Bulls

Pau Gasol not forcing the offense against Bucks' double teams

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Pau Gasol not forcing the offense against Bucks' double teams

The ball softly left the sure hands of Pau Gasol, falling off the rim before the Spaniard tipped once and tipped again as the ball finally reached its destination in Game 2 against the Bucks, followed by Gasol yelling in relief and satisfaction.

But like everything else with Gasol in this series, there was a drawback—his final tip was waved off because of a loose ball foul he wasn’t involved in, negating his basket and the frustrating energy he used to score.

Gasol has been public enemy No. 1 on Jason Kidd’s defensive scheme, running double-teams so fast and furious at Gasol that he probably sees them in his sleep.

But despite shooting just 31 percent through the first two games this series, he hasn’t lashed out in frustration or tried to force his own offense. Whether it’s John Henson or Zaza Pachulia or the long-armed Giannis Antetokounmpo running at him, facing single-coverage hasn’t happened at all this series.

“The double teams, if they continue, so be it,” Gasol said. “I'm not worried about making the right play and being unselfish. If they're doubling me, there's a guy who's gonna be wide open with a better shot than I would. I'm prepared if that stops.”

They’ve made the decision that Gasol will not be the one to beat them, and even though they’ve given Derrick Rose more attention when he has the ball, they haven’t lightened up on Gasol, perhaps the greatest sign of respect. He’s used to getting doubled-up on, but it’s usually after getting off with a few easy scores and a defense adjusting to stop him.

“I just attract two defenders, which I like to do anyways,” Gasol said. “For the most part that takes sometimes you get going and score a few buckets then they make adjustments but it's been continuous and automatic since the start of the series. If that continues, I'll continue to make the right play. Even though I haven't been in a very good rhythm, somebody else will get a good shot and that's good offense.”

[PLAYOFFS: Mirotic ruled out for Game 3, could miss Game 4 with injury]

While the Bulls are up 2-0 and poised to take a real stronghold on the series if they can weather the emotions and energy of the Bucks tomorrow night, they haven’t been a fluid offensive group, heavily dependent on Rose and Jimmy Butler.

Rose, a player who’s never been afraid to attack double teams and force up a few shots at times, admires Gasol’s patience.

““It says a lot about his character as far as he’ll do anything to win,” Rose said. “He knows that they’re coming right away, he’s not complaining about shots, he’s not worrying about playing so many minutes. He just wants to win the game, so it rubs off on everyone. You’ve got a player like that, that’s giving himself up the way he does it shows a lot.’’

The Bulls often speak about what “the game gives you”—which sure sounds like a “Thibs-ism” or Larry Brown and Gregg Popovich saying to “play the right way”. Either way, Gasol makes it a habit of having his unselfishness lead by example.

[NBC SHOP: Gear up, Bulls fans!]

“It’s great having him,” Rose said. “With the way that they’re double-teaming him, they’re not even allowing him to get a good shot off. They’re coming right away, so it’s easy basketball. Two swings to an open shot, that’s the easies shot that you can get when they’re double-teaming like that.’’

They shot just 38 percent in Game 2, and one can expect the screws will be tightened even more with Nikola Mirotic out. Gasol may have to be more aggressive—and Tom Thibodeau will probably have to put Gasol in situations where he’s on the move and can score before the double teams come.

“If I can, yeah. If I can, if I get opportunities I'll be more aggressive,” Gasol said. “I'm not discontent with my level of aggressiveness, I just try to make the right play. See if I can make a couple more shots and see if I can be good.”

Bulls questions: Evaluating last offseason's additions and their long-term fit

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USA Today

Bulls questions: Evaluating last offseason's additions and their long-term fit

Two times per week, we'll be breaking down a pertinent Bulls question for you all to chew in during the NBA's hiatus.

Past installments: What is Zach LaVine's ceiling? | Should Bulls lock in Kris Dunn long-term after career-reviving year?

The buzz around the 2019-20 Bulls season crescendoed last offseason. With a promising core of Zach LaVine, Lauri Markkanen and Wendell Carter Jr. already in place, the addition of the electric Coby White through the draft and savvy, supplementary vets through free agency appeared to add up to a winning formula for the third year of the rebuild. 

That calculation was, of course, made on paper. In practice… Well, you saw the results. 

But how did each of the Bulls’ additions for the 2019-20 seasons perform? How should they fit into the team’s long-term plans? Let’s evaluate (all contract figures via Spotrac):

Thad Young — signed to a three-year, $44 million contract last summer (third year partially guaranteed at $6 million)

Young’s season can pretty tidily be divided into three subsections (all per game averages):

  • First 24 games: 21.2 minutes, 8.8 points, 4.2 rebounds, 0.9 steals; 40.9/34.2/56.7 shooting splits (8.5 attempts)

  • Next 21 games: 23.7 minutes, 9.3 points, 5.0 rebounds, 1.4 steals; 43.3/34.8/64.7 shooting splits (8.9 attempts)

  • Next 19 games: 30.8 minutes (15 starts), 13.3 points, 5.8 rebounds, 2.2 steals; 49.8/37.7/56 (11.1 attempts); 17 double-digit scoring performances

Those segments aren’t arbitrary. The first 24 represented approximately the first third of Young’s eventual 64-game season. At that tentpole, he was averaging the second-lowest minutes total of his 13-year career (to only his rookie campaign), and looked largely uncomfortable navigating the Bulls’ up-tempo, 3-pointer heavy offensive system.

Segment two begins on Dec. 11, when Young logged a then season high 33 minutes in a 35-point home victory over the lowly Hawks, notching 15 points, nine rebounds and six assists. The next day, a report surfaced from the Chicago Sun-Times that Young was unhappy with his playing time allotment — a report that Young addressed at length to the media soon afterwards. From there, trade rumors and rumblings of broken promises festered around Young. Through it all, he remained publicly professional and, by all accounts, a keen advisor to many of the Bulls’ young players behind the scenes. Meanwhile, his play subtly began to improve, especially on the defensive end, with a modest uptick in minutes.

The start of segment three is marked by Lauri Markkanen being sidelined for a little over a month with an early stress reaction in his pelvis. Young started 15 games in his stead and played his best ball of the season, even as the Bulls, at large, floundered. The correlation between increased opportunity and production is one Young never shied away from drawing.

 

The question for him moving forward is if his interests and the Bulls’ are at odds. In its totality, this wasn’t the season Young or fans expected from him, but he proved he has enough left in the tank to be a contributor to winning basketball. If the Bulls aren’t ready to do that, the question of a long-term fit here is a legitimate one. Juggling Young and Markkanen’s minutes was already a point of friction this season, and if anything, Markkanen should be doing more next year. Plus, what if the Bulls invest their impending top-10 draft choice on a forward? Though they couldn’t find any takers for Young at the deadline, finding an outlet for the final two years of his deal (and finding him a winning situation) could be on the team’s radar.

Tomas Satoransky — signed to a three-year, $30 million contract last summer (third year partially guaranteed at $5 million)

The specter of Satoransky was always an intriguing one. A low-maintenance, pass-first, heady floor general to start alongside Zach LaVine while White developed in the wings. Facilitate, hit open jumpers and defend at a clip reasonable for his 6’7” frame, and Satoransky would be the quintessential complementary piece.

And while he showed flashes — a 27-point, nine-assist outing in Atlanta (oh man, is there a trend here?) and multiple stat sheet-stuffings against the Wizards — his production largely didn’t pass the sniff test. Among the most alarming figures from Satoransky’s first season in Chicago: From Dec. 1 on, Satoransky shot 26.8 percent from 3-point range (3.1 attempts per); on the season, he converted 32.9 percent of his catch-and-shoot 3-point looks — a steep dive from his 42.8 percent career mark entering the season (a huge part of what made him such an intriguing option in the first place). Moreover, his general assertiveness on the offensive end often seemed to wax and wane at times.

A positive: If this rebuild has proved anything, it’s that availability is an ability, and Satoransky was certainly that. He and White were the only two Bulls to appear in all of the team’s first 65 games before play was indefinitely suspended. In the final game before that suspension, Satoransky gracefully ceded the starting spot — a title he coveted upon signing with the Bulls — to White, admitting he hadn’t performed up to his personal expectations this season. He’s another guy that draws rave reviews from teammates and coaches at every turn.

As of the Bulls’ current roster construction, Satoransky continuing to back up White is probably the team’s best course moving forward, though that’s subject to change depending on how the Bulls deploy that aforementioned top-10 pick. Him running the team’s second unit can still be a winning formula, and $10 million next season with a non-guaranteed third year isn’t the end of the world.

Luke Kornet — signed to a two-year, $4.5 million contract last summer (fully guaranteed)

To say Kornet didn’t meet expectations doesn’t feel fair. He was always a low-risk flyer, and the emergence of Daniel Gafford softened the blow of his tumultuous campaign.

What’s more, he overcame a debilitating nasal ailment that marred his first three months in Chicago to flash spurts of productivity in January and February. After Carter badly sprained his right ankle on Jan. 6, Kornet re-entered the rotation for 19 games and averaged 8.9 points, 3.2 rebounds and nearly a block per game while shooting 47.4 percent from the field and making 14 starts. A severe right ankle sprain sustained in practice ended his season in late February.

The 3-point shooting never came around — he converted a career-low 28.7 percent of his long-range attempts, and only 30.4 percent in that aforementioned 19-game stretch. The Bulls’ blitzing defensive system that draws bigs up and away from the basket is not suited to his strengths. He’s not on the short-list of the Bulls’ biggest problems, but isn’t a part of the long-term solution either.

Non-Coby rookies

Bonus section for the non-Coby White rookies, because they warrant mention (and White’s going to get his own column soon enough):

  • Daniel Gafford: A gem if the Bulls have ever found one. Scooped up with the No. 38 pick of the 2019 draft, Gafford led all rookies in total blocks (56) and players with more than 20 games played in blocks per 36 minutes (3.3) while clawing his way into the Bulls’ rotation after starting the season off the map. His energy, high-flying capacity and rim-protecting potential make him an incredibly viable — if not ideal — cost-controlled backup center option. First on the to-do list for year two is working on limiting his fouls, but he exceeded expectations this season (something not many Bulls can say) and should figure into the team’s plans for at least the immediate future. 

  • Adam Mokoka: Signed to a two-way deal for this season, and appeared in 11 games as the Bulls balanced his NBA days down the stretch. It would have been nice to see more of him. Two times Mokoka caught eyes over the course of this season — once with a record-setting 15-point outburst against the Pelicans in February, then with lockdown defense on Luka Doncic to key one of the Bulls’ few quality wins of the season. If the team decides to let Kris Dunn walk this offseason, Mokoka (along with Shaq Harrison) is a young, potentially inexpensive option already on the roster to try and replace some percentage of Dunn’s production and defensive energy. And not for nothing: Mokoka has a solid stroke and shot 40 percent from 3-point range (15 total attempts) in those 11 games. A heftier 31-game sample size in the G League saw him convert 32.7 percent of his long-range looks on 5.4 attempts per game, but there’s cause to believe that can be built upon.

  • Max Strus: Another two-way guy, and a local product. But he tore his ACL in December after appearing in just two NBA games. It’s hard to discern what Strus’ future with the Bulls might be, but he has been a consistent presence around the United and Advocate Centers throughout his rehab process.

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United Center to act as storage facility for Greater Chicago Food Depository

United Center to act as storage facility for Greater Chicago Food Depository

Earlier in March, the United Center announced it would transform itself into a logistics hub to aid in response and relief measures during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Tuesday morning, it announced an actionable development in that effort. Moving forward, the UC will act as a satellite storage facility for the Greater Chicago Food Depository.

"By alleviating space in the food bank’s warehouse, the Food Depository can bring additional volunteers into their facility to build more family food boxes in an environment that adheres to social distancing protocols," a statement reads. "These boxes will continue to be distributed to those in need by the Food Depository’s partner network throughout Chicago and Cook County."

On Sunday, March 29, the United Center also hosted a Personal Protective Equipment drive to crowdsource and distribute healthcare supplies to local providers. 

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Bulls and Blackhawks easily on your device.