Bulls

Rising Bulls Head West with High Hopes

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Rising Bulls Head West with High Hopes

Sunday, Jan. 17, 2010
7:47 p.m.

by Mark Schanowski
CSNChicago.com

So, what are your expectations for the upcoming seven game road trip? How many games do you think the Bulls will win?

I'm going with three, which means a slightly below .500, (3-4) trip. The key is getting off to a fast start. The Bulls have two winnable games right off the bat against the Warriors and Clippers. They beat Golden State in overtime at the U.C. last month, and the Warriors are the worst defensive team in the league. On top of that, they've been decimated by injuries all season long, playing one game last month with only six healthy players. Unfortunately, some of those injured players are coming back, starting with underrated center Andris Biedrins, who missed last month's game in Chicago, and has really killed the Bulls in the past. Biedrins is a good match-up for Joakim Noah. He can run the floor and does a good job crashing the offensive glass for easy putbacks. And, with Golden State's line-up filled with three-point gunners, there are usually plenty of rebounds to be grabbed. The Warriors haven't exactly been Team Harmony this season. Head coach Don Nelson just wants to get enough wins to pass Lenny Wilkens on the all-time list, and then he'll disappear into retirement in Hawaii. He's feuded openly with his best player, Monta Ellis, and benched former Fenwick high school star Corey Maggette earlier in the season. Maggette is getting big minutes again, and he's still one of the better points per minute scorers in the league, with an innate ability to get to the free throw line. Reportedly, he's available in trade as are most of the Golden State players, but Maggette's skills probably don't fit the type of player the Bulls would like to add, plus he has several more years remaining on a contract that will pay him almost 10 million dollars a season.

Top draft pick Stephen Curry is starting for Golden State after getting limited minutes early in the season, and he's starting to show how valuable he can be as a prolific three-point shooter, He still needs to work on his strength for the NBA game, but there's little doubt he should have a long and successful career. The Warriors are always dangerous because of their ability to score, but the Bulls should be able to take advantage of their non-existent defense to win a high-scoring game.

Next up is the Clippers, who found out last week they won't have last summer's number one overall draft pick, Blake Griffin, for a single regular season minute because of a fractured left kneecap. The Clips were trying to hang on in the Western Conference playoff race until Griffin returned, and they do have pretty good talent with players like Baron Davis, Eric Gordon, Chris Kaman and Al Thornton. But again, this is a game the Bulls should be able to win if they take advantage of the Clippers' tendency to fall apart late in close games.

The schedule gets tougher after that with games in Phoenix, Houston, San Antonio, Oklahoma City and New Orleans, but none of those teams should be considered unbeatable. My best guess is the Bulls will win in Phoenix or New Orleans. The Suns are really struggling right now, losing four of their last five games, with Steve Nash starting to come back to earth a bit after playing near his previous M.V.P. level early in the season. Phoenix lost by 26 at Charlotte last week, and their defense has pretty much disappeared with most opponents scoring well over 100 points in recent games. Bulls' fans will get a close-up look at Amare Stoudemire, who was linked to the team in trade speculation last year, and might be one of the Bulls' targets in free agency next summer. Stoudemire looks to be fully recovered from his off-season eye surgery, averaging 21 points and 9 rebounds a game. He's probably fourth or fifth on the Bulls' wish list behind LeBron, D-Wade, Chris Bosh and possibly, Joe Johnson.

New Orleans is another fringe playoff team in the West. They're playing better after Byron Scott was fired as head coach, and replaced by General Manager Jeff Bower and top assistant Tim Floyd. But more importantly, Chris Paul is healthy again after suffering a bad ankle sprain early in the year. Paul is one of the top 10 players in the league, and the Hornets will need to do everything in their power to keep a competitive team around him, or he might look for greener pastures when his contract expires. There have been rumors New Orleans might be interested in trading David West to Cleveland for Zydrunas Ilgauskas' expiring contract to reduce their payroll. I'm guessing that's not a deal Paul would appreciate after seeing his friend Tyson Chandler get traded in the off-season.

Bottom line, the Bulls are still a team capable of beating the best teams in the league, or losing to the worst. Even after that impressive win at Boston last week, their road record is just 4-13 and that's not good enough for a team with hopes of making the playoffs. We should learn a lot about where the Bulls are headed when the seven-game trip is over. Winning three or four games will keep the Vinny Del Negro speculation from heating up, and give the Bulls a decent chance of getting to the All-Star break close to the .500 mark. And, a good showing by Derrick Rose might earn him a spot on the Eastern Conference All-Star team, ending the Bulls' shutout streak that goes back to the days of Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen in 1998. The Bulls have looked like a much improved offensive team in winning seven of their last 10 games, with John Salmons finally finding the range from the three-point line and Rose and Luol Deng capable of carrying the scoring load on a given night.

Let's hope that improvement continues on the trip. What do you think? Please post your comments and expectations for the trip in the section below. Enjoy the hoops!

NBA 'promises' to potential draft picks not unusual

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USA TODAY

NBA 'promises' to potential draft picks not unusual

Bulls Twitter went on high alert after last week's national report that the front office had made a "promise" to draft Boise State small forward Chandler Hutchison if he was still on the board at No. 22 in the first round. Weren't the Bulls supposed to be interested in SF prospects like Michael Porter Jr., Mikal Bridges and Miles Bridges with their own first round selection? Did a "promise" to Hutchison mean the Bulls would go with Wendell Carter, Trae Young or Collin Sexton at No. 7?

The simple answer is the Bulls haven't made any final decisions on either pick. They still plan to bring the top prospects in for workouts and interviews before June 21 and will continue to take a close look at players likely to be available in the 18-30 range.

And, like any professional sports franchise, the Bulls aren't about to confirm or deny they've made a commitment to Hutchison or any other player. Drafts are fluid, and invariably players will rise and fall throughout the workout/interview process as teams try to get their boards lined up for the big night.

The main reason a team will make a "promise" to a player is to eliminate his incentive to work out for other franchises. In the case of Hutchison, he's obviously received assurances from a team or teams that he will be drafted in the first round. Hutchison cancelled his plans to participate in last week's NBA Draft Combine, and most likely will only work out for teams drafting ahead of the franchise that said they would select him.

Jerry Krause would famously try to hide his interest in players he coveted in a particular year and persuade them not to work out for other teams. The best example came in 1987 when a little known player from Central Arkansas named Scottie Pippen became an obsession for Krause, and the Bulls GM tried everything in his power to keep Pippen under wraps. Problem is, Pippen did attend the scouting combine and quickly became the hot topic among NBA scouts and executives. It took some intense work on Krause's part to arrange for the draft night trade that brought Pippen to Chicago for Olden Polynice. Krause also added Horace Grant later in that same draft, and the foundation was built for the Bulls' first three championship teams.

So, the idea of a team making a "promise" to a player they like is certainly nothing new. What's important to understand is that doesn't guarantee the team will follow through on that promise when they're on the clock. Back in 2013, the Bulls got word to Louisville big man Gorgui Dieng they were interested in taking him with their No. 20 pick in round one. But when the Bulls were on the clock, the front office decided they would rather have New Mexico swingman Tony Snell who was ranked higher on their draft board. The Bulls drafted Snell, much to Dieng and his agent's surprise. Dieng wound up going to Utah with the next pick and was traded to Minnesota. He's still with that franchise today, although in a reduced role after the Timberwolves signed Taj Gibson as a free agent last summer.

With so much uncertainty in this year's draft, it seems unlikely the Bulls would "promise" to select Hutchison five weeks before the selection process was going to begin. Hutchison and his agent most likely received assurances from NBA executives that he would be drafted in the 20-30 range, and that was enough to get him to drop out of the combine. But just like in 2013, if the Bulls see a player ranked higher on their draft board fall to 22, that's the player they're going to take.

Hutchison is a good prospect, a 3-and-D player who would fit well with the team the Bulls are building. But he's also a 22-year-old senior without the upside of some of the younger prospects who might be available with the Bulls' pick late in Round 1. Both Hutchison and the Bulls have to reserve the right to protect their own best interests. Hutchison will most likely agree to work out for teams drafting earlier than 22, and he'll have to understand if the Bulls decide to go a different direction on draft night, no matter what kind of previous discussions his agent may have had with the front office.

At this point in the pre-draft process, a "promise" can only be seen as a team's legitimate interest in a given player and an indicator of how the first round is likely to play out. But a lot can and will change before Phoenix goes on the clock on June 21.

Combine notes

Since most of the projected first round picks do little or nothing at the combine, it's left to the second-round guys to try to improve their draft stock with a strong showing in the scrimmage games. Last year, it was Kyle Kuzma working his way into the first round with a dazzling performance at the combine, and this year, the big winner might be Villanova shooting guard Donte DiVincenzo.

The NCAA Tournament hero impressed everyone with his athleticism on both ends and his ability to knock down open shots. DiVincenzo told me his 31-point performance in the title game against Michigan convinced him he had what it takes to apply for early entry, and his strong showing last week probably convinced him to hire an agent and remain in the draft.

Much like Kuzma, DiVincenzo had been projected as a likely second-round pick before the combine. Now he's looked at as a probable first rounder, going somewhere in the 20-30 range, which means he's likely headed to a good team that can ease his transition to the pro game. Not bad for a guy who came off the bench most of the season for the eventual NCAA champs and probably never imagined he would be leaving early for the NBA until that magical night in San Antonio.

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Other players who improved their draft stock last week include USC combo guard De’Anthony Melton, Maryland swingman Kevin Huerter, Tulane shooting guard Melvin Frazier, Cincinnati swingman Jacob Evans and another Villanova product, point guard Jalen Brunson.

Brunson didn't play in the scrimmages in Chicago, but he showed well in the physical testing, displaying the kind of athleticism every team is looking for at the point guard position. It looks like Brunson will definitely be a first round pick.

Similar story for Evans, who averaged a modest 13 points a game for a top 10 Cincinnati team, but impressed the NBA execs at the combine with his tenacious defensive play and offensive potential. Evans could be a possibility for the Bulls at 22.

Maryland's Huerter showed scouts he's more than just a standstill 3-point shooter. The 6-foot-6 sophomore averaged just under 15 points a game last season, shooting almost 42 percent from 3-point range. Huerter's solid play at the combine gives him a chance to be drafted at the end of Round 1.

Frazier also showed enough in games last week to have his name called among the top 30 picks. At 6-foot-6, he has excellent size at the shooting guard position. Frazier averaged just under 16 points a game during his junior season at Tulane, shooting almost 56 percent from the field.

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But the most interesting story involves Melton, who was held out by USC last season because of his connection to the FBI's investigation of corruption in college basketball. Melton maintained his innocence all along, and said the university was just doing what it had to do, fearing additional trouble with the NCAA over allegations a friend of Melton's had accepted money to try to steer Melton to an agent.

Still, even without playing competitively last season, Melton probably cemented a first round selection with his play at the combine. The 6-foot-4 combo guard flashed on both ends, scoring 15 points in a game last Friday playing alongside DiVincenzo in the backcourt.

Melton told USA Today he compares himself to other two-way standouts like Dwyane Wade, Kawhi Leonard and Avery Bradley. That's some pretty impressive company. Melton might be worth the investment of that No. 22 pick by the Bulls.

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Kudos to all the players who took part in the two days of media interviews last week. Almost all of them came off poised and well prepared. Among the top ten picks, I was especially impressed with Michael Porter Jr., who patiently answered all the questions about his back surgery and confidently said he considered himself the best player in the draft without sounding cocky.

Of course, Jaren Jackson Jr. and Trae Young also proclaimed themselves the best player in the draft, and projected top 10 picks Mo Bamba, Wendell Carter Jr. and Collin Sexton also came across as supremely confident.

The latest Basketball Insiders Mock Draft has the Bulls taking Bamba at 7 and Chandler Hutchison at 22, which would make the front office and a lot of Bulls fans very happy. But just to show you the wide range in how draft experts are evaluating the top prospects, Basketball Insiders currently has Jackson Jr. going 11 to Charlotte, and it's hard for me to imagine him staying on the board past four.

Brace yourself for all kinds of wild speculation over the next four weeks.

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Finally, May 22 turned out to be quite a day for Lauri Markkanen. Not only is Markkanen celebrating his 21st birthday, but he found out he was voted to the NBA's All-Rookie first team after averaging 15.2 points and 7.5 rebounds.

Markkanen joined Ben Simmons, Donovan Mitchell, Jayson Tatum and Kyle Kuzma from the extremely talented 2017-18 rookie class.

And the second team isn't bad either with Dennis Smith Jr., Lonzo Ball, Josh Jackson, John Collins and Bogdan Bogdanovic.

Given Markkanen's talent and work ethic, it's very easy to see him making multiple All-Star Game appearances down the line. The Bulls can only hope they come up with another foundation player like Markkanen when they draft seventh for the second year in a row.

Lauri Markkanen celebrates 21st birthday with a spot on the NBA's All-Rookie First Team

Lauri Markkanen celebrates 21st birthday with a spot on the NBA's All-Rookie First Team

Lauri Markkanen’s celebration for his 21st birthday coincided with another major honor, being selected to the All-Rookie First team.

Markkanen received 76 of 100 possible first-team votes to join Utah’s Donovan Mitchell, Philadelphia’s Ben Simmons, Boston’s Jayson Tatum and the Los Angeles Lakers’ Kyle Kuzma on the first team. Mitchell and Simmons were unanimous selections and Tatum was one vote short of joining Mitchell and Simmons.

Markkanen, acquired on draft night in the package of players for Jimmy Butler, showed he was far more advanced than many expected. His 15.2 points per game ranked third among rookies and his 7.5 rebounds were first.

Markkanen was a constant in a topsy-turvy season for the Bulls, scoring 30-plus twice and hitting the 25-point plateau another three times. As a perfect fit in Fred Hoiberg’s offensive system, Markkanen had eight games where he hit four triples or more, including a game in New York where he drilled eight 3-pointers against the Knicks.

Only 15 rookies have hit more than 140 triples in NBA history, with Markkanen accomplishing the feat in 68 games—he was joined by Mitchell and Kuzma from this year’s star-studded class.

As the season progressed and Markkanen took hold of the power forward position, the Bulls began maneuvering personnel around him, trading disgruntled forward Nikola Mirotic and making a concerted effort to put Bobby Portis at center to pair Portis with Markkanen as a spread-shooting duo.

As the most impressive rookie the Bulls have employed since Derrick Rose, he’s also the first rookie since Taj Gibson in 2010 to make All-Rookie First Team.