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Scouting the NCAA: Power Forwards and Centers

Scouting the NCAA: Power Forwards and Centers

Sunday, Apr. 4, 2010
5:20 P.M.

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

On the eve of the NCAA Tournament's national championship game--who could imagine hometown Butler would make it to Indianapolis, let alone get to the championship game?--here is the final installment of college players who are prospects in the upcoming NBA Draft, with a slant toward those who could be available when the Bulls make the selection and fit the team's needs. While several post players are expected to go extremely high in the draft this June, there are also some options outside of the elite prospects. Please note that some of these players are centers for their college teams, but will play power forward on the pro level, so the respective positions are combined here.
POWER FORWARDS AND CENTERS
Overview: Although Kentucky's Patrick Patterson is projected to be a lottery pick, the 6-foot-9 junior isn't viewed as having the same upside as other prospects, so the bruiser could slip, depending on the needs of various teams. Georgetown sophomore Greg Monroe is in a similar boat--although he might opt to return for another season, unlike Patterson who will graduate in three years--as his skill set, albeit unique, may not fit every franchise, as the 6-foot-11 southpaw is more of a finesse, passing big man than a true low-block big man.

A pair of post players who weren't on the radar as future pros when the season started, but are now considered at least borderline lottery selections are Baylor's Ekpe Udoh and freshman Hassan Whiteside of Marshall. Whiteside, a seven-footer, is still raw offensively, but his athleticism, shot-blocking ability and strong numbers this season has NBA personnel types salivating, despite coming from a mid-major program. The 6-foot-11 Udoh, a junior transfer from Michigan (where he wasn't much of a standout), is also an excellent shot-blocker, but adds another dimension as a versatile offensive player, as his unorthodox game intrigues next-level decision-makers.

True centers Solomon Alabi, Andrew Ogilvy, Dexter Pittman and Jerome Jordan form a quartet that intrigues pro teams, but each of the players have holes that worry teams. Alabi, a 7-foot-1 shot-blocking force from Florida State, has the defensive presence and athleticism NBA franchises love, but lacks strength and is raw on offense. Vanderbilt's Ogilvy, a native of Australia, has some similarities to countryman Andrew Bogut of the Milwaukee Bucks, but doesn't possess Bogut's athletic ability and projects as more of a role player, although he's skilled--albeit basic--on the offensive end and has the requisite size for his position. While Alabi and Ogilvy are underclassmen with the option to go back to school, Texas' Pittman and Tulsa's Jordan are both seniors. Pittman's massive weight loss throughout his college career speaks to his work ethic, but he is still a project, although his touch and huge frame have scouts convinced he will be drafted at some point, likely in the second round. Jordan may have faced mid-major competition, but he is a known commodity, and like the aforementioned Alabi, he is coveted for his defense and agility, and is a bit more offensively polished.

A group of potential early-entry candidates at power forward are also high on the radar of NBA teams. Georgia Tech's Gani Lawal was overshadowed by teammate and likely lottery pick Derrick Favors, a freshman, this season, but his bruising style and physical, blue-collar mentality appear to be able to translate well to the pro level. Iowa State's Craig Brackins came into the season with high expectations and although he had a bit of a disappointing year, his high skill level and ability to face the basket may be a good fit for teams looking for some versatility. Larry Sanders of Virginia Commonwealth is still somewhat of a project, but his athleticism, rebounding and tremendous shot-blocking talent should earn him a niche as a role player, even though his offense is behind his defense at this stage. JaJuan Johnson of Purdue is in a similar boat, as he needs to significantly bulk up, but showed major signs of development as a high-energy, pogo stick-type on both ends, especially in the wake of the season-ending injury to teammate and Boilermakers star Robbie Hummel.

Lastly, we come to a trio of seniors who have established themselves as college stars, but aren't viewed as having the same ceiling as their counterparts. Mississippi State's Jarvis Varnado is one of the most prolific shot-blockers in the history of the college game, but his rail-thin frame and relative lack of offensive prowess has professional organizations wary. Likewise, Notre Dame's Luke Harangody has done everything he can possibly do to improve his stock--increase his shooting range, get his once-flabby body into better shape and continue to dominate the Big East's considerable interior talent as an inside scorer and rebounder--but his lack of explosiveness and size are regarded as deterrents for his future success moving forward. Trevor Booker of Clemson has the necessary strength and explosiveness to make it in the NBA and although his height, at 6-foot-7, is seen as a minus, he is low-maintenance player who doesn't require a lot of touches to be productive, so while he may never be a big scorer, his toughness and workhorse nature may make him a high-value pick in the second round.

Scout's take: "It's always so hard to get that true back-to-the-basket guy beyond the lottery...the majority of points scored in the paint in the modern NBA are scored through dribble penetration."

Potential lottery picks: Cousins, Favors, Aldrich, Monroe, Davis, Patterson

Bulls fit: Booker

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.coms Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more and read his Running with the Bulls blog.

Bulls not a part of Anthony Davis-to-the-Lakers trade, but it could have an effect on the draft

Bulls not a part of Anthony Davis-to-the-Lakers trade, but it could have an effect on the draft

Farewell, Lonzo Ball-to-the-Bulls rumors.

ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski reported Saturday evening that the Los Angeles Lakers have finally acquired Anthony Davis from the New Orleans Pelicans, and the deal doesn't include a third team.

In exchange for Davis, a six-time All-Star about to enter his prime, the Pelicans recieved Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and three first round picks, including the No. 4 pick in next week's NBA Draft.

There was some speculation - also reported by Woj - that a third team would need to get involved in order to satisfy what Pelicans GM David Griffin was looking for in a package for Davis.

Though the Bulls were never directly connected in reports as a potential third team, it made sense considering they own the No. 7 pick and have a need at point guard.

There was also some speculation - though, again, never concrete news or reports - that Zach LaVine could have been an option in a deal, with the Bulls acquiring the No. 4 pick.

Alas, the Bulls aren't part of the deal. But it still may have an effect on them.

The Pelicans now own the Nos. 1 and 4 picks in next week's draft. They're obviously going to take Duke forward Zion Williamson with the first pick but now have options at No. 4. Whereas the Lakers had been linked to Vanderbilt poing guard Darius Garland, the Pelicans really don't have a need there with Ball and Jrue Holiday in the backcourt.

That, in theory, could bump Garland down to No. 6 and the Phoenix Suns, which would then free up the Bulls to take North Carolina's Coby White at No. 7.

Wojnarowski also reported that teams are still inquiring about the No. 4 pick from the Pelicans. It's unlikely the Bulls would depart with LaVine though maybe they could put together some sort of package to move up from No. 7.

What's more likely is the Bulls keep their assets intact in such a weak draft class and move forward with the best player available on the board at No. 7.

But it's officially Woj Bomb season, so buckle up. As is the case every NBA offseason, anything can and will happen.

NBC Sports Boston's Trade Bot comes up with Kris Dunn-Terry Rozier trade

dunn_rozier.jpg
USA TODAY

NBC Sports Boston's Trade Bot comes up with Kris Dunn-Terry Rozier trade

The NBA landscape is getting ready to undergo a dramatic makeover this offseason, with the vast number of free agents and the volatility of the 2019 draft class. While the Bulls and Boston Celtics are two teams that could have much different views of success next season, they also could be ideal trade partners. Our partners at NBC Sports Boston laid out an intriguing trade offer that certainly got Celtics fans talking.

The NBC Sports Boston “Trade Bot 3000” came up with a scenario in which Danny Ainge targets Bulls guard Kris Dunn.

LINK:

This does not come as a huge shock, as GM Danny Ainge has had a liking for Dunn’s game dating back to the 2016 NBA Draft, when he reportedly almost traded then-Celtic Isaiah Thomas fior a lottery pick to select Dunn. Of course since then things have changed quite a bit, as Dunn has failed to develop into a real threat from the perimeter and his great defensive effort has been dragged down by foul troubles (4.3 fouls per 36 minutes).

NBC Sports Boston’s Trade Bot pointed out that Boston would be receiving the New London, Connecticut native with a full season before he is set to hit restricted free agency (2020-21). Dunn’s team-friendly contract would make sense for a Celtics team that is unlikely to have any functional cap space this offseason. And even in the event that the Celtics do create near max cap space, that would likely mean that guards Terry Rozier and Kyrie Irving are no longer on the roster.

Dunn would be a solid option as a starter or backup guard for a new-look Celtics squad that would be built around feeding Jayson Tatum plenty of looks, much more than the 13.1 field goal attempts per game that he averaged over the 2018-19 season. Dunn’s usage rate dropped a significant amount last season and his offensive rating improved as a result of him using less possessions. I would expect that trend to continue under Brad Stevens, who would find more creative ways to keep Dunn involved on offense.

It is simple to see how the trade would be appealing from the Bulls perspective. Though incredibly similar prospects, Rozier presents a greater threat from the 3-point line as compared to Dunn.

He is by no means a knockdown shooter, but the fact that “Scary Terry” has taken 6.3 attempts from 3-point range per 36 minutes (for his career per Basketball-Reference)  definitely matters.

Defenses will have to account for Rozier when he is on the floor, making him a nice partner for LaVine on the offensive end of the floor. But again, Rozier would not be a savior at the PG position. He has many of the same flaws as Dunn, such as generating a tremendously low amount of free throw attempts. As we all know, a fresh start can do wonders for a young player and a trade of this nature would allow the Bulls to add Rozier, while giving him the true maximum salary that only the Celtics would be able to offer.

To make matters even better for Chicago, the Bulls would be collecting a second round pick as well for swapping a player on a rookie deal for a player who is due for a significant raise. One last interesting nugget on a possible Dunn-for-Rozier trade is that the two guards are actually one day apart age-wise. They are at a similar stage in their careers/development, to the point where it would be tough to say which team won the trade.

Let us know how you would feel about NBC Sports Boston Trade Bot’s Dunn-for-Rozier swap at @BullsTalk!