Bulls

NBA lockout looming after this season?

NBA lockout looming after this season?

Sunday, Sept. 26, 2010
10:21 PM

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com
A historic summer for the NBA has passed and for the Bulls, while they didn't acquire quite the star power many expected andor hoped for, optimism runs high, both within the organization and throughout the team's fan base. With the offseason coming to an end, the time to fully delve into the upcoming NBA season is here. Instead of a traditional season preview, issues both throughout the league and in Chicago will be probed daily here on CSNChicago.com up until the squad officially convenes for training camp toward the end of September.

18. Will there be a lockout after this season?

It's still far too early to gauge whether a new collective bargaining agreement (CBA) will be reached prior to the 2011-12 NBA campaign and without more prior knowledge about labor negotiations, this writer isn't the one to get too deep into the current state of affairs, let alone the end result, such as a work stoppage. Still, it's worth it to at least probe the surface of the issues at hand.

In the wake of the spending by NBA franchises this offseason, an easy argument can be made that teams must be healthy financially to be able to line the pockets of its players, whether the various contracts deserving or dubious. The league, however, claims that franchises have suffered drastic losses--a major point of contention--and are hamstrung by constraints resulting from the last CBA.

"According to their theory, it's because of the system that's in place that forces them to spend the money, so it's not that they want to spend the money," a vice president on the NBPA's executive committee told CSNChicago.com. "It's the only option they have to be competitive, according to them."

"The thing is, it's still just posturing," the player, who wished to remain anonymous, continued. "We're still working off the last deal. From my standpoint, the last CBA has obviously been working for the last five, six years, so it's been doing what its supposed to do...the owners are trying to make it make a little more sense for them from their perspective. In their words, they're trying to make it make a little more sense for them from a business side."

"It's hard to know what goes into it from a player's perspective because there's really no rhyme or reason at times to why one player gets a deal versus another player. There's been numerous players that you can look at that should have got better deals than what they did, but for whatever reason they ended up having to go elsewhere," he went on to say, using Lakers point guard and NBPA executive committee president Derek Fisher--who he claims had to fight for a new extension despite always wanting to remain in Los Angeles--for an example. "That's the kind of stuff that needs to be stressed, as well. Allowing players to more easily move from team to team, allowing players to be secure, distributing the money to the correct players who are actually performing in those free-agent years."

After a three-hour meeting of the two sides last Wednesday--described as "cordial and constructive" in a joint statement issued afterwards by the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA)--all indications point to no progress in sight until after February's All-Star weekend (when the next meeting will occur), at the earliest. That leaves approximately four months--the current CBA expires on June, 30, 2011--to reach a resolution.

"It was more of a discussion on what can be done to make the game grow and what's our perspective and what's their perspective," the player described the negotiations to CSNChicago.com. "It's still no numbers, no nothing...it's basically setting the stage to bring forth changes and it was positive in the sense that they got a better understanding of where we're coming from and we got a better understanding of what they want. Somehow we can make it all work out and it makes sense where we don't shut down the business."

The league reportedly is in favor of imposing a hard cap, similar to the NFL, under which organizations wouldn't be able exceed the NBA-wide salary cap. That would mean the end of deep-pocketed owners being able to exceed the salary cap and pay a luxury tax, as well as player exceptions that enable veterans to re-sign with their teams, regardless of the cap.

While the NBPA objects to such an idea, the recent meeting in New York was more of a forum for proposals and was described as a "positive" interaction by the aforementioned source, a veteran who signed an offseason extension to remain with his current team.

"Just suggestions about making it easier for players to move from team to team, to loosen up restricted free agency so that when a guy who's performing well for his team, for example, doesn't have to be confined to that contract," the player, who indicated that base-year compensation is another told CSNChicago.com. If a player is still on his rookie wage scale, maybe he can get out of it a little sooner so he can go out and be a major player for another team if his team doesn't want to pay him."

"Things like that are ways to improve the game and allow it to even out the competitive balance and that's what one of the issues is," he added. "Every team wants the opportunity to be competitive every year. That goes into making decisions about who to draft and paying the right players. that goes back to the owners policing themselves."

The league and its owners, on the other hand, are more concerned with revenues, over half of which reportedly go to the players. The current economic climate plays its part in their concerns, but overall, they seemingly desire to have a new CBA go in the other direction, with lower player salaries one of the end results.

Although no marked progress was made at last week's meeting, it appears that the league and players are both committed to avoiding a lockout. For those who don't remember the last NBA work stoppage--which ended up abbreviating the 1998-99 season--the threat of fans resenting the pro game as a whole (players, owners, teams and the league alike) will hopefully spur the two sides to come to agreement before going down that less-than-scenic path.

"I don't think there's much frustration on either side because we both understand it's a process and we both understand that if we're both willing to take in each other's ideas and consider each other's ideas to grow the game for fans...people will continued to come out and support it. We both agree that the game is in a great place," the player optimistically told CSNChicago.com. "I think we're definitely on the right track...I don't know if it's going to be anything in place by All-Star weekend. I know that we're working to be further along in the process by All-Star, but how far along we come by that point remains to be seen."

"I think, for the most part, again, as players and the perspective that we're taking, it's a partnership and we're trying to be open to...hearing their suggestions," the NBPA vice president, who ironically took part in the league's Leadership and Development program--designed to help players move into coaching or management positions after their playing days are over; one of the sessions included in the July session in Las Vegas was a CBA tutorial--continued. "We're trying to be open to trying to grow the game, to make it better...I think the owners will hopefully be willing to continue to see that and again, it's so early in the bargaining stage."

Time is on their side--both sides--but it's not too early to consider a potentially negative outcome, no matter how much none of us wants to right now.

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.coms Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

Making of a Chicago legend: A look back at Jabari Parker's decorated Simeon career

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AP

Making of a Chicago legend: A look back at Jabari Parker's decorated Simeon career

From the moment Jabari Parker started his local basketball career, he's been a special talent who has produced at every level. Parker's signing with the Chicago Bulls this offseason brings back a lot of memories of his decorated four-year high school career at Simeon.

For Bulls fans who didn't follow Parker before Duke or the NBA, here's some of the notable moments from four years in the Public League.

As a freshman with the Wolverines, Parker was seen as one of three big incoming freshman in the area for the Class of 2013, along with forward Alex Foster and center Tommy Hamilton. Although all three players had the size and skill level to be varsity contributors, it was Parker who was special from his debut game.

Coming off the bench for a top-5 Simeon team against a top-10 Thornton team at Chicago State, Parker had 16 points on 6-for-9 shooting with two 3-pointers as the Wolverines went on to win in his first game in high school. Eventually becoming the first Wolverine freshman to start on varsity, Parker piled up high-major scholarship offers and national acclaim, as he was the team's second-leading scorer behind Brandon Spearman.

But Parker was hurt on the eve of the IHSA Class 4A state championship weekend and was on the bench injured as Simeon went on to surprisingly win the state title after some late-season slip-ups. Parker contributed heavily to Simeon winning the state title during his first season, however, as he was leading scorer in six games during that season.

During his sophomore season, Parker blossomed from a prospect into a full-blown star as Simeon once again captured a state title. By this point in his career, Parker was a consensus top-5 national high school prospect in his class as he regularly led a loaded Simeon team in scoring. Parker eventually averaged 15.3 points and 5.9 rebounds per game as he won ESPN High School 2011 Sophomore of the Year national honors, while also Simeon won a title at the prestigious Pontiac Holiday Tournament.

The summer of 2011 saw Parker become a contender for No. 1 in his class -- and regardless of class at the high school level -- as he dominated the summer circuit against his peers and older players.

Making the 2011 USA Basketball U16 team, Parker won MVP honors at the FIBA Americas U16 Tournament as the USA team captured a gold medal. Parker also had big performances at the Kevin Durant and LeBron James Skill Academies before winning the MVP at the Nike Global Challenge in August against mostly older players.

Before entering his junior season at Simeon, some national scouts believed Parker was the best prospect in either the junior or senior national classes. With Parker garnering so many accomplishments as an underclassman, he had a huge reputation already as Simeon was an established national powerhouse.

Parker helped the Wolverines capture a third straight state title, a city title and another title at the Pontiac Holiday Tournament, as they went 33-1. Simeon didn't lose to an Illinois opponent Parker's junior year (they only lost to nationally ranked Findlay Prep) with Parker setting a school record of 40 points in only 21 minutes against Perspectives on Dec. 19. For his junior season, Parker put up 19.5 points, 8.9 rebounds per game as he became the first non-senior to win Mr. Basketball in Illinois honors.

Gatorade also declared Parker the national boys basketball Player of the Year for that high school season as he became only the fourth non-senior to win that award. Sports Illustrated put Parker on its cover and proclaimed him as the best high school basketball player since LeBron James.

Facing an enormous amount of pressure during his senior year, Simeon played a national schedule and went 30-3, winning a fourth consecutive IHSA state title with Parker as he put up 18.4 points, 10.4 rebounds and 2.7 assists per game.

Becoming the only player besides Sergio McClain to start on four straight IHSA state title teams, Parker secured back-to-back Mr. Basketball in Illinois honors while also making the McDonald's All-American Game, Jordan Brand Classic and the Nike Hoop Summit. Parker played all over the country during his senior season, with nationally-televised games and packed crowds filled with fans.

Reclassifications and the emergence of other contenders, coupled with Parker's foot injury before his senior season, dropped Parker below the No. 1 ranking to end his high school career. But he still finished as a consensus top-5 prospect in the class who eventually rose to the No. 2 pick in the NBA Draft in 2014.

Now that Parker has signed with the Bulls, he has a chance to resurrect his career in Chicago, the place where he had his most basketball success.

Would Wendell Carter Jr. be picked higher if the NBA Draft was today?

Would Wendell Carter Jr. be picked higher if the NBA Draft was today?

According to Bleacher Report, Wendell Carter Jr. would be taken fourth overall by the Memphis Grizzlies if the NBA were to redraft this year’s class based off of Summer League performances.

It may sound like a crazy concept (and it is), but Carter Jr. averaged the second most points, 14.6, through five July games in Las Vegas. He also averaged 9.4 rebounds and shot 55 percent from the field while averaging 28.8 minutes in his glamorous first-stint with Chicago. Those numbers are even more striking if you consider Carter Jr.’s 42.9 percent shooting from behind the three-point line.

Carter Jr., the real seventh overall pick of this year’s NBA Draft, looked like the all-around player the Bulls were hoping to get this offseason. He made his blocking abilities as a center known from the moment he stepped on the court in Summer League.

In their re-draft, Bleacher Report had Chicago using the No. 7 pick on the New York Knicks’ Mitchell Robinson, who was actually taken 36th overall in last month’s Draft.

Robinson, a center, averaged 13 points and 24.8 minutes per game over five Summer League contests. He was the best rebounder on his team with an average of 10.2 in the five games that the Knicks played.

The 20-year-old took the second most shots on the Knicks and had the highest field goal percentage at 67 percent, but Robinson did not have any three-point attempts.  What made his recent production seem even more surprising was the fact that the 7'1'' big man did not play a single minute of college basketball.

But would Robinson fit in the Bulls’ system?

Chicago has taken on an offense-first mentality, so Robinson would not be as great of a fit in the Bulls lineup as Carter Jr., but he would still be an impact player. He can be compared to the Bulls’ current center Robin Lopez, who averaged a similar amount of points per game (11.8 points in 26.4 minutes) last season as Robinson’s Summer League average (13 points in 24.8 minutes). And like Lopez, Robinson will likely be most effective around the basket and in the pick-and-roll.

Robinson would also have to learn the defensive concepts that a veteran like Lopez has mastered over his 10-year career.

Next season, the Bulls will have an exciting scoring trio of Jabari Parker, Lauri Markkanen and Carter Jr. in the frontcourt. And the fact that Carter Jr. is getting so much love in the national spotlight is yet another reason for Bulls fans to be excited about this upcoming season.