Bulls

Bulls' approach reflected in Thibodeau's intensity

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Bulls' approach reflected in Thibodeau's intensity

As one might expect, Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau is taking Monday's record-setting defensive performance against Atlanta in stride.

RELATED: Bulls set franchise record in victory over Hawks

"If you have a good win, it doesnt mean you have it all figured out. You have to understand why you win and why you lose and make the necessary corrections. Even when you win, theres a lot you have to do better. Usually when you lose, youre more aware. It shouldnt be that way," Thibodeau told reporters after the team's Tuesday afternoon practice at the Berto Center.

"When you win, human nature is when you feel good, thats usually when youre headed for a fall. We want to approach everything the same way, have discipline, be focused, concentrate on improvement, not skip any steps."

It was a typical response from Thibodeau, who presents a constantly even-keeled approach to the media, in contrast to his intense sideline demeanor during games, not to mention a reported tirade directed at his players during Monday's shootaround, addressing their lack of consistency, particular at the United Center.

MORE: Thibodeau's pregame message strikes chord with Bulls

But while his players acknowledged their coach's motivational tactics -- Joakim Noah did so, in humorous fashion, in the aftermath of the Bulls' historic smothering of Atlanta's offense -- that didn't mean it was anything out of the ordinary.

"Were used to it. Hes very emotional. He takes getting us ready very seriously," veteran point guard Kirk Hinrich, playing for Thibodeau for the first season in his return to the Bulls. "We as professionals want the same thing. As individuals, we have to make sure were ready to play."

Thibodeau himself also insisted that the evening's result wasn't simply a carry-over effect from the morning session, but a product of better preparation and attention to detail.

"I dont think it was that. They were ready to approach the game in a different manner. I thought readiness to play was important for us. Usually with this team, when we practice well we play well. We had some slippage. When you dont have the opportunity to practice, theres going to be some slippage. You still have to have the ability to make corrections, concentrate and be ready to play. That was the main point of emphasis," he explained.

"Thats part of coaching. As you see things, you have to point them out. I see my job is to tell them the truth as I see it. Each day for us to improve, we have to know the things were not doing well, how we can correct it. Sometimes you do it through film. Sometimes meeting. Sometimes its practice. And sometimes its all three."

Whatever the case, Thibodeau's corrections worked, manifesting themselves in a stellar defensive outing, a tribute to the coach's defense-first philosophy.

Carlos Boozer says Nate Robinson was one of his favorite teammate because 'he would bring snacks to every flight'

Carlos Boozer says Nate Robinson was one of his favorite teammate because 'he would bring snacks to every flight'

Carlos Boozer and Nate Robinson only played one season together with the Bulls. But oh, what a memorable campaign it was.

And it produced a friendship that still lasts to this day. Cupcakes and snacks will do just that.

Boozer retold a story to NBC Sports Chicago on Tuesday of Robinson and his daughter, Navyi, baking cupcakes for Bulls players on road trips.

"We had so much fun. Me and Nate hit it off right away," Boozer said. "We're both very animated, we're both very loud, we talk a lot, we're great teammates. We love playing passionately, we compete.

"Nate is one of the best teammates I ever had. I played my whole life, I've been playing a long time and he's the only teammate that would bring snacks to every flight. And we'd travel on the road, he would bake us cupcakes for every road game. I never had that before.

"Him and his daughter, Navyi, would bake the cupcakes before every road game. So every road game we'd get to the plane and Nate would hook us up with cupcakes.

"Just a great teammate. He'd go through a brick wall for you, never complained, practice every day, play every day, ready to come and give it his best."

Boozer and Robinson will face off against each other during the Big3 Tournament, which begins this weekend in Houston. The league will travel to Chicago and the United Center on June 29.

"I'm looking forward to being in Chicago," Boozer said. "We've got a lot of great fans out there. I miss the (United Center), miss that Chicagotime summer weather and looking forward to getting back out there in a couple weeks."

Boozer's Ghost Ballers and Robinson's Tri-State team won't square off against one another until Week 5 in Miami. But it's sure to be a fun matchup for the two friends and snack buddies.

"He's one of my brothers, one of my closest friends," Boozer said. "Nate has been training like an animal and he's gonna use this platform to show everybody how much skills he has, also to get back into the NBA. Nate's a great talent and I'm looking forward to seeing him get down."

Boozer's team includes co-captains Mike Bibby and Ricky Davis, which gives them a pretty solid trio heading into the event. But no teammate, NBA or Big3, can match Nate Rob and his cupcakes.

Check out more on the Big3 right here.

Scottie Pippen's injury history sheds light on what could be ahead for Michael Porter Jr.

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USA TODAY

Scottie Pippen's injury history sheds light on what could be ahead for Michael Porter Jr.

By now you probably know the story of Michael Porter Jr.'s back. Right as his college basketball career was starting—two minutes in to be exact—he had to sit out with back pain, which eventually developed into Porter undergoing a microdiscectomy of the L3-L4 spinal discs. The general consensus has been simple: if Porter's medicals are clean then he is a potential top-five pick, but if there is a lack of medical information or any indication that lingering issues persist, he will be available at picks six through the late lottery. Regardless of how his medical records look, what we do know is that Porter was the top-ranked player in his high school class before the eventual re-classification of Marvin Bagley. With this in mind, any team in need of serious star power—hello Bulls!—should have no problems spending a high pick on Porter, and Hall of Famer Scottie Pippen is a big reason why.

In July of 1988, Pippen has disc surgery following a rookie season that was plagued by constant back pain. During that rookie season Pippen played just over 20 minutes a night and played in a total of 79 games.

While the late 80's didn't have the help of NBA Twitter to breathe doubt into fans, there was still a running sentiment that Pippen may not be effective as he was during his initial NBA season. But in his sophomore NBA year, he almost doubled his scoring total while raising his free throw percentage from 57.6 percent to 66.8 percent. On top of this, Pippen also increased his workload by playing 33.1 minutes per game. Altogether he increased his field goal and free throw percentage each of his first four seasons in the league, all following his rookie year back surgery.

This however, should not come as a shock. In an interview with SB Nation, Dr. Charla Fischer, a spine surgeon at NYU Langone Health, stated: "Most patients tell me they feel at least 50 to 80 percent better immediately after the surgery." 

Players typically take two seasons to return to form following herniated disc surgery, and that is right in line with Pippen's first All-Star appearance in 1990, about one and a half seasons following his procedure. When you relate this back to Porter, a clearer picture of what to expect forms. Because Porter has already missed an entire season of basketball (at Missouri), it figures to take about a year for him to totally regain the explosivness that he showcased at the high school level. 

Pippen averaged 14.4 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 2.1 apg, along with a combined 1.9 stl/blks per game in the season following his back procedure. Now it would be unreasonable to expect Porter to come into the NBA performing at that level, but more so because of his lack of all-around polish more than anything else. And that is what makes Porter such a conundrum. He is a player whose game—as of now—is totally based on scoring, and his scoring is directly tied to how close he is to 100 percent. So again, developing the rest of his game in terms of passing and defense will take on everlasting importance, regardless of if he ends up with Chicago or another team. 

And while it is true that Pippen's injury history eventually caught up with him, leading to another back surgery in 1998, this was six NBA championships later. Pip went on to play six more seasons following his 1998 procedure. This included four seasons with Portland where the team routinely won around 50 games, and had a legendary battle with the Los Angeles Lakers in the 2000 Western Conference Finals.

So no matter what, Porter's first year should be looked at as one very, very long training camp. He will be in the best position to succeed if he is selected by a team willing to look at him as a long-term piece, rather than a 6-foot, 11-inch savior.