Bulls

If the Bulls buy out Dwyane Wade, the Heat seem like they'd welcome him back

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USA TODAY

If the Bulls buy out Dwyane Wade, the Heat seem like they'd welcome him back

The Bulls are in complete rebuild mode, and that means they have little use for 35-year-old Dwyane Wade.

ESPN's Nick Friedell reported last week that it's a matter of when - not if - the Bulls will buy out Wade. The future Hall of Famer is due $24 million this upcoming season, but how much Wade receives in a potential buyout could hold things up in the short-term.

The question then becomes: where would Wade land after he passes through waivers and becomes a free agent?

A potential destination is joining good friend LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers. But Wade could also consider going back to the Miami Heat, where he spent the first 13 years of his NBA career.

And if he did, budding star Hassan Whiteside says the team would welcome back Wade with open arms.

"It'd be great," Whiteside told the Sun Sentinel. "It's a three-time NBA champion coming back, coming in and really helping a team out. It would be great."

Stay tuned, but it seems like a Wade-to-Miami reunion is a real possibility.

29 Days to Opening Night: The teams afraid of a Zach LaVine poster

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29 Days to Opening Night: The teams afraid of a Zach LaVine poster

 

We’d like to apologize to Jakarr Sampson if he clicked on this link. Though Zach LaVine was not exactly the model of efficiency in his first season with the Bulls, he certainly had a flair for the dramatic. And that included some ridiculous dunks, some of which came at the expense of opponents.

LaVine finished with 13 dunks in 24 games, a number that is sure to increase with a clean bill of health and a full offseason to prepare for the season ahead. The $78 million man will be showing up on SportsCenter’s Top 10 in no time.

Former Bulls No. 1 pick Elton Brand promoted to GM by Sixers

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USA TODAY

Former Bulls No. 1 pick Elton Brand promoted to GM by Sixers

The Philadelphia 76ers made a shocking move on Tuesday, promoting Elton Brand to be the franchise's newest general manager after a lengthy search. 

Bryan Colangelo resigned from the 76ers back on June 7, and there felt like there was little progress made on the GM-search front as September wore on. But Brand, who was the No. 1 pick by Chicago in the 1999 NBA Draft, is an internal hire that is both inspiring and scary when you consider his lack of experience in the front office. 

He spent 17 NBA seasons playing for the Bulls, Clippers, Hawks and 76ers. And after his playing career ended he dabbled in front office work, joining Philadelphia's staff as a consultant, and then later on as the GM of their G League affiliate, the Delaware 87ers. 

Brand's hire could have far-reaching implications. If the Sixers unique front-office structure works out, other franchises will take notice. Brand will be the GM, but head coach Brett Brown—who acted as the head decision-maker in personnel matters during the GM search—will still have a powerful voice, and is more likely to work with, rather than for Brand. And there is nothing wrong with that, but is interesting in the fact that usually we see GMs overrule their coaches on divisive personnel matters, whereas in Philly, big decisions will definitely have a more open-eneded approach when trying to come to a conclusion. 

And the biggest ripple-effect of all comes from the fact that Brand is a (quite recent) former player.

If his initial run as the Sixers GM goes well, it will surely inspire more NBA franchises to take a serious look at former players as front-office candidates. Notably, former players like Shareef Abdur Rahim and Allan Houston have looked for prominent roles in an NBA front office with varying degrees of success, working for the NBA and Knicks front-offices respectively. But Brand's quick ascencsion to GM in Philadelphia could serve as a blueprint for future teams, epspecially those that want to empower their head coach even more, without bestowing upon them the dreaded—at least from a fan perspctive—head coach/President of Basketball Operations role.

The Brand-Brown partnership will allow Brown to focus more on day-to-day team management and less on big-picture team building. And in turn, it will allow Brand to sharpen up his skills as a front-office exec with a team already made to compete, while providing Brown with another voice to rely on about coaching decisions. It is the exact type chance that the Sixers that have become known for taking over the years, the high-risk hiring that could usher in an era of stability or further expose franchise fragility.