Cubs

Cubs activate Hector Rondon as playoff bullpen begins to take shape

Cubs activate Hector Rondon as playoff bullpen begins to take shape

MILWAUKEE — For the Cubs and Hector Rondon, September will be all about staying healthy and getting ready for October, when they believe their bullpen will be able to match up with anyone.

The Cubs activated Rondon before Tuesday night’s 12-5 loss to the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park, adding a one-time 30-save closer to help set up for Aroldis Chapman.

“I feel really good — I’m healthy right now,” said Rondon, who had been on the disabled list with a strained right triceps since Aug. 17 and allowed one run on two hits in the seventh inning Tuesday. “I feel a little stronger, too, so I’m ready to go.”

Manager Joe Maddon said Rondon wouldn’t necessarily slide back into a specific eighth-inning role or only high-leverage situations. With a 15 1/2-game lead over the St. Louis Cardinals in the division, the Cubs have the luxury of keeping Rondon on a schedule, resting Chapman in certain save situations and not pushing Carl Edwards Jr. too hard during his rookie season.

Assuming Rondon (18 saves, 2.47 ERA) returns at full strength and Pedro Strop (21 holds, 2.89 ERA) recovers from a torn meniscus in his left knee and a strained right groin, the Cubs will have multiple options in front of Chapman, one of the game’s most intimidating closers with his 105-mph fastball.

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Right-handers Edwards and Justin Grimm would also appear to be locks for the playoff bullpen, with veteran Joe Smith on the bubble trying to bring the funk that’s allowed him to carve out a 10-year career in the big leagues.

Assuming the Cubs construct an 11-man pitching staff in a best-of-five series, Jason Hammel could be on the outside looking in during that round. The Cubs have left-handed (Mike Montgomery, Travis Wood, Rob Zastryzny) and right-handed (Trevor Cahill) swingmen who can throw multiple innings.

“It depends on how many you want to keep,” Maddon said. “You may actually end up with less pitchers and more (position) players in a shorter series. It’s possible.

“When you get to that point, I think you really have to consider who you’re playing and what the composition of that team looks like and all the matchups (that could) occur. We’ll have a lot of difficult decisions to make based on the versatility and how good a lot of our guys are. (But) you got plenty of time to worry about stuff like that. (And) I’m not worried about it.”

Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts: 'We’d definitely like to see baseball back'

Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts: 'We’d definitely like to see baseball back'

Should MLB and the players union come to terms on a 2020 season, clubs will suffer revenues losses due to the expected lack of fans at most or all games. But if it comes down to playing or not, Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts prefers the former.

Ricketts said Tuesday the organization "definitely" would rather play an abbreviated 2020 season despite reports suggesting clubs could lose more money under the March agreement to pay players prorated salaries than not playing at all.

"We’ll have to see how it goes but we’d definitely like to see baseball back," Ricketts said on CNBC's 'The Exchange.' "We’d like to see the team back on the field. I know the players want to play, I know the manager wants to manage and I know even if it’s on television only, I think people want to see baseball back."

MORE: Why Cubs, MLB might face 2020 season without key players and what it means

Major League Baseball is meeting with the union on Tuesday to propose financial terms for the 2020 season. NBC Sports Chicago reported Saturday that proposal is expected to be a compromise from the potential 50-50 revenue split previously reported. 

According to MLB insider Jon Heyman, that proposal includes paying players a portion of their prorated salaries, and those with higher salaries would take the biggest pay cuts.

Ricketts suggested in a best-case scenario, the Cubs might make 20 percent of their usual revenues, which appears tied to the one-time startup cost for the club's TV network, Wrigley Field construction costs and buying surrounding buildings in Wrigleyville. Those numbers are disputed by some, however, as owners don't open their books.

MLB's proposal for the season entails a second 'spring' training starting in mid-June, with Opening Day coming around the Fourth of July. Ricketts said the latter isn't out of the question. However, those dates are contingent on the league and union reaching an agreement in the near future.

"It really comes down to how quickly and efficiently the league and the union can get together and hack through the issues," he said.

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Former Cubs pitcher Dan Straily, now in KBO, details games without fans

Former Cubs pitcher Dan Straily, now in KBO, details games without fans

Cubs fans may remember Dan Straily. The right-hander pitched for the club in 2014, making seven appearances (one start) before getting dealt to the Houston Astros the ensuing offseason in the Dexter Fowler trade.

Straily now pitches for the Lotte Giants in the KBO, South Korea's highest level of pro ball. The league kicked its season off earlier this month without fans in attendance, a model MLB will likely follow for most (if not all) of its potential 2020 season.

Jon Frankel, a correspondent for HBO's "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel," recently interviewed current and former KBO players about the league's return during the coronavirus pandemic. In an excerpt made available via press release, Frankel asked Straily if he misses playing in front of a crowd.

MORE: Why one medical expert remains skeptical of MLB's COVID-19 precautions

"Of course. Like, even if you're on the road, and people are just telling you how much you suck — you thrive off it," Straily said. "You feed off that energy.”

Crowd noise obviously plays a big part in an athlete's adrenaline. Not having that factor will be an adjustment for MLB in 2020, and Straily took things a step further regarding the circumstances players face without fans in attendance.

“My shortstop dove for a ball. And he missed it by, like, an inch," he said. "Like, it was an incredible effort. When he hit the ground, I heard the air leave his lungs. And we've talked about that in the dugout. Because I've never once in my life heard that.”

Not having crowds to drown out on-field noise could make for a unique viewing experience for fans at home. UFC returned on May 9, and many punches and kicks were audible on ESPN's TV broadcast.

MLB teams could play proxy crowd noise in games, but nevertheless, fans may pickup noises on their TVs previously unavailable from home.

The full episode will air Tuesday at 9 p.m. CT on HBO.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of the Chicago Cubs easily on your device.