Bulls

LeBron lauds Delly's, Thompson's efforts in Cavs' Game 6 win

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LeBron lauds Delly's, Thompson's efforts in Cavs' Game 6 win

When the playoffs began Matthew Dellavedova and Tristan Thompson had distinct roles. The two reserves were expected to come off the bench and provide energy on a second unit that had ranked dead last in points per game, while maintaining the output provided by the team’s star power in LeBron James, Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving.

Ten games later, both found themselves sitting at the postgame podium on either side of the game’s best player after providing unlikely primary performances in Cleveland’s Game 6, series clinching victory over the Bulls.

“They want to be good. They want to be great,” James said after the game. “And every single day they prepare the right way, and they just go out and they play with instincts. They’ve played basketball their whole lives, and for them to go out there and put it out on the floor, good things happen for guys who are true to the game.”

In two rounds of the playoffs the Cavaliers have been met with unforeseen injury circumstances to Love and Irving, twice trailed in their series against Chicago and had to deal with the realistic question of whether or not a team built on that star power could sustain their high expectations with a group of role players touting little to no postseason experience.

[MORE: Lifeless Bulls fall to Cavaliers in series-clincher]

Thursday night they got their answer.

It was a turbulent series for Dellavedova, who heard boos rain down from the United Center after getting tangled up with Taj Gibson in their Game 5 victory. But when Irving aggravated a left knee injury and exited the game for good early in the second quarter, the Cavaliers didn’t miss a beat on either side of the ball when Dellavedova took over.

The second year guard hounded Derrick Rose (14 points on 16 FGA) defensively and found his outside shooting touch in the second half, scoring 16 points on 6-for-10 shooting after halftime, with each basket extinguishing any chance of a Bulls comeback any time the hosts showed any signs of life.

Dellavedova went 15-for-27 in the series, handily outplaying his bench counterpart Aaron Brooks throughout and providing necessary defense on Rose while the Cavs attempted to hide Irving’s limited mobility on the defensive end.

“He’s an incredible competitor,” Irving said. “I’m so happy for him.”

Head coach David Blatt’s attempt to use James at power forward backfired in Game 1, prompting him to insert Thompson at the power forward spot to allow James to play on the perimeter. And though it left the Cavs paper-thin on the second unit, Thompson’s play in the series was invaluable. On Thursday night he scored 10 points in the opening stanza, helping Cleveland withstand a 31-point quarter from the Bulls. He continued his assault on the glass, grabbing 12 rebounds after halftime as the Cavs clamped down a Bulls team that scored 42 points after the opening quarter.

He increased his scoring total all six games of the series, and averaged a double-double after entering the starting lineup in Game 2 (10.4 points, 11.8 rebounds).

“Just being part of the playoffs and having the opportunity to play with (James) over here, it definitely is special,” Thompson said. “What a ride. I’m glad I could be a part of it and help this team win.”

[SHOP: Gear up, Bulls fans!]

It doesn't appear Irving will be playing at full-strength anytime soon, while Thompson has cemented himself in a starting role. And while James' production will always be a direct correlation of how the Cavaliers are playing - he added nine rebounds and 11 assists - Cleveland's role players suddenly have taken on a far greater role than they expected when the playoffs began.

Contributions from J.R. Smith and Iman Shumpert hold value to the Cavs, but on Thursday night it was Thompson and Dellavedova who delivered the knockout blow to a championship-aspiring Bulls team and moved the Cavaliers one step closer to their ultimate goal.

"This guy here," James said pointing to Thompson, "he’s not the most athletic guy right here, he’s not the tallest power forward in our league, he’s not the strongest power forward in our league. But not too many guys can keep him guys off the glass.

"This guy here," James continued, turning to Dellavedova, "is not the most athletic, fastest, doesn’t shoot it as great as all the other point guards in our league. But I’ll put him out there against anybody.

"When your mind is true, I think the game gives back to you."

Loyola's March Madness hero Donte Ingram will play with Bulls' Summer League team

Loyola's March Madness hero Donte Ingram will play with Bulls' Summer League team

Donte Ingram's 2018 keeps getting better and better.

The March Madness hero, who buried a game-winning 3-pointer in the first round of Loyola's win over Miami, will play on the Bulls' Summer League team.

Ingram, a Simeon Academy graduate, had himself an incredible senior season with the Ramblers, who advanced all the way to the Final Four as a No. 11 seed.

In five NCAA Tournament games Ingram averaged 7.0 points, 5.8 rebounds and 1.6 assists for the Ramblers. He also had 18 points in the MVC Conference Championship Game to secure the Ramblers' March Madness berth.

He'll join first-round draft picks Wendell Carter Jr. and Chandler Hutchison on the Las Vegas Summer League team, which will begin play early next month.

Here's why the Bulls didn't take Michael Porter Jr. last night

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USA TODAY

Here's why the Bulls didn't take Michael Porter Jr. last night

There was angst and anger among the Bulls fan base following the team's selection of Wendell Carter in Thursday's NBA Draft. Though the team had been linked to Missouri forward Michael Porter Jr. - and he was far and away the biggest fan favorite - the Bulls passed on the former No. 1 prospect, opting to play it safe and find a complement to Lauri Markkanen on the frontline.

Porter fell farther than just past the Bulls at No. 7. Cleveland opted for Collin Sexton. The Knicks and Sixers went with wings similar to Porter in Kevin Knox and Mikal Bridges.

Porter didn't hear his name called until the very last selection of the Lottery, with the Nuggets grabbing the 6-foot-10 scorer. It's a dice roll for Denver, but one it can afford after it won 47 games and was Game No. 82 away from making the postseason. They're a team on the rise that doesn't need an immediate contribution from a rookie. And that's good, because Porter might not be contributing at all in his rookie season.

Gar Forman and John Paxson were asked about whether Porter was in consideration at No. 7, and if his medicals played any part in the decision to pass.

And while Forman wouldn't address medical situations, he did say the Bulls were in contact with Porter throughout the draft process.

"We spent time with Mike, he’s a great young man," Paxson said. "We’re not gonna talk about medical things. We go through a diligent process every single year.

"This year we probably had more debate and dialogue as a staff. Varying degrees of opinion were really strong. We wish him the best out in Denver."

Paxson didn't say that "debate and dialogue" necessarily included Porter, but multiple reports said the Bulls weren't interested in Porter when it came down to choosing at No. 7.

And it makes sense. The Bulls are in a position where they're beginning to move along in their rebuild. They needed a contributor, and someone who could play right away. Porter wasn't that player, and he wasn't going to be a great fit with Markkanen and Zach LaVIne anyway.

It'll always be fun to think about what could have been, but the injury risk was simply too high for the Bulls to consider using an important 7th pick on a guy who might not play for 16 months.