Bulls

Three observations from the Bulls' 3-0 lead

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Three observations from the Bulls' 3-0 lead

MILWAUKEE — A few observations on the Bulls-Bucks series, where the Bulls can pull off a sweep and take a week of rest before the second round begins, presumably against the Cleveland Cavaliers.

1. The Milwaukee Bucks are giving them a great fight and will be a formidable foe in the future:

Like most teams down 3-0, the Bucks feel they’re a couple plays or moments away from being in this series or leading. That may be delusional thinking, but Khris Middleton did have a good look at the end of regulation Thursday night before the extra 10 minutes of basketball drained everyone in the BMO Harris Bradley Center.

[MORE: Goodwill: Game 3 provides Bucks, Bulls playoff lessons]

The Bulls certainly played with fire throughout, as the Bucks gave them all they could handle before succumbing late. But a nucleus of Michael Carter-Williams, Middleton, Giannis Antetokounmpo and Jabari Parker is an excellent foundation to a future power in the East. The Bucks are going to go away for the summer soon, but they’re not a flash in the pan for future references. They’re going to be a legit threat in what should be a vastly improved Eastern Conference in the next couple years.

2. This is a different Derrick Rose:

A lot has changed in the NBA since that day Derrick Rose went down with his gut-wrenching knee injury in 2012, but somehow he’s expected to be the same, reckless and consciousless player that won the 2011 MVP. Just because he’s missed, in his words, “damn near three years,” it doesn’t mean his interpretation of the game is supposed to retard. Sitting on the sidelines may have thrown off his timing but the way he processes the game has continued its maturation.

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If you’re expecting to see THAT Derrick Rose, you’ll be waiting. But a player who sees the floor better, who utilizes his teammates more and yes, a player who shoots that streaky perimeter jumper more (46 percent 3-point shooter in this series), that’s what Rose is. What he lacks in explosiveness, Rose has gained in basketball IQ. His defense on Michael Carter-Williams was magnificent late in Game 3, and he was often in the scrums retrieving loose balls, helping his big men out before starting his Sonic the Hedgehog fast break. He hasn’t completely lost what made him special from an athletic standpoint; He’s more selective about when to employ his athleticism compared to using his brain, which should be a welcome sight.

3. Rose and Jimmy Butler play off each other better than expected:

Rose and Butler each have the ability to take over stretches of playoff games, which isn’t a surprise. But the way they’ve complemented each other while the other goes on a game-changing run should be noted. In Game 2, Butler tattooed his name on the game late, hitting jumpers and driving to the basket to close the Bucks out. But Rose did his part in feeding Butler and staying aggressive without disrupting Butler’s flow — a fine line to balance.

In Game 3, Butler did the same for Rose, concentrating a lot of energy on defense (note that step-in-front steal to start the second overtime) while also making himself enough of a threat to keep the Bucks from keying solely on Rose. If nothing else, the Bucks’ defensive intensity is great preparation for a Cleveland Cavaliers team that sorely lacks in that category — as Butler and Rose getting to know each other better here can only bode well for down the line.

Paul Zipser says he is unlikely to return to Bulls

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USA TODAY

Paul Zipser says he is unlikely to return to Bulls

Just two years after being drafted in the second round, Paul Zipser told German media that he doesn’t see the Bulls wanting him next season.

The Bulls have until mid-July to pick up Zipser's option.

"I would not be surprised if they no longer want me.” Zipser said in German and translated via Google Translate

“Actually, I'm pretty sure I will not play in Chicago soon.”

Last month, Zipser had surgery on his fractured left foot, in his native country of Germany, which grew speculation the Bulls wouldn’t pick up his player option for next season. Zipser said the surgery "went perfectly."

Zipser showed some flashes of potential in his rookie season, averaging 5.5 per game and 2.8 rebounds in 44 games. But this past season, he played more games, but injuries derailed him from improving his overall production. He finished with four points and 2.4 rebounds in 54 games, including 12 starts.

Zipser explained that things changed from his first year to his second year.

“They were very varied," Zipser said. "The first year was just going very well. I fought my way into the team from the beginning and showed how I can help the team. The Bulls just needed someone like me. That's why it worked so well. We benefited from each other - that's why we were successful.”

“That was very different. It was not right from the beginning, and I was already struggling with my injury. It was not quite clear what it is. If you have pain in your foot, you automatically go down a bit with intensity. You just do not want to hurt yourself and be completely out. It was then difficult for me to keep my head in the sport - I did not manage that well. Nevertheless, the injury should not be an excuse.”

Nothing is official yet, but it sounds like Zipser might not dress up in a Bulls uniform next year.

Former Bulls guard opens up about having depression

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AP

Former Bulls guard opens up about having depression

During his NBA career, he was known as having a joking, outgoing, clown-type of personality. Now, former NBA point guard Nate Robinson opened up about having depression.

Robinson, an 11-year NBA veteran, told Bleacher Report that he began going to therapy sessions in the 2012-13 season when he played for the Bulls.

He said he would struggle with having an angel and a demon inside of him.

"The NBA gave me my depression," Robinson told Bleacher Report. "I've never been a depressed person in my life."

"The hardest thing in my whole life, of my 34 years in existence on earth, was dealing with 11 years in the NBA of trying to be somebody that [NBA coaches] want me to be," Robinson said.

When Robinson was with the Bulls, he said he would sit in front of the plane so he wouldn’t be tempted to crack jokes. His one year with the Bulls ended up being one of the top seasons statistically in his career. He averaged just over 13 points and four assists per game. He played in all 82 games (starting 23) on a team that finished 45-37 with a berth in the Eastern Conference semifinals.

He thought his behavior was always looked down upon, and Robinson thought he was being punished for his actions.

“It’s like Spider-Man, that Venom. I never wanted that Venom outfit to just consume me,” he says. “I wanted to be Spider-Man. I wanted to be positive. I never wanted that dark side to come out because I know what that dark side could do.” 

This might come as a surprise for NBA fans, knowing how energetic Robinson was on the court, no matter what team he was a part of.

Even though Robinson is just 5-foot-9, he brought a spark of energy when he came into the game.

He hasn’t played in the NBA since the 2015-16 season with the Pelicans and spent last year with the Delaware 87ers in the G League.

Robinson is known for his participation in the NBA Slam Dunk competition. He won three contests, going back-to-back in 2009 and 2010.

One highlight was Robinson jumping over Dwight Howard in 2009, which ultimately gave Robinson his third title. Another highlight is welcoming former 1986 Slam Dunk Champion Spud Webb on the floor in 2006 and jumping over him.

Robinson is still vying for a comeback to the NBA.