Bulls

Jimmy Butler joins Love, Jordan, Pippen, Rose, others as All-NBA Bulls

Jimmy Butler joins Love, Jordan, Pippen, Rose, others as All-NBA Bulls

Jimmy Butler was named to the All-NBA Third Team on Thursday. Here's a look at the seven other players who have been named to an All-NBA team in the Bulls' 51-year franchise.

Bob Love (Second team: 1971, 1972)

The first member of the Bulls to appear on an All-NBA team, Love's two nods came in the same years he was named to two of his three All-Star games. In 1971, Love averaged 25.2 points and 8.5 rebounds in 43.0 minutes per game. It also coincided with the first winning season in Bulls franchise history (51-31), though they lost in seven games to the Los Angeles Lakers. The following year Love averaged a career-best 25.8 points for the 57-win Bulls.

Norm Van Lier (Second team: 1974)

Stormin' Normal took his game to a new level in 1974, averaging 14.3 points, 4.7 rebounds and 6.9 assists in nearly 36 minutes per game. He was named to his first of what would become three All-Star Games, and ended the year on the second team. The Bulls won 54 games, knocked off the Pistons in seven games before being swept by the Milwaukee Bucks in the conference finals.

Michael Jordan (Second team: 1985; First team: 1987-1993, 1996-1998)

It didn't take MJ long to find his name on an All-NBA team. In his rookie season Jordan was named to the second team, becoming the first rookie since Larry Bird (1980, first team) to accomplish the feat. Jordan took second team honors behind Magic Johnson and Isiah Thomas. Jordan missed all but 18 regular season games the following season with a broken foot.

Then the rest became history. Jordan was named All-NBA First Team the following 10 seasons in which he played the entire year. From 1987 to 1993 Jordan led the NBA in scoring all seven seasons, led the NBA in steals three times and minutes played twice. The Bulls, of course, won their first three titles and Jordan cemented himself as the game's best player. After skipping the 1993-1994 season to try his hand at baseball, Jordan returned late in the 1995 season for 17 games.

From 1996 to 1998 he was back at the top of the mountain, winning three titles and being named to the All-NBA First Team in each season. Had he not taken the two-year hiatus there's a real chance Jordan would have become the first (and still only) player to make the All-NBA First Team in 12 consecutive seasons (LeBron James, Karl Malone and Kobe Bryant are the only others to do so).

Scottie Pippen (Second team: 1992, 1997; Third team: 1993; First team: 1994-1996)

MJ's sidekick had already been named to one All-Star game before he found his name on an All-NBA squad. In 1992 he averaged 21.0 points, 7.7 rebounds and 7.0 assists. At the time he was just the seventh player in NBA history to reach those thresholds. He bumped down to the third team in 1993 as his numbers dipped some, but he still managed to average 18.6 points, 7.7 rebounds and 6.3 assists as the Bulls won their third of three straight titles.

When Jordan bolted for minor league baseball, Pippen took over and was named First Team All-NBA both seasons. He averaged 21.7 points, 8.4 rebounds and 5.4 assists for the Bulls in those years. When Jordan returned in 1996 Pippen was still red-hot and was again named All-NBA First Team, joining Jordan. It'd be the last time teammates shared First Team honors until 2002, when Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O'Neal did so.

In 1997, Pippen was named to the All-NBA Third Team. He averaged 20.2 points, 5.2 rebounds and 5.8 assists. He likely would have added to his total in 1998, but a toe injury forced him to appear in just 44 regular season games during the Bulls' final title run.

Derrick Rose (First team: 2011)

The Bulls went 13 years without a player on any All-NBA team, let alone the first team. But Derrick Rose's MVP campaign was certainly worthy of finding his name on the list. Rose appeared in 81 games, averaging 25.0 points, 4.1 rebounds and 7.7 assists and leading the Bulls to 61 wins and the top seed in the Eastern Conference. Though it seemed unthinkable at the time, 2011 would be the lone time Rose was named to an All-NBA team.

Joakim Noah (First team: 2014)

The face of the Bulls franchise had a truly remarkable 2014 season. He made his second All-Star team that year, carrying a Bulls team to 48 wins by averaging 12.6 points on 48 percent shooting, 11.3 rebounds and 5.4 assists per game. The assists were the most by a center in NBA history in a single season, and on top of that he also won Defensive Player of the Year. Knee and shoulder injuries ruined the following two seasons for Noah, and he appeared in just 46 games in his first season with the Knicks in 2016-17.

Paul Gasol (Second team: 2015)

The Bulls' free-agent splash had a resurgence in his first year in Chicago, averaging 18.5 points, 11.8 rebounds and 1.9 blocks in 35 minutes per game. He played in 78 games, the most for him since 2011, and was named an All-Star. A weak crop of centers certainly helped Gasol out in being named to the Second Team, but his numbers were impressive all the same after the Spaniard looked to be on the tail end of his illustrious career.

Jimmy Butler (Third team: 2017)

Were it not for Butler playing the deepest position in the NBA, he may have been named to the Second Team. That's how good his numbers were - especially playing for a Bulls team that had little else around him. Butler averaged 23.9 points, 6.2 rebounds and 5.5 assists, and single-handedly carried a banged up and (at times) dysfunctional Bulls team to the postseason.

NBA, NBPA announce two positive coronavirus tests from Orlando quarantine

NBA, NBPA announce two positive coronavirus tests from Orlando quarantine

It might be working.

The NBA's ambitious plan to restart its 2019-20 season in a so-called "bubble" on the Disney World campus showed a positive sign Monday. The league and National Basketball Players Association jointly announced that of 322 players tested for COVID-19 since teams began arriving in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., and entered quarantine with daily testing, only two positive cases have returned.

The statement said those two players never cleared quarantine and are either isolating at home after leaving the campus or in isolation housing.

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This was always the most critical step to getting the restart off the ground — moving teams from their in-market quarantine periods to inside the bubble. That only two positive cases have thus far emerged has to be viewed as an encouraging sign, especially given that players are tested daily once inside the bubble.

The NBA and NBPA also announced that 19 players have tested positive since July 1, when testing began in each team's respective home markets as players gathered for their initial quarantine period.

Those players have remained in their home markets, and will stay there until they are cleared by CDC guidelines and NBA rules for exiting home isolation and entering the bubble. James Harden is one high-profile name that has yet to join the Rockets on the NBA campus, although the team has not specified why, which is each team's right.

Monday's news isn't to suggest the 22-team restart plan is in the clear. Hurdles can arise at any time (two players have already been publicly identified for breaking quarantine), particularly given that workers on the Disney campus aren't subjected to the same daily testing regimens that all NBA personnel are. The NBA and NBPA have instituted rules to limit contact for these workers and league personnel.

The Bulls, like the other seven teams not invited to the restart, are watching what is transpiring at Disney World closely. If the restart succeeds, it increases the chances for a second bubble for the teams left behind, which would be for development purposes and likely take place in Chicago.

RELATED: Sources: NBA considering Chicago, Wintrust Arena for 'Delete 8' bubble

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NBA bubble: Kings' Richaun Holmes 'briefly and accidentally' breaks quarantine

NBA bubble: Kings' Richaun Holmes 'briefly and accidentally' breaks quarantine

On Monday, Richaun Holmes announced via Twitter that he accidentally broke quarantine in the NBA's Walt Disney World bubble, and is currently isolated in accordance with the league's Health and Safety Protocols.


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Holmes cited picking up a food delivery as the reason for his accidentally stepping outside of quarantine lines, and apologized to his teammates in the statement. His mother Lydecia had some fun with her son on social media in the wake of the news:

He'll now have to complete a designated ten-day quarantine period — which he said there are eight days remaining in — accompanied by testing and medical evaluation before returning to team activities. The NBA's Health and Safety Protocols say that such a quarantine period would take place "in a hotel room or other campus property," and can be extended to 14 days if so advised by a consulting infectious disease physician.

Because games haven't started yet, Holmes won't incur any financial penalty for games missed due to his breaking quarantine. But ESPN's Bobby Marks has the details on what those ramifications would have looked like for Holmes if he had made the mistake during the season restart.

ESPN also reported Monday that Rockets forward Bruno Caboclo accidentally broke quarantine, and has eight days remaining in his designated isolation period.

Holmes is a Lockport, Ill. native, and played one season at Moraine Valley Community College in Palos Hills before finishing his college career with three years at Bowling Green State. He was selected in the second round (No. 37 overall) of the 2015 NBA Draft by the Philadelphia 76ers.

With averages of 12.8 points and 8.3 rebounds (65.4% FG) in 28.8 minutes per game, Holmes is enjoying the best season of his career with the Kings, who enter the bubble 3.5 games back of the Memphis Grizzlies for the No. 8 seed in the West.

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