Cubs

Cubs' offseason moves just beginning

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Cubs' offseason moves just beginning

The Cubs are far from done as they continue putting their roster together for 2013, while Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer also work on completely overhauling an organization that was in far worse shape than they realized when they accepted the Cubs challenge.
From talking with a collection of agents and baseball sources over the past few days, the Cubs left Nashville and the annual Winter Meetings with a handful of short term needs on their shopping list. They are hoping to add a veteran center fielder who can play regularly. This would allow them to put David DeJesus back in his more natural position of right field which is where they originally intended on playing him when he was signed in November 2011.
The Cubs are also hoping to add another starting pitcher, but most agents I spoke with believe they will not spend significant money unless they are adding a definite upgrade after adding Scott Baker and Scott Feldman early in free agency. The candidates still on the market that have been on the Cubs' list include Shaun Marcum, Jair Jurrjens, John Lannan, Joe Saunders and Francisco Liriano. The Twins were hopeful of bringing Liriano back but reports today out of Minnesota seem to indicate that the two sides are at a stalemate.
Ryan Dempsters name has been linked to the Cubs on a number of occasions, but unless he is willing to accept a short term deal the Cubs have no interest in giving him the three-year contract he is seeking. Sources tell me they have not had substantive talks since the end of the 2012 season. He has already rejected a two-year, 25 million offer from the Red Sox as he holds out for a third guaranteed year.
But those offers do not seem to be coming his way. He will probably have to accept a two-year deal with an option for a third year, with the Milwaukee Brewers in hot pursuit along with a handful of other clubs.
Consider that the Cubs were able to land both Feldman and Baker on one-year deals for very modest salaries compared to the money that is now going to other mediocre starters. Joe Blanton landed a 15 million deal over two years and Kevin Correia, who signed with the Minnesota Twins for 10 million over two years, are examples. Todays market makes it imperative to strike early when going after pitching before the supply dries up and the demand sends contracts skyrocketing.
In addition to another starter, the Cubs are looking to add a right-handed bat that can play third base but the options there are extremely limited in free agency. Forget reports that had the Cubs linked to Placido Polanco, as his lack of power has the Cubs looking elsewhere. Other names they have at least explored include what it would take to land Texas Rangers prospect Mike Olt, Jack Hannahan and former Cub Casey McGehee.
The Cubs have already re-signed Ian Stewart to a one-year deal that will only become guaranteed if he makes the Opening Day roster, but that signing cannot be putting much confidence into the Cubs' fan base after Stewarts abysmal 2012 season that ended on the Disabled List. Its hard to believe that there was no better option available than a guy who appears to be a former first round bust.
Olt is ranked as one of the better third base prospects in baseball, along with Tigers minor leaguer Nick Castellanos, but the price to acquire either one appears to be prohibitive. The irony of trying to acquire Olt is that he would probably already be a Cub had Matt Garza not gotten injured last summer, which derailed the Cubs plans to trade him to Texas in a blockbuster deal.
The Cubs are also hoping to upgrade their bullpen with another move, but before they can add another significant arm they have to figure out what they are going to do with Carlos Marmol. They considered trading him to the Los Angeles Angels in a deal for starter Dan Haren, but backed away after becoming squeamish about Harens medical history and significant price tag. Marmol had a solid 2012 season when he was reinstalled as the Cubs closer after an early season demotion, and still has value pitching at the back end of games.
Most scouts that I spoke with believe that his high-wire act will scare off many teams when they look at his 9.8 million salary, but they also believe that some teams will take a chance on him if they are moving a high salary back in the deal. The Yankees, who are looking for bullpen insurance as Mariano Rivera tries to come back from ACL surgery have no interest in Marmol despite having former Cubs' pitching coach Larry Rothschild on their staff.

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred: 'We weren’t going to play more than 60 games'

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred: 'We weren’t going to play more than 60 games'

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred made an interesting revelation Wednesday about negotiations between MLB and the players union. In an interview with Dan Patrick, Manfred said the 2020 season was never going to be more than 60 games given the spread of the coronavirus — at least by the time they got to serious negotiations two weeks ago.

“The reality is we weren’t going to play more than 60 games, no matter how the negotiation with the players went, or any other factor," Manfred said on The Dan Patrick Show. "Sixty games is outside the envelope given the realities of the virus. I think this is the one thing that we come back to every single day: We’re trying to manage something that has proven to be unpredictable and unmanageable.

"I know it hasn’t looked particularly pretty in spots, but having said that, if we can pull off this 60-game season, I think it was the best we were gonna do for our fans given the course of the virus."

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Manfred unilaterally imposed a 60-game season after the two sides couldn't come to terms. The union rejected the owners' final proposal, retaining the right to file a grievance against the owners for not negotiating in good faith.

Whether Manfred's comments become a point of contention in any grievance the players might file is unclear. The league would likely argue Manfred was referring to negotiations after his face-to-face meeting with MLBPA executive director Tony Clark on June 16. Manfred's comments to Patrick's follow up question — if the league would have been willing to go to 80 games, had the players agreed to all their terms — also points to this.

"It’s the calendar, Dan. We’re playing 60 games in 63 days. I don’t see — given the reality of the health situation over the past few weeks — how we were gonna get going any faster than the calendar we’re on right now, no matter what the state of those negotiations were.

"Look, we did get a sub-optimal result from the negotiation in some ways. The fans aren’t gonna get an expanded postseason, which I think would have been good with the shortened season. The players left real money on the table. But that’s what happens when you have a negotiation that instead of being collaborative, gets into sort of a conflict situation.”

The players' final proposal called for a 70-game season. At this point in the calendar, 60 games in 69 days (Sept. 27 is the reported end date for the regular season) leaves room for a couple more games, not 70 (or more).

So, Manfred's right that 60 games on the current timetable was probably the most MLB can fit in amid the pandemic. But you have to wonder if the union will use those comments in a potential grievance. 

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Cubs fan base named second most loyal in MLB, only trailing Red Sox

Cubs fan base named second most loyal in MLB, only trailing Red Sox

When you wait more than 100 years for a championship, you must maintain a strong sense of loyalty to your favorite team. 

Cubs fans have done that, supporting the club through thick and thin, from the mediocre years to the curse-breaking 2016 World Series season. They pack the Wrigley Field stands, consistently ranking in the top 10 in attendance season after season.

That devotion led to Forbes naming Cubs fans the second most loyal fan base in Major League Baseball, second to only the Red Sox.

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Per Forbes, the rankings are based on "local television ratings (per Nielsen), stadium attendance based on capacity reached, secondary ticket demand (per StubHub), merchandise sales (per Fanatics), social media reach (Facebook and Twitter followers based on the team’s metro area population) and hometown crowd reach (defined by Nielsen as a percentage of the metropolitan area population that watched, attended and/or listened to a game in the last year)."

All that science aside, does the 108-year wait for a championship warrant the Cubs being first on this list? In fairness, the Red Sox waited 86 years before winning the 2004 World Series, their first since 1918. Plus, in terms of attendance, the Cubs have only out-drawn the Red Sox in six of the past 10 seasons, a near-equal split.

Two historic clubs. Two historic ballparks. Two historic championships. In a loyalty ranking, you can't go wrong with either franchise. Here's how the list's top 10 panned out:

10. Braves
9. Phillies
8. Indians
7. Giants
6. Brewers
5. Dodgers
4. Yankees
3. Cardinals
2. Cubs
1. Red Sox

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