Bulls

Total domination: Bulls blow out 76ers by 45

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Total domination: Bulls blow out 76ers by 45

Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010
Posted 9:25 PM Updated 11:13 PM

By Chris Cason
CSNChicago.com Contributor

Derrick Rose and Luol Deng both scored 22 points apiece as the Chicago Bulls (17-9) cruised to a 121-76 victory over the Philadelphia 76ers (11-17) Tuesday night.

With second year forward Taj Gibson joining Joakim Noah on the inactive list for precautionary reasons after suffering a concussion in Saturdays game against the Los Angeles Clippers, an emphasis was placed on the importance of starting with intensity and the Bulls answered the bell, dominating on both sides of the floor.

The Bulls jumped on the Sixers 33-19 in the opening frame. Rose, Deng and Carlos Boozer accounted for 29 of those points as the team only trailed in the opening minute.

"I thought we came out, right from the start and had great energy, said head coach Tom Thibodeau. Shots went down for us early. Defensively, I thought we did a really good job with our body position, getting back and challenging shots.

Rose also finished with 12 assists as Chicago led by as many as 51 and were firing on all cylinders, helping shut down a team that had won eight of their last 11 games.

Chicago shot 64 percent and held Philadelphia to 28 of 80 shooting from the field.

I knew the first three minutes of the game, we had no juice, said Sixers coach Doug Collins regarding his team being out of rhythm the entire night. They ran the same play six, or seven straight times. We gauge where we think were going to be in a game by our first ten possessions and they scored eight of their first 10 possessions. I looked at our coaches and said, our guys just arent there tonight.

Chicago outscored Philadelphia 52-26 in the paint - thanks in large part to Kurt Thomas holding Elton Brand to six points on 2 of 9 shooting. They also had a 28-9 edge in fast break points, assisted 32 times on their 49 made field goals and scored 31 points off of Sixers turnovers. There was no lack of intensity in this one and leading 92-54, the Bulls were able to rest all of their starters in the fourth.

I just thought we just did a great job of getting ready to play, said Boozer, who finished with 16 points and 11 rebounds. "We were disappointed how we started last game. Its been a point of emphasis the last couple of days of practice. We came out tonight focused and did a great job of being ready offensively and defensively.

We helped each other a lot, continued Boozer. We dominated the boards, shared the ball a lot, and were efficient inside. We just did a great job of being prepared for this game.

Filling in for Gibson, 16-year veteran Thomas got the starting nod and finished with 12 points, eight rebounds and five blocked shots.

Hes been doing it for 100 years, joked Thibodeau about Thomas performance. Hes a smart player, plays great body position defense, great communicator I thought he helped our pick and roll defense tremendously.

In a game with so much exerted energy on both ends, the 38-year old - who has more miles on his body than the entire roster combined - appreciated the game for obvious reasons.

Its best when you have a back to back, that youre able to get some rest, said Thomas. Your main guys are able to get some rest, so thats always good.

The Bulls will play the Washington Wizards on Wednesday night. It will be the second time the two teams have met this season, with Chicago taking the first game a 103-96 win on Nov. 13.

It will be their first bout with the slightly new-look Wizards, who traded away long-time franchise cornerstone Gilbert Arenas to the Orlando Magic for Rashard Lewis on Sunday.
NOTES

Taj Gibson told CSNChicago.com that he feels great and would be ready to play on Wednesday, but the decision will determined by the Bulls team doctors.

Thumb injury leaves Wendell Carter Jr. on the outside looking in at NBA All-Rookie teams

Thumb injury leaves Wendell Carter Jr. on the outside looking in at NBA All-Rookie teams

Wendell Carter Jr. was on his way to becoming the second consecutive Bulls player to make an All-Rookie Team, but a thumb injury that required surgery in January ultimately proved to be the deciding factor in his omission.

The All-Rookie Teams were announced on Tuesday afternoon and, as expected, Carter was not on either. The seventh overall pick had a promising rookie campaign in which he averaged 10.3 points, 7.0 rebounds and 1.3 blocks per game. Those marks ranked 10th, 4th and 2nd, respectively, among first-year players.

But Carter's thumb injury limited him to just 44 games. Of the 10 players who made the first and second teams, Memphis' Jaren Jackson Jr. played the fewest games (58) while the group averaged 72.8 games played.

Carter's thumb injury was initially diagnosed as a jam, but further testing revealed that surgery was the best course of action for the then-19-year-old (he turned 20 in April). The Bulls opted not to rush Carter back at the end of the season - a wise decision on multiple levels - and Carter, when he spoke with media members for the first time after undergoing surgery, said his goals had moved to the long-term.

“So many people have had this injury and they don’t get it taken care of and bones are coming out of their socket very easily,” Carter said. “I just wanted to eliminate all that. If I was to get in a cast and come back and the tendon didn’t come back out, then I’d have to wait another eight weeks and get the surgery. So I just went ahead and knocked it out to get it out of the way.

"It's all good. I'm just looking at the long-term now."

He was one of the league's youngest rookies but hardly played like it. He moved into the starting lineup for good just a few days into the preseason and wore multiple hats for the Bulls. Injuries to Kris Dunn, Bobby Portis and Denzel Valentine thrust Carter into a significant scoring role for the Bulls, sometimes acting as the No. 2 option behind Zach LaVine early in the season.

He took on more of a traditional post-up role - with solid footwork making him a serviceable roll man - when those players returned and Jim Boylen took over, slowing down the offense. He shot a respectable 48.5% from the field and his 79.5% mark from the foul line showed a nice touch. But he also went 6 of 32 from beyond the arc in his rookie season. He'll need to find some more versatility on the offensive end, though there will be more floor spacing in his sophomore season after the Bulls added Otto Porter Jr. at the trade deadline.

He is one of five rookies over the last seven seasons to average at least 7 rebounds and 1.3 blocks per game, joining Andre Drummond, Anthony Davis, Nerlens Noel, Kristaps Porzingis, Karl-Anthony Towns and Joel Embiid in that category. That's not to suggest that Carter will have the same career arc as those All-Stars plus Noel - he's got plenty to do on the defensive end - but in Carter the Bulls have found a defensive anchor and someone to complement Lauri Markkanen on that end of the floor.

He's a raw talent who showed promise as a rookie. And while it didn't result in an All-Rookie bid, the future is bright in the middle for the Bulls. Like many of his teammates, expectations will increase for Carter as they enter Year 3 of their rebuild.

Check out the All-Rookie Teams below.

So you want the Bulls to trade up in the NBA Draft? Here's what it costs

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AP

So you want the Bulls to trade up in the NBA Draft? Here's what it costs

NBA Draft capital is incredibly expensive these days.

It's never been cheap, but the price of moving up continues to cost teams a pretty penny without a surefire promise of return on their investment. This proves to be incredibly risky when considering trading in the top 5.

One year ago the Dallas Mavericks, who were picking fifth, wanted Slovenian point guard Luka Doncic. Knowing the Atlanta Hawks were eyeing a point guard, they put together a package that included the No. 5 pick and a top-5 protected first round pick the following season in order to move up two spots. It was a steep price, as the Mavericks wound up with the No. 10 pick in the 2019 NBA Draft that will convey to Atlanta.

Consider two seasons ago, when the Philadelphia 76ers traded the No. 3 pick and the Kings' 2019 first-round pick to move up to No. 1. That Sacramento pick wound up being the No. 14 selection thanks to the Kings' surprise season out West, but at the time it was an incredibly valuable asset that many thought would yield a top-10 pick. The Sixers drafted Markelle Fultz while the Celtics drafted Jayson Tatum. Two years later, Tatum looks like a budding star while the Sixers traded Fultz and his bag of issues to the Magic in February.

In 2009, the Timberwolves traded two key rotation pieces to the Wizards for the No. 5 pick. In hindsight, trading Randy Foye and Mike Miller for a top-5 selection doesn't seem like a lot. But consider that Foye was a 25-year-old coming off a 16.3-point season, while Miller was a 28-year-old with a career mark of 40.1% from beyond the arc and averages of 13.9 points, 5.0 rebounds and 3.2 assists to his name. The price to move up to No. 5 and draft Ricky Rubio - which they did a day later - was steep.

In 2005, the Utah Jazz held the sixth pick in the draft but desperately wanted to move up to get Illinois point guard Deron Williams. On draft night, they sent the No. 6 pick, the No. 27 pick and a future first round pick (Detroit's in 2006, which wound up being No. 30) to move up three spots to No. 3. They were able to grab Williams, and the rest is history.

So if we take out the 2009 trade that didn't include any picks, here's the history of trades involving top 5 picks:

Get: No. 3 overall
Give: No. 5 overall, No. 10 overall the following season

Get: No. 1 overall
Give: No. 3 overall, No. 14 overall the following season

Get: No. 3 overall
Give: No. 6 overall, No. 27 overall, No. 30 the following season

It's not cheap. And as we can see, the cost to move up is getting pricier. The 2019 NBA Draft won't be any different. We know that picks Nos. 1 and 2 are off the table. The New Orleans Pelicans will select Duke's Zion Williamson and the Memphis Grizzlies will follow a few minutes later by taking Murray State point guard Ja Morant. It's also pretty safe to say that the New York Knicks will draft Duke's R.J. Barrett with the third pick.

It gets pretty fuzzy after that. Picks 4-14 are all pretty much in the same tier, to the point that including assets to move up in a class that will be a major dice roll would be tough to justify. Then again, maybe the price to move up to No. 4 or 5 isn't as substantial because there isn't a sure fire player the other team would be giving up by moving back in the first round. In 2005, it was obvious the Jazz were going hard after Williams or Wake Forest's Chris Paul. The Sixers wanted to move up to No. 1 to get Markelle Fultz, who as funny as it seems now, was the consensus top pick. And the Mavericks were clearly eyeing Luka Doncic after the Kings passed on him for Duke's Marvin Bagley.

This time around? It's tough to say. The Bulls need a point guard in the worst way and Vanderbilt's Darius Garland will likely be gone before the Bulls pick at No. 7. It'd behoove the Bulls to jump in front of Phoenix at No. 6; the Suns have similar needs to the Bulls and are in similar situations as far as their respective rebuild goes. But the Bulls aren't once piece away from contending, and none of the players they would go target at No. 4 or 5 would really move the needle next season. That's critical, because they'd almost certainly be including next year's first-round pick in any deal (let's be real and say Kris Dunn's trade value is essentially zilch). If the Bulls were to attach even a heavily protected first round pick, they'd need to be certain they were going to have on-court improvement in the coming years. This is still a team that won 22 games a season ago.

It's too early in the pre-draft process to consider which teams may move back, and who teams trying to move up would want to target. That will happen in the coming weeks. For now, just realize that moving up in the draft costs a whole lot, and you'd better hit on the pick if you're going to give up assets during a rebuild.