Cubs

Aroldis Chapman unhappy with how Joe Maddon utilized him in World Series

Aroldis Chapman unhappy with how Joe Maddon utilized him in World Series

Aroldis Chapman may have signed with the Yankees but he still found a way to spurn Chicago with another introductory press conference.

After Chapman crashed and burned with the media and many corners of the fanbase in his "Welcome to Chicago" moment last summer, he helped turn things around by firing triple-digit fastballs all the way to the Cubs' first championship in 108 years.

Now, after inking the largest deal for a closer in baseball history, Chapman was asked about the way Cubs manager Joe Maddon used him during that World Series run.

"Personally, I don't agree with the way he used me," Chapman told New York media Friday. "But he is the manager."

Chapman also reportedly cited Game 6 in specific, when he threw 20 pitches across 1.1 innings despite the Cubs holding a big lead in a game they eventually won 9-3.

Chapman saw a drop in velocity over the 35 pitches he threw in Game 7, struggling to hit 100 mph while blowing the save and giving up a game-tying home run to light-hitting Rajai Davis.

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The big southpaw also threw 42 pitches in Game 5 at Wrigley Field to get the final eight outs and only had one day of rest in between that contest and the final two games of the World Series.

Chapman always wanted to stick to working just one inning — the ninth — and was not a fan of being used to get four- or five-out saves. But he was flexible to changing that mindset in the World Series, particularly those last three win-or-go-home games.

Maddon has come under fire for some of those calls in the weeks since the Cubs won it all, but he insists he made the right decisions.

The Cubs manager talked to CSN's Ryan McGuffey this week about his usage of Chapman:

"That's why he was acquired. Yeah, in the regular season he was not used to that (multiple innings), he didn't want to do it, but we had that conversation and when we had that conversation it was probably going to change. ...

"It was going to change in the postseason, and he was on board with the whole thought. These are conversations you have in advance and again, he was there for that reason. He was fine. When people dissect the situation and it doesn't go your way, a lot of times people think either the player wasn't good or he had done something wrong. No, the other team is good, too."

For his part, Chapman admitted he was not about to tell Maddon he was too fatigued to pitch in Game 7.

"The way I feel, as baseball players, we're warriors," he said. "Our job is to be ready to do what we need to do on the field. They send me out there to pitch, I'm going to go out there and pitch. If I'm healthy, I'm going to go out there and pitch. If I'm tired, I'm going to put that aside and just get through it. 

"It is kind of like a warrior; they send you somewhere and you have to go there and your mentality is you have to go there and do your job."

When Maddon is asked about this next time he gives a press conference, he should just hold up the World Series trophy and walk out:

Reds pitcher Amir Garrett apparently held a grudge against Javy Baez for a year

Reds pitcher Amir Garrett apparently held a grudge against Javy Baez for a year

Baseball players don't forget grudges. Javy Baez and Reds pitcher Amir Garrett gave an example of that on Saturday.

Garrett struck out Baez in the seventh inning of the first game of the Cubs-Reds doubleheader. Garrett showed some excitement with the strikeout and then said something to Baez. They both started jawing at each other and suddenly the benches cleared.

At first glance, it looked like Garrett was a bit too excited to get a strikeout with no one on base. Turns out Baez had his own bit of swag for Garrett last year (Friday was the one-year anniversary) in the form of a grand slam at Wrigley Field.

This time Garrett got Baez and wanted to even things up a bit.

Things didn't get too feisty despite the benches clearing, but Anthony Rizzo did rush to Baez's side at some speed. This could be a matchup to keep an eye out for in the future.

Cubs Talk Podcast: The greatest Cubs moments at Great American Ballpark

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USA TODAY

Cubs Talk Podcast: The greatest Cubs moments at Great American Ballpark

Siera Santos, Kelly Crull, and David DeJesus go into the audio archives to break down the biggest games for the Cubs in Cincinnati.

David DeJesus gives us his top 3 ballgames with such gems as The Schwarber Game, The Kris Bryant Game, Starlin Castro’s debut, and Jake Arrieta’s second no hitter.

Listen to the full Cubs Talk Podcast right here: