Bulls

Running with the Bulls: Bosh vs. Johnson

Running with the Bulls: Bosh vs. Johnson

Thursday, April 15, 2010
4:29 PM

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

Even with the Bulls exciting road to making the playoffs -- complete with the turmoil surrounding the team over last week; from the Joakim Noah minutes controversy to reports of alleged physical altercations between Chicago head coach Vinny Del Negro and both team executive vice president John Paxson and general manager Gar Forman --the minds of Bulls observers havent strayed from the future. No, not just the LeBron James, the Cleveland Cavaliers and the Bulls first-round series -- which begins Saturday afternoon -- fans and media alike continue to wonder what will happen July 1, the much-anticipated start of free agency. Actually, the playoffs do relate to the summer, as some believe that Chicago making the postseason may somehow influence some of the top available players to come to the Windy City, as an appearance in the NBAs second season could convince them the Bulls cupboard is a lot more stocked than those of other suitors.

The other day, my Comcast SportsNet colleague Mark Schanowski wrote a piece for his Beyond the Arc blog that detailed some of the moves he thought would be in the Bulls best interest this summer. Now, Mark and I frequently play general manager before home games at the United Center, discussing which direction would be best for the team. Thus, I wasnt surprised when I read that he supports Chicago making a hard push to acquire Toronto superstar Chris Bosh.

I agree with the majority of what Mark wrote, but as I stated on Chicago Tribune Live last week, Im more in favor of the Bulls going after Atlanta swingman Joe Johnson. While Bosh is certainly a top-10 player in the league, Im not sure his game is best suited for what Chicago needs.

Bosh is a strong interior force who has proven to be a reliable 20-point, 10-rebound performer for the Raptors. Over the past few years, hes silenced critics who have accused him of being soft by continually developing his low-post game and becoming a better rebounder and defender in the paint.

At the same time, Bosh is most comfortable being an inside-outside threat, particularly facing the basket from 15 to 18 feet away, where he can knock down open mid-range jumpers or drive by slower big men. While the Bulls dont currently have a player who is as proficient offensively in that area, center Noah has been expanding his range and knocking down jumpers from the elbow as of late, rookie Taj Gibson has proven to be a consistent mid-range threat and small forward Luol Deng is probably at his best in that area, where he can shoot pull-up jumpers after a dribble or two. Dont forget that All-Star point guard Derrick Rose is at times deadly accurate on his stop-and-pop jumpers off quick penetration moves.

However, Im not blind -- its obvious the Bulls need some offensive help, specifically a true go-to scorer that allows Rose to be the playmaker he naturally is, as his scoring outbursts this season have often come out of necessity rather than his desire to put up big point totals -- I just think outside shooting is the teams most pressing need. Ill come back to my ideas of a top free agent the Bulls should go afte -- cough, Joe Johnson, cough -- but lets first continue to touch on Bosh.

As Mark pointed out in his post, Torontos top executive, Bryan Colangelo, has made it clear that he would prefer a sign-and-trade scenario to losing Bosh outright. The usual suspects -- Miami, New York, New Jersey -- will likely make an attempt to woo Bosh, not to mention Dallas, which could have the pieces to lure the Raptors into sending Bosh back to his hometown. Dont be surprised if the Lakers and Rockets also enter the fray.

If the Bulls were to present a sign-and-trade option, Mark suggests a package of Deng, Kirk Hinrich, Gibson and one or more draft picks could do the trick, as far as swaying Toronto to do a deal with Chicago for Bosh. On the surface, that does sound like the Raptors would end up with some more-than-serviceable pieces, however, I doubt Colangelo would bite -- unless he had no better options -- as the contracts of Deng and Hinrich arent exactly attractive and as well as Gibson has played this year, his effectiveness could be limited by the Raptors lack of an inside presence (minus Bosh, of course), something Bulls fans witnessed as the rookie wore down with the attention opponents showed him during Noahs extended absence.

In addition, in order to make salaries match, Toronto would have to throw in additional players. If you saw Sundays big Bulls win, there arent too many desirable players on the Raptors roster, and even if Chicago was interested in a few of them -- say, athletic swingman Sonny Weems or developing big man Amir Johnson -- its unlikely Colangelo would part with those high-potential youngsters, preferring to peddle a big-contract veteran with less value on the court. Regardless, it is something to consider.

Now, lets get back to Atlantas Johnson; we can even start with his flaws. At 28 (29 this summer), hes older than Bosh, so this will likely be his last big contract. While hes regarded as one of the most complete players in the league, the smooth swingman does have a reputation for being a ball-stopper on offense -- Hawks fans nicknamed Atlanta head coach Mike Woodsons fourth-quarter offensive strategy the Iso-Joe offense -- if not a volume shooter.

And while Johnson is accustomed to being the top offensive option for the Hawks, that doesnt necessarily have to change if he were to come to Chicago -- as Rose is more of a natural playmaker; he can certainly score, but is unselfish by nature, and surely wouldnt mind the addition of another player that could create shot opportunities -- although he might have to alter his style of play a bit. Unlike Bosh, however, Johnson hasnt indicated any preference to be the guy in his next destination, if he indeed leaves Atlanta.

Dont get me wrong -- both Bosh and Johnson are low-key individuals and havent proven to have any character issues on or off the court, something the Bulls value as an organization -- but Bosh is reported to take exception to the assumption that hed willingly sign on with the Heat, for example, to be a supporting actor in Dwyane Wades South Beach superstardom. How would he embrace playing second fiddle to Derrick Rose -- regardless of accolades and achievements, its unlikely that Bosh is enough a transcendent star to not be in the shadow of Rose, one of the leagues shining lights and a Chicago native, to boot -- in the All-Star point guards hometown?

Johnson, on the other hand, is known as one of the most mild-mannered and shy great players in the league. The Little Rock, Ark., native would fit in perfectly with the Bulls mostly unassuming (save for the exception of Noah) bunch.

Hed be a perfect fit on the court, too. One of the most polished and versatile scorers in the league, its not out of the realm of possibility that he could become an even more efficient scorer, thanks to playing with a true point guard like Rose, similar to his initial rise to stardom while playing next to Steve Nash in Phoenix.

Johnson is a prolific long-range shooter, but hes also a master of the mid-range game, arguably among the leagues best when pulling up off the dribble. As a ballhandler, hes a wiz, with the ability to break down opponents and get to the rim, where he smoothly finishes with his powerful, 6-foot-7, 240-pound frame. In fact, Johnson handles the ball well enough that he can be a de facto point guard on occasion, perhaps potentially enabling Rose to play off the ball at times (causing him less wear and tear, as well as allowing him to attack the defense from the wing as a scorer) and giving Chicago another playmaking threat to draw the defense and create easy opportunities for the likes of Noah down low.

Although hes definitely a perimeter player, Johnsons aforementioned strength also allows him to be able to post up smaller shooting guards, something that could compensate for not bringing in a top-flight big man. After all, having a back-to-the-basket game isnt only limited to seven-foot centers, as Magic Johnson (let alone smaller guards like Sam Cassell, Tim Hardaway and currently, Chauncey Billups) once proved. On top of those factors, Joe Johnson is a solid rebounder for a guard and is a willing defender who doesnt shy away from taking on his most talented contemporaries on both ends on the floor, something that also jibes with Chicagos style of play. Bosh, while not a terrible defender and a player who at least tries on that end of the floor, isnt exactly known as a defensive presence.

The package Johnson brings to the table on the court is simply too attractive to pass up, but is it even guaranteed that he wont return to the Hawks? Bosh is seen as a goner from Canada this summer, no matter what, but sources have mixed opinions on whether Johnson will leave Atlanta. With the Hawks on the brink of being a contender and Johnson having suffered through some rough times after leaving the Suns to be a major part of that process, its open for debate whether hell bolt, both due to the emotional attachment factor and the simple fact that Atlanta can give him that sixth year (which is what fuels the wide misconception that teams can pay their own stars much more money than their competitors; they simply have the option to add another year to the contract) may make it tough for him to find a new residence.

Still, some Atlanta sources believe Johnson will go wherever the money takes him, meaning that inferior teams like New York (its speculated that the long-standing relationship between Johnsons agent, Arn Tellem, and top Knicks executive Donnie Walsh could influence his decision) and New Jersey could have a shot at the scorer, hoping his desire to cash in on likely his final big payday and ego will override his sense of competitiveness.

Regardless, if the Bulls were to add Johnson, theres a slight possibility -- salary-cap experts should start crunching the numbers now -- that theyd have enough money left over to add a second-tier big man, such as Utahs Carlos Boozer or New Yorks David Lee, filling the teams need for a low-post threat. While Im high on Gibson, the rookie hasnt yet developed into a consistent scoring threat that can draw double teams on the box and in fact, Im even higher on Boozer -- as far as for what Chicago needs; Im not arguing hes a better player than Bosh, however, his more traditional back-to-the-basket style may be a better fit for the team -- as the correct piece to the puzzle, especially since he probably wont command a max deal.

Lee is less of a guarantee, as far as how much he can help the Bulls -- hes even more of a face-up offensive player and deficient defender than Bosh and some even theorize his improved play is a product of Knicks head coach Mike DAntonis up-tempo system -- but he would be a less costly acquisition, is younger than Boozer and has less mileage than Bosh. Other options the Bulls could consider are rugged, less high-profile veterans like Houstons Luis Scola and Miamis Udonis Haslem -- although both of their teams have expressed interest in re-signing them -- who would allow Gibson to continue to develop without eating as heavily into his minutes.

Anyway, the long and short of it is (mostly long, as evidenced by the length of this piece) is that Johnson should be the Bulls most realistic top target come July 1. While Bosh wouldnt be a bad acquisition -- in fact, if any big name leans toward Chicago, the Bulls shouldnt hesitate in sealing the deal; so tenuous is the market, especially with all the build-up -- but as far as what the team ideally needs, Johnson would be round peg for Chicagos round hole.

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.coms Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

Versatility is Wendell Carter Jr's calling card

Versatility is Wendell Carter Jr's calling card

Wendell Carter Jr. didn’t come to the NBA Draft Combine with the boastful statements made by his peers, refusing to declare himself the best player in a loaded draft.

But it doesn’t mean he lacks for confidence.

Carter Jr. is one of the more intriguing prospects in next month’s draft, even though he doesn’t come with the heavy fanfare of what many expect to be the top three picks.

One of those top three players was Carter Jr’s teammate at Duke, Marvin Bagley III, relegating Carter Jr. to a supporting role of sorts in his lone collegiate season. He couldn’t turn college basketball upside down as a freshman; He didn’t have the opportunity to, still averaging 13.5 points, 9.1 rebounds and 2.1 blocks in 29.1 minutes last season.

“Bagley's a phenomenal player. He came into college basketball, did what he was supposed to do,” Carter Jr. said. “My role changed a little bit but like I said, I'm a winner and I'll do what it takes to win.”

Like he said, considering it was the fifth time he patted himself on the back, describing his positive attributes. It didn’t come across as obnoxious, but more an affirmation, a reminder that his willingness to sacrifice personal glory shouldn’t overshadow his ability.

“I'm pretty versatile as a player,” Carter Jr. said. “I'd just find a way to fit into the team, buy into the system. I'm a winner. Do whatever it takes to win.”

When asked about his strengths, he didn’t hesitate to say he’s “exceptional” at rebounding and defending, certainly things teams would love to see come to fruition if he’s in their uniform next season.

Playing next to Bagley and not being the first option—or even the second when one considers Grayson Allen being on the perimeter—forced him to mature more in the little things.

“It was (an adjustment) at first,” Carter Jr. said. “I knew what I could do without scoring the ball. I did those things. I did them very exceptional. I found a way to stand out from others without having to put the ball in the basket.”

“I think it did do wonders for me. It definitely helped me out, allowed me to show I can play with great players but still maintain my own.”

If he’s around at the seventh slot, the Bulls will likely take a hard look at how he could potentially fit next to Lauri Markkanen and in the Bulls’ meeting with Carter Jr., the subject was broached.

“Great process. I was just thinking, me and him together playing on the court together would be a killer,” he said with a smile.

“I know they wanna get up and down the court more. The NBA game is changing, there's no more true centers anymore. They wanna have people who can shoot from the outside, it's something I'll have to work on through this draft process.”

An executive from a franchise in the lottery said Carter Jr’s game is more complete than Bagley’s, and that Carter Jr. could be the safer pick even if he isn’t more talented than his teammate.

It’s no surprise Carter Jr. has been told his game reminds them of Celtics big man Al Horford. Horford has helped the Celtics to a commanding 2-0 lead in the Eastern Conference Finals over the Cleveland Cavaliers, in no small part due to his inside-outside game and ability to ably defend guards and wings on the perimeter.

Horford doesn’t jump off the screen, but he’s matured into a star in his role after coming into the NBA with a pretty grown game as is. Carter Jr. has shown flashes to validate those comparisons.

“Whatever system I come to, I buy in,” Carter Jr. said. “Coaches just want to win. I want to win too. Whatever they ask me to do. If it's rebounding, blocking shots, setting picks, I'm willing to do that just to win.”

He was also told he compares to Draymond Green and LaMarcus Aldridge, two disparate players but players the Bulls have had a history with in the draft. The Bulls passed on Green in the first round of the 2012 draft to take Marquis Teague, and in Aldridge’s case, picked him second in 2007 before trading him to Portland for Tyrus Thomas.

As one can imagine, neither scenario has been suitable for framing in the Bulls’ front office, but whether they see Carter Jr. as a the next versatile big in an increasingly positionless NBA remains to be seen.

“I definitely buy into that (positionless basketball). I'm a competitor,” Carter Jr. said. “Especially on the defensive end. Working on my lateral quickness, just so I could guard guards on pick and roll actions. Offensively I didn't show much of it at Duke but I'm pretty versatile. I can bring it up the court. Can shoot it from deep, all three levels.”

His versatility has come into play off the floor as well, deftly answering questions about his mother comparing the NCAA’s lack of compensation for athletes to slavery.

Carter Jr’s mother, Kylia Carter, spoke at the Knight Comission on Intercollegiate Athletics recently and made the claim.

“The only system I have ever seen where the laborers are the only people that are not being compensated for the work that they do, while those in charge receive mighty compensation … The only two systems where I’ve known that to be in place is slavery and the prison system, and now I see the NCAA as overseers of a system that is identical to that.”

As if he needed to add context to the statement, Carter Jr. indulged the media members who asked his opinion on the matter—or at least, his opinion of his mother’s opinion.

“A lot of people thought she was saying players were slaves and coaches were slave owners,” Carter Jr. said. “Just the fact, we do go to college, we're not paid for working for someone above us and the person above us is making all the money.”

As sensible as his comment was, as direct as his mother’s statements were, he still finds himself in a position where he has to defend his mother. In some cases, teams asked him about her—but that’s not to say they disagreed with her premise.

“My mom is my mom,” Carter Jr. said. “She has her opinions and doesn't mind sharing them. In some aspects I do agree with her. In others...you'll have to ask her if you want to know more information.”

“I never thought my mom is ever wrong. But I think people do perceive her in the wrong way. Some things she does say...that's my mom. You have to ask her.”

The versatility to handle things out of his control, as well as understanding how his season at Duke prepared him for walking into an NBA locker room should be noted.

There’s no delusions of grandeur, despite his unwavering confidence.

“I'd come in and try to outwork whoever's in front of me,” Carter Jr. said. “That's the beauty of the beast. You come into a system, There's players in front of you 3-4-5 years and know what it takes.”

“I would learn those things and let the best man win.”

After historical season at Oklahoma, Trae Young ready to make immediate impact in NBA

After historical season at Oklahoma, Trae Young ready to make immediate impact in NBA

There once was a period in NBA Draft history when leading the country in scoring all but guaranteed a top-5 draft pick. All-Americans were the talk of the class, and if he could pass, too, all the entire better. And if that player was a freshman? Forget about it.

But there’s never been a time in history when a player led the country in both scoring and assists. And it was done by a freshman, all of 19 years old. And yet for all Oklahoma point guard Trae Young accomplished in 32 games, doubters remain. He’s not the consensus top pick in next month’s NBA Draft. He might not even be a top-5 pick. He could even fall out of the top 10.

And that’s because the draft has become a science, of sorts. Position-less basketball is taking over, multiple ball handlers are on the floor for a team more time than they’re not, and height/length/wingspan and the rest of those Jay Bilas buzzwords mean more than ever.

And that is Young’s shortcoming (no pun intended). We’ll get the negatives out of the way before telling you why the Sooner is built perfectly for today’s NBA. He measured just under 6-foot-2 and weighed in at 178 pounds, which he told reporters was 10 pounds heavier than he was five weeks ago. His 6-foot-3 wingpsan was the smallest of all NBA Draft Combine participants, as was his 8-inch hand length.

So it’s reasonable to understand why he isn’t a slam dunk option at the top of the draft. But there’s also a number of reasons this 6-foot-2, defensive liability could also hear his name called in the top 5. And it’s because he’s the most dynamic offensive player college basketball has maybe ever seen. And, for the third time, he’s 19 years old.

“I think I’m the best overall player in the draft," he said Friday at the NBA Draft Combine. "My main focus isn’t necessarily to be the best player in this draft. My motivation is to be the best player in the NBA and that’s what I’m focusing on each and every day.”

Young, a five-star recruit from Norman, Okla., double-doubled in his first collegiate game. He double-doubled in his second game. In games 3-8 he scored between 28 and 43 points, all while leading unranked Oklahoma to an unlikely 7-1 record. Then December 16 happened. And over the course of the next eight games Young took college basketball by storm.

In a span of one month, from Dec. 15 to Jan. 15, Oklahoma went from unranked to No. 4 in the country. Young’s numbers in that eight-game stretch? 31.4 points, 11.3 assists, 4.9 made 3-pointers and 1.6 steals in better than 34 minutes per game. His lowest scoring output in that time frame was 26, and in that game he handed out 22 assists, which tied an NCAA record. He had double-doubles in seven of the eight games, and had to settle for 29 points and five assists on the road against West Virginia, one of the country’s top defenses.

Young’s Sooners went into a nosedive after that, going 4-10 to finish the regular season and putting them close to the bubble, especially after a loss to Oklahoma State in the Big 12 Tournament. Young, the catalyst and only real option for the Sooners, posted modest 24.5 points and 7.5 assists, but wasn’t able to get a hold of the runaway train. The Sooners lost their opening round matchup to Rhode Island, a game in which Young scored 28 points.

But the roller coaster season is in the rear-view mirror. Young’s game is pretty straightforward: he’s a pick and roll nightmare for defenses, has the best range of anyone in the country and finds open shooters with ease. He’s a do-it-all offensively, and has naturally drawn comparisons to Stephen Curry.

“I love the comparisons. He’s a two-time MVP and a champion,” Youg said. “I’m just trying to be the best version of Trae Young, that’s all that matters to me. I’m just getting started in this thing.”

Young will make his presence felt wherever he winds up on June 21. Though he needs to continue adding weight to withstand the physical nature of the NBA (as well as an 82-game season) his skill set was built for today’s game. Though his shooting numbers came at a rather inefficient clip – 42 percent shooting, 36 percent from 3 – those will improve as he’s asked to take fewer shots at the next level.

His passing numbers should also improve; despite the 8.7 assists per game he wasn’t exactly paired up with knockdown shooters in Norman. If a team is able to pair him next to a stout defender – not unlike Isaiah Thomas playing next to Avery Bradley in Boston – his offensive game will cancel out any defensive deficiencies.

“My main focus is going to the right team,” he said. “It’s all about the fit for me and whether that’s (No.) 1 or whatever it is, I’m going to be happy and ready to make an impact and that’s what they’re going to get.”

That impact will be felt. Young opted against naming teams – he has met with the Bulls, he said – but mentioned that he has looked at teams picking in this year’s Lottery and knows the playoffs are a possibility if he enters the mix and leaves his imprint on a team in Year 1.

“There are teams in this draft that I think are one piece away, two pieces away from being a team that’s in the Lottery this year but not next year,” Young said. “There’s been some teams that I’ve met with I feel like if I’m on that team that I can make a big impact for them.”

He made that impact at Oklahoma, and despite his measurements there’s nothing to dislike about his game. He set records, carried a team for four months and dealt with adversity. That, as well as a lethal jump shot, will have him ready for the next level and whatever team selects him in six weeks.