Cubs

Coleman, Cubs need offensive support vs. Brewers

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Coleman, Cubs need offensive support vs. Brewers

Sunday, April 10, 2011
Posted: 10:53 a.m.

Associated Press

Yovani Gallardo has not wasted any time building on his solid 2010 season.

The Milwaukee right-hander has a good chance to continue his success overall and against the Chicago Cubs on Sunday at Miller Park.

Gallardo (1-0, 1.20 ERA) won a career-high 14 games and made his first All-Star team last season. That effort also got him a contract extension that has not hindered his performance through two 2011 starts.

After allowing two runs in six innings of a 7-6 opening-day loss at Cincinnati, Gallardo recorded his fourth complete game when he allowed two hits and scored in a 1-0 win over Atlanta on Tuesday.

"I'm amazed," first-year Milwaukee manager Ron Roenicke said. "Knowing when to throw offspeed pitches, knowing when to elevate in the zone, he's got a great feel for it, a great athlete. He's going to help himself win other ball games with the bat and with his fielding.

"He's a special guy."

The Cubs (4-4) know that first hand.

Gallardo is 3-1 with a 3.19 ERA in seven starts versus Chicago, including 2-0 with an 0.95 ERA in three at Miller Park. He allowed eight hits over 14 scoreless innings in two home starts against the Cubs in 2010.

Milwaukee (4-5) gave starter Chris Narveson more than enough support in Saturday's 6-0 win to even the series. Prince Fielder had a career-high three doubles with four RBIs and Ryan Braun added two hits as the Brewers won for the fourth time in five games since starting 0-4.

Fielder started the season 3 for 17 without driving in a run the first five games, but is 8 for 14 with a homer and nine RBIs the last four.

"It's always good having a guy like Braun in front of you because he can go deep, get base hits and steal bases," Fielder said.

Braun is batting .367 with six RBIs this season, and is 4 for 5 against scheduled starter Casey Coleman.

With Randy Wells on the disabled list because of a forearm strain, Coleman will make his 2011 debut after going 4-2 with a 3.33 ERA in eight starts for the Cubs last season.

The right-hander was one of the last players sent to the minors in spring training.

"I understood I needed to go down and get work in and get back up here soon," Coleman told the Cubs' official website. "It stinks the reason I'm up here."

Coleman allowed a run and five hits in six innings of a 2-0 road loss in his only previous start against the Brewers on Sept. 12.

His teammates will need to find a way to break out of their road funk against Gallardo and provide some support after recording six hits while being shut out for the first time in 2011.

Shortstop Starlin Castro is 4 for 9 with three doubles against Gallardo, and batting .353 this season. He's hitting .348 in 11 games versus Milwaukee.

Chicago's biggest offseason acquisition, slugger Carlos Pena, has struck out five times in the series and is batting .222 without a homer for his new club.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Cubs bench coach Mark Loretta reportedly interviews for Padres' manager job

Cubs bench coach Mark Loretta reportedly interviews for Padres' manager job

While David Ross is set to become the Cubs' next manager, a member of the team's 2019 coaching staff has reportedly interviewed for a managerial vacancy elsewhere.

Cubs bench coach Mark Loretta recently interviewed for the Padres' managerial opening, according to MLB Network's Jon Heyman. It's the second known managerial opening Loretta has interviewed for this offseason, as he also interviewed for the Cubs' before they chose Ross.

Like Ross and the Cubs, Loretta has several ties to the Padres. The 48-year-old played three seasons with San Diego (2003-05) during his 15-year big-league career. He also spent nine seasons as a special assistant in the Padres front office, working with general manager Jed Hoyer — who held the same position with the Padres from 2010-11.

Loretta isn't the only Cubs coach to interview for a managerial opening. First base coach Will Venable — who also was a candidate to replace Joe Maddon — reportedly interviewed for the Giants' vacancy last Friday. The 36-year-old joined the Cubs as a front office assistant in 2017 before being named first base coach in 2018.

What this means for Ross' coaching staff is to be determined. Loretta and Venable interviewing elsewhere doesn't mean they'll get hired, but Epstein and Co. handpicked them for Maddon's staff.

Thus, Ross may look to choose his own group as he embarks on year No. 1 as a big-league manager. Loretta and Venable could also seek seek other opportunities, though the latter told the Chicago Sun-Times that his interest is in the Cubs "organization in general."

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How will Cubs players respond to David Ross as manager?

How will Cubs players respond to David Ross as manager?

David Ross is officially moving from "Grandpa Rossy" to "Manager Rossy."

The affable former backup catcher is not only a fan favorite, but he's immensely popular inside the Cubs clubhouse among the core group of players. 

However, that popularity has always come in a different form, as he now enters into a new dynamic as Cubs manager. Ross was first a teammate, then transitioned into a front office role with the organization, which included a vital role in recruiting Craig Kimbrel to Chicago.

Now that Ross has been tabbed as Joe Maddon's heir, how will his relationship with the players change?

The Cubs announced Maddon's departure on the final day of the regular season and in turn, immediately stoked the fires of the Ross-as-manager rumors. Players were asked how they'd feel if their former teammate became their boss, including Jon Lester, who was instrumental in bringing Ross to Chicago before 2015 as his personal catcher.

"I think that's something that you'd just have to learn as you go," Lester said. "I would like to think that [former Red Sox manager Tito Francona] was a good friend of mine, but still my manager when it came down to it. 

"Obviously the dynamic's different — I didn't play with Tito and that sort of thing, but when it came down to it, that's my boss. If he makes a decision, he makes a decision and you have to respect that."

Anthony Rizzo and Ross formed an immediate bond in 2015 and have grown very close over the last five years.

"If it's Rossy, we would obviously sit down," Rizzo said on the final day of the season. "I've talked to him about it before. He's in a really good place right now at home with his family and what he's doing and he's happy. He's my biggest mentor in the game player-wise, really, behind Joe [Maddon] and [former Cubs coach Eric] Hinske. Can it work? Yes."

Back in August, on the five-year anniversary of his MLB debut, Javy Baez crushed two homers in a Cubs win and after the game, shouted out Ross unprompted. Baez credited his former teammate for helping him understand how to keep things simple and just his natural abilities take over while allowing the game to teach him.

So it's no surprise Baez said in September he would be stoked if Ross were named manager.

"We all love David and he knows the team and the organization," Baez said.

In reality, it will be difficult to transition from teammate and mentor to boss. Maddon found a way to be both mentor and friend to this group of Cubs players, but he obviously never played with any of them and he came to Chicago with an already impressive resume as a manager and coach.

Ross doesn't have that same experience to fall back on, but the Cubs are confident he's up to the challenge because when it boils down it, so much of the job is based off communication. 

What Ross has working in his favor that the other managerial candidates like Joe Espada lacked was an immediate rapport with the front office and the core guys in the clubhouse. There's already a built-in level of trust between him and Rizzo, Baez, Lester, Kris Bryant, Jason Heyward and a host of others — including Kimbrel (the two were teammates in Atlanta). The guys he hasn't played with have at least seen him around Wrigley Field or the spring training complex in his front office role the last three years.

That preexisting relationship will be a huge advantage immediately, as it eliminates the time another candidate would've needed to earn the trust of the players on the roster. Plus, the relationship between Ross and Epstein's front office is already so far advanced for a first-year manager that there's an instant level of understanding and rapport before he's even officially introduced into the role.

During his time in the clubhouse, Ross was known to be direct and honest, holding his teammates accountable and helping the young players realize their potential without crushing their spirits. That's not an easy task for a backup catcher in the twilight of his career to accomplish.

Still, the Cubs' choice to go with Ross seemed at least somewhat contradictory when presented against the backdrop of change Theo Epstein emphasized in his end-of-season press conference. The Cubs president talked at length about the organization's need to stop looking back at 2016 and avoiding the "winner's trap" of sticking with things that worked years ago but might not be the best avenues to success today.

In that same presser, Epstein also insisted Ross' connection to the players left over from the World Series championship team was not the main reason they were considering the former catcher as manager. 

"His connection to the players on this team and especially his connection to the 2016 team are not necessarily things that are going to be important to us," Epstein said. "...It's not necessarily a detriment, either, as long as you trust the person to handle it the right way and trust the players to handle it the right way. It's something you have to consider.

"I'm just saying, what we're looking for is someone who's a great manager for the Cubs moving forward. Certainly not looking backwards and not with undue emphasis on a couple players there might be a personal [connection]. That's not a major factor for us." 

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