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Cubs bet their future on Rizzo, deal Cashner to Padres

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Cubs bet their future on Rizzo, deal Cashner to Padres

Kerry Wood once waved off the comparisons to Andrew Cashner, another Texan who could go 100 mph, by telling the media: Dont do that to him.

Anthony Rizzo was supposed to replace Adrian Gonzalez in San Diego. Now hell be the first baseman the Cubs targeted instead of Prince Fielder.

Its never quite that simple, and probably unfair to the centerpieces in Fridays four-player trade between the Cubs and Padres. But as Cashner was saying over the phone on Friday night: Everything happens for a reason.

The Cubs dropped so many hints they werent going to be handing out a megadeal this winter. Theo Epsteins plan is to collect as many young players as possible, and the rebuilding process will take years.

One year ago, the marketing machine had Cashner, Tyler Colvin and Starlin Castro as the Cubs of the future. Colvin like Cashner, a former first-round pick has already been traded to the Rockies. Castros camp was responding to Fridays reports about an alleged sexual assault.

Back home in Texas, Cashner had finished his workout when he was surprised by a phone call from assistant general manager Randy Bush. Cashner and minor-league outfielder Kyung-Min Na were traded to San Diego for Rizzo and another prospect, right-hander Zach Cates.

The Cubs will always be in my heart, Cashner said. Things would be different had I not gotten hurt last year, but I cant control that. Its a business.

A rotator cuff strain wiped out almost all of Cashners 2011 season, though he says hes now 100 percent. The Cubs projected him as a power arm out of the bullpen not a frontline starter and were willing to trade that piece for a potential left-handed run producer in Rizzo.

While the new administration wasnt as attached to Cashner, Cubs executives are in love with the 22-year-old Rizzo, a sixth-round pick by the Red Sox in the 2007 draft.

Back then scouting guru Jason McLeod and general manager Jed Hoyer worked for Epstein in Boston. They moved on to San Diego and brought over Rizzo in the Gonzalez deal 13 months ago.

Rizzo was diagnosed with Hodgkins lymphoma in 2008 and beat that while developing into one of the games top prospects.

Overcoming cancer was incredibly impressive, Hoyer said, but I think its a mistake if you just allude to his makeup (that way). Hes a very strong person. Hes a leader and hes someone (who can) help put our team on the right path as far as our culture.

It sounds like that wont come by Opening Day 2012. Hoyer expects Rizzo to begin the year at Triple-A Iowa, which right now would make Bryan LaHair your first baseman.

Rizzo began the 2011 season by hitting .365 with 16 homers and 63 RBI in his first 52 Triple-A games to earn the promotion. In 128 at-bats in the big leagues last season, he hit .141 with 46 strikeouts.

To be candid, I dont think I did Anthony any favors when I was GM of the Padres, Hoyer said. We called him up because we werent getting any first-base production in San Diego and it was too early and it was a mistake on my part.

Rizzo became expendable when the Padres acquired Yonder Alonso from Cincinnati in the Mat Latos deal last month. He will be given every opportunity in Chicago, along with Ian Stewart, Travis Wood and Chris Volstad. Well see if Cubs fans have the patience for this.

Theres no doubt that with young talent comes an adjustment period, Hoyer said. The best players get through (it) and they take off. (Once they) get past that, they can really explode. Young players (have) growing pains, theres no question about that. (But) thats something were prepared to deal with.

The only way to be a really great organization is to be willing to go through (it) to get the reward at the end of that tunnel.

Jake Arrieta full of appreciation in return to Wrigley mound: ‘I’ll never forget this city’

Jake Arrieta full of appreciation in return to Wrigley mound: ‘I’ll never forget this city’

The last time Jake Arrieta pitched at Wrigley Field, his night ended with Cubs fans giving him a rousing standing ovation. The former Cubs right hander tossed 6 2/3 innings of one-run ball, leading the Cubs to victory in Game 4 of the 2017 NLCS—their only win against the Los Angeles Dodgers that series.

Arrieta returned to Wrigley Field as a visitor on Monday night, making his first start against the Cubs since joining the Philadelphia Phillies last season. Ironically, Arrieta’s counterpart for the night was Yu Darvish, who ultimately replaced Arrieta in the Cubs starting rotation.

Despite now donning Phillies red, Cubs fans once again showed their love for Arrieta, giving him a lengthy standing ovation ahead of his first plate appearance. Darvish even stepped off the mound in respect for the moment.

“I loved it, absolutely loved it,” Cubs manager Joe Maddon said to reporters postgame. “[I’m] very happy that our fans would acknowledge him like that. Yu stepped away from the mound nicely. Jake deserved it.”

Arrieta tipped his helmet in appreciation for the crowd, taking in the moment for more than 30 seconds before stepping into the batter’s box. After the game, he told reporters that moment brought back memories of his time with the Cubs.

“That was something that really brought back great memories of getting that same sort of ovation pretty much on a nightly basis,” Arrieta said. “[I’m] very appreciative of that. I can’t say thank you enough to the city of Chicago, I really can’t.”

Arrieta took fans back to his Cubs tenure on Monday, throwing six innings of one run ball in the Phillies’ 5-4 10-inning win. Although the 33-year-old didn’t pick up the victory, he matched Darvish—who threw six innings of three-run ball—pitch by-pitch.

Phillies manager Gabe Kapler noted how well Arrieta handled his emotions throughout the night.

“I thought he handled the emotions really well. I thought he was in control of the game even when we were down,” Kapler said to reporters. “He always maintained his poise and he just got stronger as the outing went on and that’s why we were able to have him take down the sixth inning for us.”

It’s well-documented how Arrieta’s career improved for the better after the Cubs acquired him in a trade with the Baltimore Orioles in July 2013. When the Cubs acquired him, Arrieta held a career 5.46 ERA in 69 games (63 starts). He finished his Cubs career with a 2.73 ERA in 128 regular season starts. He also won five postseason games with the Cubs, including Games 2 and 6 of the 2016 World Series.

Despite moving on in free agency, Arrieta spoke highly of his time with the Cubs, their fans and the city of Chicago.

“Cubs fans all across the country, all across the world, they really respect and appreciate what guys are able to do here for them,” he said. “It means a lot, it really does.

"I’ll never forget this city, the fan base, the organization, everything that they did for me. It was 4 1/2 incredible years of my career.”

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Yu Darvish crashed Jake Arrieta's party, but Cubs bullpen falters

Yu Darvish crashed Jake Arrieta's party, but Cubs bullpen falters

Yu Darvish was one pitch away.

Holding onto a 1-0 lead with two outs in the sixth inning, Darvish threw Phillies catcher JT Realmuto a 2-2 cutter. It made sense - Darvish had been spotting that pitch well all night, and the Phillies were averaging a paltry 79.8 mph exit velocity against it.

With one strike standing between Darvish and a 6-inning shutout, Realmuto took Darvish’s cutter and sent it back up the middle for a game-tying RBI single. A 2-RBI triple from César Hernández followed. In the blink of an eye, what was shaping up to be one of Darvish’s finest moments in Chicago was instead reduced to yet another start spent searching for silver linings.

“Really good. He was outstanding tonight,” Joe Maddon said. “He pitched really well.

“He had really good stuff. He had command of his stuff, he had command of himself. I thought he was outstanding - even better than what he looked like in Cincinnati. I thought that was probably his best game for us to date.”

Darvish has continued to lean heavily on his cutter this season, more so than any year prior. After throwing it 13 percent of the time last season, he’s going to that pitch almost 25 percent of the time now. If that holds, it’d beat his previous career-high, set in 2013, by six percentage points.

All things considered, that pitch has actually been good for him this season. It’s his go-to offering when he needs to induce weak contact, and batters are hitting .125 against it so far. He gets batters to chase cutters 29.5 percent of the time, the most of any pitch he throws. While he has admitted in games past that he relies too heavily on his fastball, Maddon sees no issues with the new trend.

“I have no concerns with that whatsoever,” he said. “There’s different ways for pitchers to attack hitters, and if it's successful, I really would not change a whole lot.”

Though the night was dedicated to celebrating one of the franchises most beloved pitchers, it was one of their most maligned that continued to show signs of figuring it out. He’s put together back-to-back starts with three or less walks for the first time this season, and has allowed two or less runs in three of the last five.

The pitcher even stepped off the mound during Arrieta’s first at-bat, in order to let the standing ovation continue on.

“He’s is a legend in Chicago,” Darvish said after the game. “And I pitched against him and pitched pretty good, so it makes me confident.”

The bullpen again struggled on Monday night, as the trio of Mike Montgomery, Brad Brach, and Kyle Ryan allowed two runs on five hits, including the game-winning solo home run from Realmuto in the 10th. For a moment it looked like the Cubs had a win wrapped up when Brach got outfielder Andrew McCutchen to bite on a two-strike slider, but was (probably incorrectly) called a checked swing.  He would eventually draw a walk, leading to Jean Segura’s game-tying single.

“On the field, I thought for sure [that McCutchen swung],” Brach said. “Looking at the first base umpire, I was a little taken aback. That’s why I went off the mound - just to regather myself, because I didn’t want to let the emotion get to me there.

“It’s a 50-50 call, and unfortunately it didn’t go my way.”

 

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