Bulls

How will the Bulls season end?

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How will the Bulls season end?

Sunday, Sept. 26, 2010
10:34 PM

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

A historic summer for the NBA has passed and for the Bulls, while they didn't acquire quite the star power many expected andor hoped for, optimism runs high, both within the organization and throughout the team's fan base. With the offseason coming to an end, the time to fully delve into the upcoming NBA season is here. Instead of a traditional season preview, issues both throughout the league and in Chicago will be probed daily here on CSNChicago.com up until the squad officially convenes for training camp toward the end of September.

19. How will the Bulls' season end?

Heading into the season, there are certainly some unknowns for the Bulls, many of which have been covered recently in this very space. Some of these variables can be predicted to an extent, but others--such as new head coach Tom Thibodeau's performance and team chemistry after an offseason roster overhaul--cannot.

There will obviously be an adjustment to Thibodeau's system, which will surely prioritize defense. Some of the Bulls--namely Carlos Boozer and Derrick Rose--will have to make a shift in their mentality, as the defensive end is perceived to be among their main shortcomings. Boozer, in particular (Rose, 21, is still a very malleable player), will have to work to change his reputation as a poor defender, as sources with knowledge of Thibodeau's thinking tell CSNChicago.com that the coach doesn't plan to double team opposing post players.

The issue of chemistry will also be an ongoing plot line to be observed in the season's early going. None of the Bulls--whether holdovers or newcomers--are specifically known for being a selfish players; rather, the question of a set pecking order and perhaps who will be willing to take a backseat is more pertinent.

After entering last season as the team's go-to scorer, Luol Deng will likely be the team's third option on offense, behind Rose and Boozer. While this may make him a more dangerous threat and be better for the team as a whole, every player has somewhat of an ego and a more-limited role may initially be tough for Deng to swallow.

While Joakim Noah doesn't necessarily require a lot of shots or set plays run for him to be effective (although Noah, an underrated passer, not getting a lot of touches would be a mistake) and the team's supporting cast seemingly having defined roles to play, it will take some time before everybody is comfortable with each other. Furthermore, Thibodeau, despite all of his experience, is still a novice as an NBA head coach (he did have a stint as a college head coach over 20 years ago) and will need to balance his lauded work ethic with delegating to others on his staff.

That said, the Bulls are a fairly balanced and deep group with a lot of weapons and besides outside shooting, not a lot of weaknesses. The holdovers from last season--including Taj Gibson and James Johnson, along with Rose, Noah and Deng--all have playoff experience, as do the majority of the offseason acquisitions.

A so-so start wouldn't be completely unexpected, but as the season goes on, the Bulls should get stronger, find their groove and enter the postseason as a squad to be feared. Becoming a true contender may be too much of a leap, but a five-game increase from last season's win total--in a much tougher Eastern Conference--isn't an impossibility.

As was written in an earlier edition of this series, Milwaukee should be favored to win the Central Division based on success last season, overall team depth, and not having to deviate much from how they played a year ago. Chicago, however, should be in a two-team Central race until the end, garnering a decent playoff seed--if not the top-four East finish many observers expect--and potentially playing spoiler to a higher-seeded team in the first round of the postseason before bowing out in the conference semifinals.

That might not sound satisfying to fans, but with so many variables going into this season, a marked improvement from the 2009-10 campaign bodes well for the future. After all, it's always necessary to crawl before walking.

Chicago Bulls predicted finish: 46-36, fifth in the Eastern Conference (second in the Central Division), second round of the playoffs

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.coms Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

Bulls core ranked 14th best in the league by The Ringer

Bulls core ranked 14th best in the league by The Ringer

The Ringer ranked the NBA's best young cores, organizing the best foundations in the league of players under 25.

The idea was to form concrete rankings based on FiveThirtyEight’s CARMELO player projections and the WAR (Wins Above Replacement) statistic, and The Ringer's list certainly has some star power at the top with Zion Williamson's Pelicans, Nikola Jokic's Nuggets and Luka Doncic's Mavericks all ranking in the top five and the Bulls made the top half of the list for their collection of young talent. 

The Ringer's Zach Kram has the Bulls ranked 14th in the young core rankings, with Lauri Markkanen contributing heavily to the Bulls favorable placement. 

Markkanen was rated as the best young player on the Bulls as a result of his WAR being the highest (10.8) among the Bulls young players. 

The team amassed an overall WAR of 33.1 (14th in the league) right behind the Miami Heat and ahead of the San Antonio Spurs. 

All of the rankings are based on the aforementioned advanced stats—WAR and CARMELO—but the Bulls specifically were both helped and hurt by the fact that they have a stable of young, potential-filled players rather than one central, clear-cut star. 

The Bulls core group of players fit together better than many young groups, which gave Kram and The Ringer some confidence in their long-term outlook.

...at the very least, the Bulls roster features a reasonably complementary set of young players around which to build.

-Zach Kram 

The fact that the advanced stats like Markkanen as the Bulls best player isn't extremely shocking, as his sophomore season was unequivocally a success. Over 52 games in the 2018-19 season, "The Finnisher" averaged 18.7 points and 9 rebounds per game while posting a career-best 106.8 offensive rating (per NBA.com). 

Of the five teams (weighted by production)  with an average age under 25-year-old last season, the Bulls had the 3rd most wins (22) behind the Kings and Nuggets.

Chicago will be looking to build a winning culture this upcoming season and having their talented youngsters now surrounded by competent veterans will certainly help make this a much easier feat for Jim Boylen and co. to accomplish.

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Bulls crack the top 20 of Forbes' most valuable sports franchises

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USA TODAY

Bulls crack the top 20 of Forbes' most valuable sports franchises

The Bulls' franchise is heading in the right direction on the court, and it's doing pretty great off it, too.

Forbes released its annual ranking of the top 50 most valuable sports franchises, and the Bulls are back in the top 20 with a valuation of $2.9 billion.

The Bulls are up from 23rd a year ago, when they were valued at $2.6 billion. They were 22nd in 2017 with a $2.5 billion valuation, and 18th in 2016 with a $2.3 billion valuation.

The Bulls were one of nine NBA franchises in the top 50. That number was one more than last year.

Here's a list of all nine NBA teams that made the cut:

1. New York Knicks ($4 billion)
2. Los Angeles Lakers ($3.7 billion)
3. Golden State Warriors ($3.5 billion)
4. Chicago Bulls ($2.9 billion)
5. Boston Celtics ($2.8 billion)
6. Brooklyn Nets ($2.35 billion)
7. Houston Rockets ($2.3 billion)
8. Dallas Mavericks ($2.25 billion)
9. Los Angeles Clippers ($2.2 billion)

As Forbes noted in the piece, "NBA teams have made the most dramatic moves this decade." Just seven years ago, the Lakers were valued at $900 million and were one of just two NBA teams (the Knicks were the other) in the top 50.

Among Chicago teams, the Bulls ranked second behind the Cubs ($3.1 billion) and tied with the Bears ($2.9 billion). Neither the Blackhawks nor the White Sox made the list.