Cubs

Cubs' Bowden enjoying the ride

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Cubs' Bowden enjoying the ride

This time last year, Michael Bowden was gearing up for a season with the Boston Red Sox, hoping to stick on the big-league roster after spring training.

Now, Bowden's days are filled with charity events and a Cubs Caravan tour around the suburbs in which he was raised.

"It's unbelievable," said Bowden, who grew up as a Cubs fan in Aurora. "I was traded last April. Out of chance, I was dealt to the Cubs...It was a dream come true. I couldn't have scripted it any better.

"Hopefully I help the team win and I'm here for a long time. I'm really enjoying this all. It's awesome."

The 26-year-old pitcher joined Cubs players and staff -- including Gold Glove-winning second baseman Darwin Barney and manager Dale Sveum -- in a visit to promote health and wellness to the students Thursday morning at Fox Chase Elementary School in Oswego, where Bowden currently makes his home.

"You go there, you see them all and they're all decked out in Cubs gear. They're impressed that you're there," Bowden said of his visit to Fox Chase. "It's fun to be able to have that kind of effect on kids when you go to places like that.

"To be able to give back to the community that I'm actually living in is really, really cool."

Bowden starred at Waubonsie Valley High School in Aurora before the Red Sox drafted him with the 47th pick in the 2005 MLB Draft. He came over to the Cubs in the Marlon Byrd deal last spring and immediately joined the Chicago bullpen.

The 6-foot-3 righty got off to a tough start in his Cubs career, surrendering eight runs in 9.2 innings between April and May. The Cubs sent him down to Triple-A Iowa, where he made 23 relief appearances.

Bowden was recalled in mid-August and posted a 1.33 ERA the rest of the way, including 11 straight scoreless appearances to end the 2012 season.

He enters spring training this year hoping to snag a bullpen spot in the majors, but still remembers where he comes from. The hometown kid had friends and family come out to Wrigley Field all last year, and anticipates much of the same this season.

"It's not overwhelming," Bowden said. "During BP and stuff, I'll have old friends and stuff hollering at me from the stands. It's nice because usually during the season, I leave in February and I don't get home until October.

"Now, I'm around friends and family throughout the course of the season. It's good to be around them and see them. It's a different lifestyle than I've been accoustmed to the last seven years."

Bowden said he's even run into some old opponents from his high school days at Wrigley Field.

"I had a couple guys last year tell me how they hit homers off me. And I don't recall that at all," he deadpanned. "A lot of people come out to the game. It's cool to catch up with some guys and see how we know each other or have run across each other in the past."

ESPN to broadcast two of Cubs first four games in 2020

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AP

ESPN to broadcast two of Cubs first four games in 2020

It won't be long before baseball fans get their first look at the Cubs under new manager David Ross.

ESPN announced Thursday they will broadcast two of the Cubs' first four games in 2020: March 29 against the Brewers in Milwaukee (Sunday Night Baseball) and March 30 against the Pirates (3 p.m. first pitch). The latter game is the Cubs' 2020 home opener.

Ross worked as a color analyst for ESPN from 2017-19 before the Cubs hired him as manager in October. So, not only will his club be in the national spotlight early in the season, but his former co-workers will be the ones analyzing him as his managerial career kicks off.

The Cubs open the season on March 26 against the Brewers.

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Willson Contreras’ trade value just spiked, thanks to White Sox signing Yasmani Grandal

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USA TODAY

Willson Contreras’ trade value just spiked, thanks to White Sox signing Yasmani Grandal

This is the best thing the White Sox have done for the Cubs in years.

The White Sox made a big splash in free agency Thursday, signing catcher Yasmani Grandal to a four-year, $73 million contract. Grandal joins the South Siders from the Brewers, where he played an integral role in Milwaukee making a second-straight postseason appearance in 2019.

Grandal led qualified catchers in on-base percentage (.380) last season, also posting career highs in home runs (28) and RBIs (77). He’s also an excellent pitch framer, tying for fourth in RszC (runs saved by catcher framing) among all catchers with 9.

Milwaukee’s payroll reached a franchise-high $122.5 million in 2019 and their farm system (No. 29 in MLB, per Baseball America) is lacking. How they replace Grandal’s production is a major question mark, which in turn is a win for the Cubs this offseason.

But besides plucking him from the NL Central, the White Sox signing Grandal early in the offseason helps the Cubs, who have important decisions of their own to make.

Although Cubs president Theo Epstein said to take any trade rumors with a “mouthful of salt,” multiple teams believe catcher Willson Contreras is available for trade. The Cubs need to retool their roster and replenish a farm system that has been depleted in recent seasons from numerous “win now” trades.

The Cubs and White Sox made the notorious José Quintana trade in July 2017, but it’s unlikely the two would have matched up for a Contreras trade. The Cubs need young assets; trading away young assets is the last thing the White Sox want to do as their championship window opens.

So, Grandal landed with a team that was unlikely to be involved in any potential Contreras trade talks. Grandal was the best free agent catcher; Contreras is the best catcher that can be had in a trade.

Other teams interested in Grandal — such as the Reds — can no longer turn to him in free agency. The Rays have made addressing the catcher spot this winter a priority, but they have one of MLB’s lowest payrolls each season. Signing Grandal wasn’t going to happen, but Tampa Bay has the farm system (No. 2 in baseball, per MLB.com) to make a big trade.

Contreras is the best catcher available — for the right price, obviously — so the ball is in the Cubs' court. They don’t get better by dealing their two-time All-Star backstop, but Contreras’ trade value is high. With Grandal off the market, it just got even higher.

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