Bulls

Running with the Bulls: NBA midseason awards

Running with the Bulls: NBA midseason awards

Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2011
Posted: 1:20 p.m.

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

Before every NBA season, there are players and teams that the so-called experts (this writer included) believe will dominate headlines and then fail to live up to the hype right away. After the first few weeks of the season, more predictions are made based on the early returns, with observers going out on a limb to proclaim that those who have made immediate impacts will sustain their effectiveness over the course of the campaign. The halfway point of the season, while not a crystal ball, is a much more accurate way of determining future successes or failures. But instead of making any hare-brained claims, let's take a look at the NBA's top first-half performers.
MVP: Derrick Rose, Chicago Bulls
Forget about this being the obvious homer pick and let's examine his candidacy. One front-runner, Dallas' Dirk Nowitzki has missed significant time due to injury, leading to the Mavericks' recent slide. Another, New York's Amar'e Stoudemire, has been excellent, but his Knicks have also swooned lately. Miami's duo of LeBron James and Dwyane Wade have effectively separated themselves from the other, potentially splitting votes--or garnering less momentum because of their partnership--at season's end. Kobe Bryant hasn't had a vintage season and at least right now, neither are his Lakers. The only other player in the league who presents a credible threat at the midseason point is Orlando's Dwight Howard, but since winning does play a factor--it might be prudent to see how the Magic's overhaul plays out in the long run--Rose's guidance of the Bulls to success (without co-stars Joakim Noah andor Carlos Boozer for long stretches) wins out at this juncture.
Rookie of the Year: Blake Griffin, Los Angeles Clippers

Is there any other choice? Not only is Blake Griffin already arguably the league's most exciting player, but he's managed to not only lead the perennially-lowly Clippers to the brink of respectability as of late, he's reinvigorated enigmatic point guard Baron Davis, possibly extending former Bulls head coach Vinny Del Negro's Hollywood shelf life in the process. Griffin isn't just good for a rookie, he's a dominant force, as evidenced by his NBA season-high 47 points Monday. The scary thing is, he's only going to get better.

Coach of the Year: Gregg Popovich, San Antonio Spurs

Maybe the Spurs are still boring as far as personalities are concerned, but nobody can accuse them of playing that way this season. Popovich has completely flipped their style of play, turning San Antonio into a run-and-gun team, de-emphasizing future Hall of Famer Tim Duncan on the offensive end (which many suspect is a ploy to save his legs for the grind-it-out, halfcourt-heavy playoffs) and making the up-tempo nature of backcourt stars Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili the team's new focal point. In addition to having likely the league's best backcourt, "Pop" has gotten through to small forward Richard Jefferson and has melded a seemingly haphazard bunch of role players (such as 26-year-old sharpshooting rookie Gary Neal and roly-poly undersized second-year bruiser DeJuan Blair) into an exemplary complementary unit, resulting in the league's best record.
Most Improved Player: Kevin Love, Minnesota Timberwolves

Another no-brainer, as Love, the league's top rebounder, has become the bizarro Dennis Rodman this season. The wide-bodied, ground-bound power forward Kevin Love is a freak of nature on the glass in today's NBA, recording multiple 20-point, 20-rebound games, including a high of 31 boards in one night. Defensively challenged, Love is a savvy and versatile offensive performer, with comfortable 3-point range, excellent passing ability and old-school sensibilities. Although he toils for an awful Minnesota squad, Love a must-see attraction, despite his decidedly below-the-rim game.
Most surprising team: New York Knicks

Although they haven't been as good lately--losing the element of surprise is a factor--the fact that the Knicks are one of the better teams in the Eastern Conference is a bit of a shocker, especially given their slow start to the season. Much of the credit can be given to the elite play of their top offseason acquisition Stoudemire (getting his former player back, as well as others who fit his "Seven Seconds or Less" system is obviously a big part of Mike D'Antoni's turnaround of the team), but the squad's supporting cast--the likes of floor general Raymond Felton, sharpshooter Danilo Gallinari, versatile forward Wilson Chandler and rookie Landry Fields have all played significant roles--has been much better than advertised, bringing legitimate excitement back to the Big Apple for the first time in more than a decade.

Most disappointing team: Milwaukee Bucks
After last season's "Fear the Dear" run, expectations were high for the Bucks, particularly after an offseason that many observers thought was quietly among the league's best. But injuries to second-year point guard Brandon Jennings and others, as well as star center Andrew Bogut's not-yet-complete return to form have derailed Milwaukee. One of the NBA's most inept scoring teams, they have simply been unable to regain the magic that carried them last season. In the top-heavy East, there's still time to make a run, but it's doubtful they'll be able to build on the progress made a year ago.

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.com's Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

Bulls Talk Podcast: How NBA Draft combine impacted mock drafts

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USA TODAY

Bulls Talk Podcast: How NBA Draft combine impacted mock drafts

On this edition of the Bulls Talk Podcast, Mark Schanowski and Kendall Gill discuss the NBA Draft and what happened at the NBA combine that shifted most experts mock drafts.

Kendall also explains why a "promise" to draft a player isn’t guaranteed. He also shares his experience on getting drafted by the Hornets and why he initially felt they were the wrong team for him.

North Carolina "News and Observer" Duke basketball beat writer Jonathan Alexander gives us his opinion on Wendell Carter and the other Duke draft prospects including why he thinks Carter will be a future all-star. Also includes an interview with Carter from the draft combine.

Listen to the full Bulls Talk Podcast right here:

The next preps-to-pros leaper, Anfernee Simons confident 'I'll be able to make this jump'

The next preps-to-pros leaper, Anfernee Simons confident 'I'll be able to make this jump'

Anfernee Simons looks more like a ball boy than a 2018 NBA Draft prospect right now. He’s not considered small, what with having a 6-foot-3 frame with a massive 6-foot-9 wingspan, and he weighed in at last week’s NBA Draft Combine at 183 pounds, “heavier” than Lottery-bound guards like Trae Young, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander and Collin Sexton.

But there’s plenty of potential to unpack from the soon-to-be 19-year-old, baby-faced combo guard. Don’t let the appearance fool you. Simons is one of the most talented players in the class, and a team patient enough to let him develop at his own pace could reap major benefits in due time.

You won’t find much video on Simons, as the IMG Academy star is preparing to be the first prospect to go preps-to-pros without a year in college since Thon Maker did so in 2016.

Simons, a consensus five-star recruit in the 2018 class, originally committed to Louisville in November 2016 and then decommitted the following September shortly after Rick Pitino was fired. Since he had graduated from Edgewater High School in Florida and was playing a post-grad year at IMG Academy, he became eligible for the 2018 NBA Draft because he is a year removed from high school. That’s where he played this past season, declaring for the draft and signing with an agent in late March.

“The opportunity is there. Me and my parents talked about it a lot and I feel like I’m confident in myself that I’ll be able to make this jump,” he said at last week’s Combine. “So I just felt like, do it now and not waste any time.”

Simons has been on the radars of NBA teams, even if he’s not a household name like Ayton, Doncic and Bagley. He’s currently projected outside of the Lottery, in part because teams haven’t seen him compete against collegiate level talent and because his wiry frame almost surely means time in the G-League as a rookie. But again, the skill set is there.

Simons is a point guard with solid range beyond the arc. He may struggle off the ball because of his size, though that long wingspan and a quick release from his chest should allow him to get off shots. He’s a blur in transition and finishes well at the rim – his 41.5-inch vertical was tied for third best at the Combine, and his three-quarters court sprint was eighth fastest.

He’s a mixed bag defensively. Wingspan is the fun buzz word these days, and that will help him at the next level, but his small frame means there’s work to be done. A strength and conditioning coach will salivate at bringing Simons into the weight room and getting his body NBA-ready.

“Just staying durable through 82 games,” Simons answered when asked about his biggest challenge physically at the next level. “Taking care of your body is real pivotal so I feel like learning how to take care of my body now is a good thing.”

Simons maturely answered that the “unknown” of his game will be both a positive and minus during the pre-draft process. While fellow prospects he may face in team workouts don’t know as much about him and, thus, his game, teams also need to find out more about Simons’ game and off-court habits.

“Coming in young, people don’t know who I am and haven’t seen me play much. That’s the good side about coming in early,” he said. “It could be the same thing (negatively). People haven’t seen me like that, so I feel like they don’t know who I am. They probably think I’m too young to play in the league.”

Simons met with the Bulls and has scheduled a pre-draft workout with them. Though the Bulls feel like their rebuild could go quicker than anticipated – especially if they hit on their No. 7 pick – there could be plenty to gain from drafting for upside on a player like Simons.

Jerian Grant and Cameron Payne will both be free agents in 2019, and Denzel Valentine’s long-term future isn’t set in stone in Chicago. That leaves plenty of openings in the backcourt behind Kris Dunn and Zach LaVine. Simons won’t be ready to contribute much in 2018-19, but the Bulls wouldn’t need him to. A handful of outlets projected Simons as a top-5 pick in the 2019 NBA Draft. The Bulls could snag him a year earlier, let him develop in Hoffman Estates and bring him up in a year when they’re a step closer to contending.