Bulls

How will the Bulls season end?

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How will the Bulls season end?

Sunday, Sept. 26, 2010
10:34 PM

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

A historic summer for the NBA has passed and for the Bulls, while they didn't acquire quite the star power many expected andor hoped for, optimism runs high, both within the organization and throughout the team's fan base. With the offseason coming to an end, the time to fully delve into the upcoming NBA season is here. Instead of a traditional season preview, issues both throughout the league and in Chicago will be probed daily here on CSNChicago.com up until the squad officially convenes for training camp toward the end of September.

19. How will the Bulls' season end?

Heading into the season, there are certainly some unknowns for the Bulls, many of which have been covered recently in this very space. Some of these variables can be predicted to an extent, but others--such as new head coach Tom Thibodeau's performance and team chemistry after an offseason roster overhaul--cannot.

There will obviously be an adjustment to Thibodeau's system, which will surely prioritize defense. Some of the Bulls--namely Carlos Boozer and Derrick Rose--will have to make a shift in their mentality, as the defensive end is perceived to be among their main shortcomings. Boozer, in particular (Rose, 21, is still a very malleable player), will have to work to change his reputation as a poor defender, as sources with knowledge of Thibodeau's thinking tell CSNChicago.com that the coach doesn't plan to double team opposing post players.

The issue of chemistry will also be an ongoing plot line to be observed in the season's early going. None of the Bulls--whether holdovers or newcomers--are specifically known for being a selfish players; rather, the question of a set pecking order and perhaps who will be willing to take a backseat is more pertinent.

After entering last season as the team's go-to scorer, Luol Deng will likely be the team's third option on offense, behind Rose and Boozer. While this may make him a more dangerous threat and be better for the team as a whole, every player has somewhat of an ego and a more-limited role may initially be tough for Deng to swallow.

While Joakim Noah doesn't necessarily require a lot of shots or set plays run for him to be effective (although Noah, an underrated passer, not getting a lot of touches would be a mistake) and the team's supporting cast seemingly having defined roles to play, it will take some time before everybody is comfortable with each other. Furthermore, Thibodeau, despite all of his experience, is still a novice as an NBA head coach (he did have a stint as a college head coach over 20 years ago) and will need to balance his lauded work ethic with delegating to others on his staff.

That said, the Bulls are a fairly balanced and deep group with a lot of weapons and besides outside shooting, not a lot of weaknesses. The holdovers from last season--including Taj Gibson and James Johnson, along with Rose, Noah and Deng--all have playoff experience, as do the majority of the offseason acquisitions.

A so-so start wouldn't be completely unexpected, but as the season goes on, the Bulls should get stronger, find their groove and enter the postseason as a squad to be feared. Becoming a true contender may be too much of a leap, but a five-game increase from last season's win total--in a much tougher Eastern Conference--isn't an impossibility.

As was written in an earlier edition of this series, Milwaukee should be favored to win the Central Division based on success last season, overall team depth, and not having to deviate much from how they played a year ago. Chicago, however, should be in a two-team Central race until the end, garnering a decent playoff seed--if not the top-four East finish many observers expect--and potentially playing spoiler to a higher-seeded team in the first round of the postseason before bowing out in the conference semifinals.

That might not sound satisfying to fans, but with so many variables going into this season, a marked improvement from the 2009-10 campaign bodes well for the future. After all, it's always necessary to crawl before walking.

Chicago Bulls predicted finish: 46-36, fifth in the Eastern Conference (second in the Central Division), second round of the playoffs

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.coms Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

Bulls sign local product Tyler Ulis to two-way deal

Bulls sign local product Tyler Ulis to two-way deal

The NBA preseason has finished and teams are finalizing their rosters before the beginning of the regular season.

For the Bulls, that meant claiming Tyler Ulis off waivers and signing him to a two-way contract.

The Athletic's Shams Charania first reported the move.

Ulis, a product of Marian Catholic High School in Chicago Heights, was waived by the Warriors on Friday. He spent two years at Kentucky before getting drafted in the second round by the Phoenix Suns in 2016.

In two years with the Suns, Ulis made 58 starts and played in 132 games. He averaged just over 7 points per game in both seasons. Last season, Ulis also averaged 4.4 assists per game against 1.8 turnovers in 23.4 minutes per game.

The Suns waived Ulis after the season and the Warriors signed him for the preseason. He averaged 3 points and 1.5 assists per game in four preseason games with the Warriors.

The two-way contract means Ulis could be spending more time with the Windy City Bulls than at the United Center on game days, but backup point guard is a question mark for the Bulls. Cam Payne looks like he will get first crack at the role behind Kris Dunn with Denzel Valentine injured. Ryan Arcidiacono just made the team and could also figure into point guard minutes.

Ryan Arcidiacono's persistence pays off with roster spot inclusion

Ryan Arcidiacono's persistence pays off with roster spot inclusion

Cuts during the NBA preseason aren’t exactly as gut-wrenching and tension-filled as they are in the NFL. NBA teams cut from somewhere in the late teens down to 15, and the potential for two-way contracts exist for those players who don’t make the roster. But for Ryan Arcidiacono, Saturday was filled with angst as he waited for a call. It never came.

“I was thinking about it. It’s like Hard Knocks when you’re watching. You don’t want to get that phone call,” Arcidiacono said Sunday before practice. “I was just thinking to myself after the game (Friday), nobody said anything to me. I was talking to (assistant) Pete (Myers) and he said, ‘Just get outta here, man. I’ll see you at practice on Sunday.’ I was still a little nervous on Friday night. Saturday morning I felt better after I talked to my agent and everything became more official.”

It’s quite the journey for Arcidiacono, who spent time both with the Bulls and their G-League affiliate in Hoffman Estates last season. In 37 starts with the Windy City Bulls, Arcidiacono averaged 13.9 points and 8.5 assists in 39.6 minutes. His two longest stints in Chicago came in late January and at the end of the year, and that 24-game audition was enough for the Bulls to re-sign him in July.

Arcidiacono found more comfort this summer in Year 2 with the Bulls. Though his playing time in the preseason was limited he showed enough in camp to warrant a spot on the roster. It also helped that the Bulls find themselves thin at the point guard position behind Kris Dunn, with Cameron Payne struggling and Denzel Valentine on the mend with an ankle injury.

“I think last year really helped me with the two-way, getting acclimated with what Fred wants to do,” he said. “I think getting up and down with the G League. (Head coach) Charlie (Henry) really helped me a lot. Knowing our point guard situation, I just tried to be the hardest playing guy on the floor anytime I step on and the rest will take care of itself.”

It’s unknown whether Arcidiacono’s stint in Chicago will last. His contract will be guaranteed on January 10. He’s an important body for now with Lauri Markkanen out for the foreseeable future and Valentine still recovering from his own injury. But he’ll also have the opportunity to push Payne for that back-up role. Payne struggled much of the preseason, averaging 4.2 points and 3.2 assists on just 25 percent shooting.

“Arci has done a lot of really good things,” Hoiberg said. “I liked the way he looked in the game the other night off the ball. Defensively, made some really good solid plays and again, when there’s an open man on the court Arci’s gonna find him.”

He won’t move the needle on the Bulls’ season, and his minutes will likely be minimal once the season begins. But for now it’s a great story of persistence that gives the Bulls another hard-working body in practice.”

“Whatever our team needs, that’s what they’ll get from me,” he said. “Whether that’s being a backup or the third point guard spot, I’m just here to compete and make our team better and hopefully get us some victories.”