Bulls

Bulls worthy of any NBA awards?

744200.png

Bulls worthy of any NBA awards?

INDIANAPOLISIn the midst of the final week of the NBAs regular season, its time to decide which players are deserving of league honors. While this writer only has a small say in two awards officially, theres no reason not to opine further.

Most Valuable Player: LeBron James, Miami Heat - Its easy to say that, due to his much-discussed failings in the clutch, let alone having All-Star teammates in Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, James isnt deserving of winning his third MVP award, especially since hes never won a title. But his all-around brilliance this campaign has been too much to ignore, as he impacts every game on both ends of the floor and has dominant stretches that simply overwhelm opponents. While the likes of Kevin Durant and Kobe Bryant, currently locked in a duel for the scoring title, have also been outstanding, they also have terrific teammatesAndrew Bynum has mounted a challenge to Dwight Howard for the title of leagues best center and Russell Westbrook, on certain nights, is the Thunders best playerand neither makes the defensive impact James does.
Coach of the Year: Tom Thibodeau, Chicago Bulls - Watching the Bulls on a nightly basis, its hard not to be biased toward Thibs, but his body of work this season perhaps surpasses even his debut campaign as an NBA head coach, in which he received league top-coaching honors. If the combination of his coaching and Derrick Roses MVP season was an easy explanation for why the Bulls were so good last season, coaching, with a boost from the Bulls deep bench, has to be the reason for the teams success this season, as the starting backcourt of Rose and prized acquisition Rip Hamilton have missed the majority of the campaign, which has again yielded the leagues best record to this point. Other coaches, such as Gregg Popovich in San Antonio, Alvin Gentry of the Suns and Indianas Frank Vogel, also deserve consideration, but none have faced the same challenges. Like the Bulls, the Spurs have basically replicated what they did a year agominus the injuriesPhoenix has truly overachieved with limited talent, though having future Hall of Famer Steve Nash helps, and the Pacers certainly made a big leap, but it wasnt completely unexpected, as they added an influx of talent to a solid young core. Thibodeau may lose out for a variety of reasonsPopovich getting honored to reflect his excellent career, the Bulls mini-slide in April, when some observers start paying attention, and voters simply not wanting to give him unprecedented back-to-back awards so early in his head-coaching tenurebut hes clearly earned it.

Rookie of the Year: Kyrie Irving, Cleveland Cavaliers - This award is perhaps the biggest no-brainer, especially after Minnesotas Ricky Rubio was injured for the season. Irving showed he was worthy of being the top pick and while the Cavs are far from being competitive, the savvy young scoring point guard is a tremendous building block for the franchise to get over its LeBron hangover. That said, before Rubio got hurt, the Timberwolves were contending for a playoff spot, so maybe his absence illustrates how valuable he was.

Defensive Player of the Year: Tyson Chandler, New York Knicks - This was a tough one, as the Thunders Serge Ibaka emerged as a dominant shot-blocker, James defensive prowess is remarkable to witness, pardon the pun, and Philadelphias Andre Iguodala has established himself as the leagues top one-on-one perimeter defender. However, Chandler, the former Bull, showed that his presence was truly impactful by transforming previously porous New York into a solid defensive squad, something which became even more evident when Knicks interim head coach Mike Woodson took over. If anything, it was further testament to his stint in Dallas, where he was, along with reigning Finals MVP Dirk Nowitzki, the key to the Mavericks title run.
Sixth Man of the Year: James Harden, Oklahoma City Thunder - Another close call, but Harden beats out the 76ers Lou Williams. While Williams is his teams leading scorer and Harden is clearly the third option for the Thunder behind Durant and Westbrook, the shooting guard is a player who could start for most squads in the league and likely average over 20 points per game easily if he was made more of an offensive focal point. Unlike Williams, whos basically counted on to solely produce points, Harden is a key playmaker for Oklahoma City, where Westbrooks shoot-first sensibilities have been harped upon ad nauseum, and is perhaps the teams best passer.

Most Improved Player: Greg Monroe, Detroit Pistons - There are also several worthy candidates in this category, but Monroes ascension from solid, if unspectacular rookie, to the Pistons best player has opened eyes, if not changed fortunes in Detroit yet. The obvious pick to many will be Jeremy Lin of the Knicks, but Linsanity was so brief, due to his season-ending knee injury, that its hard to give it to him. Same goes for Houstons Goran Dragic, who was a backup playing behind a borderline All-Star in Kyle Lowry, and only got his chance to shine when Lowry was sidelined. Another similar situation is in Boston, as second-year guard Avery Bradley has made great strides and proved to be a tenacious on-ball defender, but only truly got his opportunity after Ray Allen went down. While the likes of Orlandos Ryan Anderson and Indianas Paul George also have gotten dramatically better, their improvement was foreshadowed at the tail end of last season. Two players, however, who were hard to snub were Minnesota center Nikola Pekovic and the Bucks Ersan Ilyasova, who would be the runner-up, in this writers eyes.

Executive of the Year: Larry Bird, Indiana Pacers - Amid rumors that this would be his final season as the Pacers top executive, the Hall of Fame player completely his home state teams turnaround from the ugly Malice in the Palace incident that led to the decimation of a title contender. Indiana went from a promising eighth seed a year ago to third in the East and a team no upper-echelon squad wants to see in the postseason. The Pacers depth, youth and experiencethe additions of blue-collar veteran David West via free agency and hometown product George Hill in a draft-day trade were underrated moveshave them poised to be a force for years to come. While he doesnt truly challenge Bird for the award, Denvers Masai Ujiri, in the aftermath of last seasons blockbuster trade with the Knicks, deserves some credit for assembling a deep and talented Nuggets team with plenty of flexibility for the future.

All-NBA first team: Kobe Bryant, Lakers; Andrew Bynum, Lakers; Kevin Durant, Thunder; LeBron James, Heat; Rajon Rondo, Celtics

All-NBA second team: Carmelo Anthony, Knicks; Dwight Howard, Magic; Kevin Love, Timberwolves; Chris Paul, Clippers; Russell Westbrook, Thunder

All-NBA third team: Marc Gasol, Grizzlies; Blake Griffin, Clippers; Tony Parker, Spurs; Josh Smith, Hawks; Dwyane Wade, Heat

All-defensive first team: Tyson Chandler, Knicks; Luol Deng, Bulls; Serge Ibaka, Thunder; Andre Iguodala, 76ers; LeBron James, Heat

All-defensive second team: Tony Allen, Grizzlies; Avery Bradley, Celtics; Dwight Howard, Magic; Josh Smith, Hawks; Omer Asik and Taj Gibson, Bulls (tie; cant separate one from the other, though both are deserving)

All-rookie first team: Kenneth Faried, Nuggets; Kyrie Irving, Cavaliers; Ricky Rubio, Timberwolves; Iman Shumpert, Knicks; Isaiah Thomas, Kings

All-rookie second team: MarShon Brooks, Nets; Brandon Knight, Pistons; Markieff Morris, Suns; Chandler Parsons, Rockets; Klay Thompson, Warriors

Draft night highlighted the unfulfilling feeling of this past Bulls season

Draft night highlighted the unfulfilling feeling of this past Bulls season

The door has officially been closed on the 2017-18 season for the Chicago Bulls, and the word that most comes to mind is “unfulfilling.”

Or maybe even “indistinguishable.”

Draft night was supposed to be a culmination of a painful seven-month stretch that only had occasional yet costly moments of light.

Death lineup? Meet Death March. And Death April, while we’re at it.

The Bulls brass sold everyone on a full rebuild after trading Jimmy Butler one year ago, with an unspoken promise that this draft would bear franchise-changing fruit—hence the general feeling of angst or even indifference with the solid selection of Wendell Carter Jr. and their not-so-secret affection of Chandler Hutchison.

It was why fans believe the Bulls got cold feet about trading to move up, and why they believe the Bulls weren’t being pragmatic in staying away from Michael Porter Jr.

Porter, some believe, has star written all over him given his prep ranking this time last year and the Bulls were in position to speed up this process without having to go into a painful Process.

They were desperate for a star, believing the tankathon had produced so much suffering it had to be something on the back end.

There was the fight (or the punch).

The aftermath.

The miserable 3-20 start.

The 14-7 streak that produced the audacity of hope.

The reality that 14-7 was damaging enough to the lottery chances that a 3-11 finish couldn’t rectify.

And finally, the coin flip that cost them five spots in the lottery one month ago.

So that empty feeling has less to do with Carter and Hutchison, who’ve done nothing to earn the “blah” reaction from the fan base and some media. It has everything to do with the unanswered questions over the last 82 games and lack of clarity over the three hauls from draft night last year.

It’s not that Zach LaVine, Lauri Markkanen and Kris Dunn underperformed individually last season, but the lack of cohesiveness due to injuries and circumstances has led to the varying thoughts.

LaVine is approaching restricted free agency and by all accounts is taking his continuing rehab in Washington very seriously.  Markkanen has added plenty of muscle since the offseason began, appearing as if he can play Michael B. Jordan’s in-ring foil in the next installation of “Creed” as Ivan Drago’s long lost son.

And despite the report about Dunn not working as hard on the floor this offseason, that would be more of a concern if this were late August, not June.

The last time they were seen together on the floor, they looked no closer to a pecking order than the day they arrived.

What we know is that they’re productive NBA players, capable of putting an individual tattoo on a game at a moment’s notice, skillful enough to take your breath away.

And for whatever reason, the expectations changed once the three displayed they could be dynamic on their own—a star needed to be anointed and groomed to go with the star they believed was coming their way after the season.

Management is fully behind Markkanen, but Paxson’s strong words about LaVine at the season-ending news conference illustrated how much it feels LaVine has to prove next season.

With his restricted free agency status looming, the Bulls’ initial offer will show how much they value him until and if he gets a better deal on the market.

And the fact the Bulls weren’t afraid to draft Trae Young while having a healthy debate about Collin Sexton on draft night has to show they have at least some skepticism about the future at point guard.

But stars—developing stars, acquired stars, drafted stars—have to do it on their own. No amount of promotion or prodding from management will validate their faith, if that’s the route the Bulls choose to go.

This has to be a meritocracy or it won’t work and, honestly, it’s time for a reality check.

All the worry about the Bulls getting back to title contention sooner rather than later seems like folks getting ahead of themselves.

The front office has taken its share of shots from media and fans, so some questioning is earned but they’re right about one thing. Rebuilds aren’t completed in a day or 12 months.

Expecting some magic potion to arrive in the form of a top draft pick isn’t going to cure what ills this roster, and it doesn’t seem likely all the cap space will result in a free agent choosing the Bulls over the usual suspects.

However, methodical building can look like complacency if not done with a sense of urgency.

And with urgency in mind, this past season was unsatisfying to say the least—heading into the next phase with two more young pieces to develop while the first three are still in the evaluation stage.

Loyola's March Madness hero Donte Ingram will play with Bulls' Summer League team

Loyola's March Madness hero Donte Ingram will play with Bulls' Summer League team

Donte Ingram's 2018 keeps getting better and better.

The March Madness hero, who buried a game-winning 3-pointer in the first round of Loyola's win over Miami, will play on the Bulls' Summer League team.

Ingram, a Simeon Academy graduate, had himself an incredible senior season with the Ramblers, who advanced all the way to the Final Four as a No. 11 seed.

In five NCAA Tournament games Ingram averaged 7.0 points, 5.8 rebounds and 1.6 assists for the Ramblers. He also had 18 points in the MVC Conference Championship Game to secure the Ramblers' March Madness berth.

He'll join first-round draft picks Wendell Carter Jr. and Chandler Hutchison on the Las Vegas Summer League team, which will begin play early next month.