the history of how we got here. I’ve read countless books about the evolution of sports reporting and broadcasting from the people who dedicated their lives to the craft. I watch film of broadcasters I admire and read every column of the journalists who motivate me to write. I have the utmost respect for those who laid the foundation for the complex world of sports media, and those who followed in their footsteps.

Many of the men and women I watched and read covering my favorite teams as a kid are still working today, some still here in Chicago. The storytellers. And they are my heroes. They’re a huge part of the reason I fell in love with sports. It took me a while to figure it out, but that’s what I wanted to be a part of and I couldn’t possibly have achieved any of the meager things I have thus far without the endless inspiration of their stories.

Some may be nearing the latter chapters of their storied careers finding it bitterly hard to believe how much their industry has changed in just the last few years. Just maybe, they might think about what it looked like when they first started or when they were the kids reading and watching. Typewriters in newsrooms, sports fans huddled around radios, athletes smoking cigarettes in dugouts and locker rooms. Times change. The ways change. It’s natural. But every generation creates and influences the next. The circle of life, if you will.

The changing of the media guard in a great sports city like ours has absolutely nothing derisive about it. Us younger folks are not Scars, guiltlessly throwing Mufasas into the gorge while meticulously planning our takeover of a kingdom with hyena lackeys in tow. We’re just the wildebeest stampeding through the gorge. We don’t know where we’re going, or who’s leading the charge. Some casualties may occur. Because like a stampede of wildebeest, today’s fresh faces of sports media are occasionally confused but always aggressive and eager to get somewhere. Blame us if you want to, we’re just trying to keep our momentum to not be trampled ourselves.

But perhaps more fittingly, there’s a part of us that is more Simba than wildebeest. Lost in the wilderness, lacking direction. Carelessly tweeting “Hakuna Matata” to our warthog and meerkat friends, but secretly yearning for the leadership and guidance of the all-knowing figures who explain the universe to us in a way that makes sense. Crying out to a slowly disappearing ghost, “No, please, don’t leave me!”

I’m not trying to kill Mufasa. I’m just a young wildebeest who might inadvertently trample him. Maybe I’m Simba, too. Scared as hell to take the mantle of the predecessors who created, explained and ruled the world in which I grew.

If someone takes a shot at me or my people, I’m going to stand my ground and fight for my tribe. And if somebody takes that shot from a position of ignorance, opting to learn nothing about me and my tribe before firing it, you better believe I’m throwing some salt on the ground that lies between my tribe and theirs.. But I understand that that instinct of mine is the instinct that lives within all of us: to protect what we hold dear. It’s the same instinct that caused somebody older and much more accomplished than me to say what they said. That instinct never goes away, it only grows and intensifies. The longer and harder you’ve worked for something, the farther you’re willing to go to protect it. I understand that too. And I’m not that far along compared to many.

All I can do is promise to try my best with every opportunity I’m given. I can wait to be king. I don’t even know if I want to be king. But if I ever get there, it won’t be without remembering the lessons of the sports media royalty who came before me.

If I get there, it will be because of everything they taught me, and everything they did for me, along with my own hard work. And I’ll pay it forward to those who are ready to take my place someday. I’ll try to appreciate the passion behind their hard work instead of resisting the stampeding change.

I’m sure it won’t be easy for me either. Nonetheless, the circle keeps spinning. A steady but always evolving group of storytellers for a kingdom that appreciates its rich history. That’s what we must always provide. Because that’s what Chicago sports fans deserve.

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How the Lauri Markkanen injury sets back the Bulls' season and rebuild

How the Lauri Markkanen injury sets back the Bulls' season and rebuild

Lauri Markkanen badly wanted to play all 82 games this season.

He stated that goal publicly at last September’s media day. He told many people privately how much it would mean to him after missing a combined 44 games over his first two seasons. It’s a big reason why he played through oblique and left ankle issues this season.

With everything else crumbling around him — the Bulls’ playoff chances, his All-Star chances — it represented a noble pursuit that could help the franchise.

That goal came crashing down with Friday’s bombshell news that Markkanen will miss four to six weeks after an MRI exam revealed an early stress reaction of his right pelvis.

This latest injury falls on top of promising rookie Daniel Gafford sitting with a dislocated right thumb, Wendell Carter Jr. still weeks away from returning after a severely sprained right ankle and Otto Porter Jr. not playing since Nov. 6 with a foot fracture.

There are so many ramifications to Markkanen’s latest setback that it’s hard to know where to begin. But this is a start: Since management plunged into a full rebuild with the June 2017 trade of Jimmy Butler, Markkanen and Zach LaVine have played just 106 of 210 games together.

Extrapolating the missed games angle further, LaVine, Carter, Porter and Markkanen have played just nine of 74 games together since the Bulls acquired Porter via trade last February.

To be clear: This is no way to judge a rebuild.

Thad Young will start at power forward in Markkanen’s absence. Forgotten man Denzel Valentine could rejoin the rotation.

But make no mistake: Even with Porter hoping to play after the All-Star break and Markkanen hopeful to return after missing 10 to 17 games, this is a massive setback. It further clouds how to judge the core pieces the Bulls counted on to return them to relevancy as soon as this season.

Players will return out of rhythm and out of sync. There is limited practice time down the stretch of the season, particularly when the Bulls’ brutal close to the schedule is considered. It may not even really matter what the Bulls do in the short-term — how the rotation shakes out, how much LaVine can still carry the offense — because this season is headed to lost cause status.

Again.

The Bulls absolutely need to still listen to any trade interest involving Young, even though his role will increase. He’s a valuable piece, added to bring leadership, durability, solid play and veteran savvy to help the current core.

But he won’t be here in three years if Markkanen and LaVine reach the ceilings the Bulls need them to for this rebuild to work.

"We take this opportunity to develop our roster," coach Jim Boylen said. "Some next man has to step up. We keep trying to play hard and play the right way. This happens in our league. It's part of the business."

Boylen wouldn't bite on long-term ramifications for the state of the rebuild. He said he wouldn't "go there" when asked if this season is another lost opportunity.

"We're building something. I want our defense to be good, I want our shot profile to be what it is — very good," Boylen said. "I want us to improve our defensive rebounding and defend without fouling. I'm not deterred one bit. I'm disappointed for him. But I'm not deterred in the least bit. As painful as it is, this is an opportunity for somebody else to establish themself. I like that part of the league.

"I'd be dishonest if I didn't say it's frustrating, for all of us. For John [Paxson], for Jerry and Michael [Reinsdorf], it's frustrating. But it's spilled milk, man. We gotta move on and make the guys we can better and hope the guys get back soon. We're not going to wallow in this. We have to move forward. And we will."

Markkanen, whose ankle also will get a chance to heal, vowed to return stronger. But another ramification to the injury: This makes Markkanen's looming negotiations for an extension of his rookie contract this summer even more difficult. He remains under Bulls' rights even if one isn't reached.

"I really wanted to play," he said. "But at the same time, I had to take a step back and think what's actually smart. I think they made a good decision. I agree it could get worse."

Markkanen was speaking about his situation, not the rebuild. We think.

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