Cubs

Cubs starter Brett Anderson likely headed to DL after 'embarrassing' loss to Yankees

Cubs starter Brett Anderson likely headed to DL after 'embarrassing' loss to Yankees

The sound of boos filled Wrigley Field in the first inning as Brett Anderson walked off the mound Saturday night with assistant athletic trainer Ed Halbur, Cubs fans already on edge with the New York Yankees leading by five runs in another national TV game.

Pitching coach Chris Bosio pointed to his side as he looked at home plate umpire Alan Porter while manager Joe Maddon motioned toward what had become a nine-man bullpen, a clear sign the Cubs didn't trust Anderson against The Bronx Bombers.

"It's embarrassing," Anderson said at least four times in the interview room after an 11-6 loss to the Yankees in front of a disappearing crowd of 40,735.

Less than 30 minutes before first pitch, a voice on the press box loudspeaker announced that the Cubs designated outfielder Matt Szczur for assignment and promoted lefty Rob Zastryzny from Triple-A Iowa, the day after sending reliever Justin Grimm to Des Moines and calling up right-hander Felix Pena.

The chain reaction started five days earlier, when Anderson couldn't finish the second inning during a 10-2 loss to the Philadelphia Phillies, taxing the bullpen at a time when the rest of the rotation still appears to be trying to ramp up after back-to-back playoff runs into October.

Anderson called that "kind of a colossal failure." This led to Miguel Montero tipping his cap as he ran off the field after throwing a scoreless ninth inning, a distraction from an ugly loss.

"Whenever the backup catcher gets more outs than you, that's obviously not a positive," Anderson said. "You need to figure some things out and get healthy."

The Cubs described Anderson as being evaluated for "low back tightness" and expect him to go on the disabled list after a thumping Yankee lineup made this look like batting practice, hitting the ball all over Wrigley Field.

Anderson said he felt his back stiffen up when he fielded an Aaron Hicks bunt and bounced the ball away from first baseman Anthony Rizzo, allowing the first run to score. At that point, a Fox Sports camera got a classic reaction shot of a visibly annoyed Maddon, the normally cool manager shaking his head in the dugout.

Combine Anderson's last two starts and the lefty has gotten five outs and given up 12 runs, allowing 13 hits and a walk to the 19 batters he faced.

"We just can't continue on that path right now," Maddon said.

So much for the best defense in the majors last year backing up the guy who put up a 66.7 groundball percentage and made 31 starts for the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2015.

The extensive medical file - Anderson has already undergone two surgical procedures on his lower back and landed on the disabled list nine times since 2010 - led to a one-year, incentive-laden $3.5 million deal this winter as the Cubs tried to reshape the rotation that would defend their World Series title.

"With my history, you never want to take it too lightly," Anderson said. "It's a combination of getting healthy and figuring out how to get people out again, because right now every ball that's put in play seems like it's a hit, and every ball that's put in play seems like it's a run.

"I haven't given us a chance."

Anderson said this issue was on a different side than his previous back injuries, that this time he didn't feel pain shooting down his leg. Anderson doesn't believe it's a disc problem and hopes it can be written off as spasms. But it's time for the Cubs to find the next man up.

"Everything that can go wrong has gone wrong here lately," Anderson said. "I still think when I'm healthy and everything's going right, for the most part, I'm a good pitcher.

"I still have confidence in myself. I could sulk and be mad at myself, but I got to deal with it. I wouldn't be in the league this long if I hadn't been able to put some things behind me and deal with the cards I've been dealt."

Overheard at Cubs Convention: A collection of the funniest and weirdest moments from the 2019 fan fest

Overheard at Cubs Convention: A collection of the funniest and weirdest moments from the 2019 fan fest

The only Harper in attendance at the Sheraton Grand Chicago over the weekend was the Winter Storm Harper, not that dude named Bryce.

The Cubs seamlessly jumped from Cole Hamels to Kyle Hendricks in the alphabetical introductions at Opening Ceremonies Friday night, crushing the dreams of anybody who believed there would be a surprise visit from the superstar outfielder.

"The sad thing is it's going to be snowing this much in April too," one fan quipped. And it doesn't look like Harper will be in a Cubs uniform by then, either, as Theo Epstein reiterated it's "extremely unlikely" the Cubs sign a mega free agent of any kind this winter.

But that didn't stop Cubs fans, players, coaches and executives from having a blast at the 34th annual Convention.

Here are some of the top moments from the 2019 fan fest:

♦♦Bryant made headlines and pissed off the entirety of Cardinals Nation when he jokingly said St. Louis is "boring" during the late-night show with Ryan Dempster. 

It wound up becoming the talk of the Convention.

♦♦Kyle Hendricks was asked about any pranks he's played on his teammates and he confirmed he is not a big prankster (big surprise there), but did reference one time last year when a teammate hid in Anthony Rizzo's locker with an airhorn and jumped out to scare the Cubs first baseman.

♦♦Daniel Descalso has been the only real addition to the 2019 roster and the former Cardinal wasted no time endearing himself to Cubs fans.

A young fan asked Descalso which convention is better — Cubs or Cardinals? Descalso didn't even let the kid finish his question before he said: "This one."

♦♦This great story about Cubs draft pick Cole Roederer came on the last panel of the weekend Sunday morning with Cubs Senior Vice President of Player Development and Amateur Scouting Jason McLeod and Director of Player Development Jaron Madison:

♦♦As usual, a great hand for Kerry Wood:

♦♦A couple fans were playing a drinking game during Theo Epstein's session, taking a sip every time the Cubs president reminded folks the team actually won 95 games in 2018 or referenced the sense of urgency surrounding the organization this year.

♦♦Kris Bryant: The Hitting Poet

♦♦There are always a lot of random jerseys at any Cubs Convention, but one of the weirdest I've ever seen came this winter: an Arismendy Alcantara shirsey. 

I totally understand wanting to sport your favorite Cubs gear over the weekend — and that may include a Mark Grace jersey, Sammy Sosa button down or even a Corey Patterson shirsey — but Arismendy Alcantara? Dude played only half a season's worth of games in Chicago (81) between 2014-15.

And no, it wasn't actually Arismendy Alcantara wearing his own jersey.

Very odd, but maybe that was the point?

♦♦Somehow, Theo made it through an entire hour-long panel facing somewhere around 20 questions from fans without anybody bringing up Harper by name. 

♦♦Anthony Rizzo wasn't able to attend the Convention this year due to a conflict with his honeymoon, but he Facetimed in anyways:

♦♦Why did Kyle Hendricks decide to become a pitcher?

♦♦One kid has a future in journalism, asking Theo point-blank: "Do you plan on bringing Joe Maddon back as manager next year?"

Theo responded by saying, "I certainly hope so."

♦♦Eloy Jimenez and Dylan Cease were brought up multiple times by fans in the "Down on the Farm" segment with McLeod and Madison. Two fans asked about the former top prospects in the same span of 5 minutes and each time, McLeod and Madison reiterated the same thing the organization has said for nearly two years now: The Cubs felt it was worth it to make the deal with the White Sox to acquire a stable workhorse in their rotation for years to come in Jose Quintana.

♦♦One fan (looked to be in his mid-20s or so) started off his question to Theo by letting everybody know his cat is named Theo. He then proceeded to ask Theo — a Patriots fan — if he thinks Tom Brady is the GOAT and if so, has he ever seen Aaron Rodgers play?

Theo joked about how he watched Khalil Mack get the best of Rodgers this year before admitting that yes, he believes Brady is the greatest QB of all time. 

♦♦Kyle Farnsworth was in attendance and as Pat Hughes introduced him during Opening Ceremonies, the voice of Cubs radio touted the former relievers' ability to throw the ball 100 mph, prompting this comment from a fan:

"They should bring him back and add him to this year's bullpen."

Farnsworth is 42 and hasn't played professional baseball in years, but the Cubs could certainly use another reliever (even by their own admission), so it's hard to blame the fan.

♦♦Does Ben Zobrist prefer playing outfield or infield?

"Infield," the 37-year-old said because he "doesn't have to run as far."

♦♦KB's got jokes:

♦♦A teenager felt the need to start his "question" by telling a panel of Bryant, Zobrist Willson Contreras and Javy Baez that he has "had trouble getting girls lately" and proceeded to ask for a picture.

♦♦The second fan question of 2019 Cubs Con was a fan who began by thanking Maddon for letting Rizzo pitch last year.

♦♦New Cubs bench coach Mark Loretta joked MLB could speed up pace of play by having a bullpen cart for every reliever coming into the game...or a Harley Davidson for guys to ride to the mound on.

♦♦Towards the end of the coaches panel, a kid got on the microphone to ask Maddon if he still supports the decision to let Pedro Strop hit for himself on that fateful afternoon in Washington D.C. on Sept. 13. (That was the play Strop injured his hamstring on and he went on to make just one appearance the rest of the season — in the NL Wild-Card Game.)

Maddon maintained the same stance he's taken since then — saying any criticism of the decision now is outcome bias and he can't predict injuries on any given play.

♦♦One fan asked Maddon "what he's going to do about" the fact only a few Cubs players show up for the National Anthem at Wrigley Field, calling it "embarrassing" and a "disgrace." 

Maddon handled it well, defending the players and saying the National Anthem often falls at a tough time for most guys when they're still preparing for the game. 

It's worth noting: the Anthem is optional in baseball. Every sport is different, so just because the NHL or NBA players line up and face the flag for those 2-3 minutes doesn't mean MLB will be the same.

Maybe they should, but regardless of where you stand on that issue, it's not Maddon's responsibility to police all 25 of his players to be attentive for the National Anthem. He's got plenty else to worry about.

♦♦Some fans asking questions are just savage:

♦♦One fan told Mark Loretta how excited he was for the new Cubs bench coach to join the staff because the guy's mom is named "Loretta" and his dad is named "Mark." 

Yu Darvish is ready for takeoff

Yu Darvish is ready for takeoff

Yu know the Cubs season is right around the corner when we catch word of a Darvish bullpen.

Darvish still hasn't even been a member of the Cubs organization for a full calendar year, but almost that entire time has been spent with the focus firmly on his health.

That hasn't changed for the 32-year-old pitcher enjoying his first Cubs Convention amid Winter Storm Harper at the Sheraton Grand Chicago this weekend.

Darvish said he is fully healthy now and his offseason program is progressing along slowly after he underwent a debridement procedure on his right elbow in September.

Darvish was slated to throw from 120 feet for the first time Saturday, planning 20 pitches from that distance. From there, he will have a bullpen on Friday.

"His health is everything, clearly," Theo Epstein said. "I know it's not worth anything at this point of the calendar, but the reports are terrific. He's added a lot of good muscle, he's added a lot of flexibility.

"Most importantly, his arm feels terrific. He's experiencing no discomfort whatsoever when throwing and when testing his arm. He's walking around with a little bit of confidence. I think that reflects how he's feeling about himself physically."

Cubs fans might be sick of hearing this narrative, but a healthy Darvish really can do a quite a bit in changing the team's overall fortunes for 2019. This is a guy who strikes out batters at a higher rate than any other starting pitcher in baseball history and even when he was able to pitch in 2018, he sported an ERA more than a run-and-a-half higher than his previous career mark.

The Cubs know their road to success goes through the starting rotation (even nowadays in the world of extreme bullpenning) and Darvish has emerged as the ultimate X-factor.

An offseason of rest and rehab has Darvish and the Cubs feeling confident with less than a month until pitchers and catchers report to spring training.

"Now, the important part starts," Epstein said. "Just taking that into spring training and into the season and being ready for the battle and getting some really good hitters out and being someone we can lean on in that rotation."

The Cubs had enough concerns about their overall state of the rotation (including Darvish) that they picked up Cole Hamels' $20 million option despite a serious budget crunch this winter.

But Hamels — Darvish's former teammate with the Rangers — has something most Cubs fans don't: A firsthand look at how dominating Darvish can be when he's healthy.

"I know he wants to do really well," Hamels said. "And he's capable of so much. You've seen bits and pieces when he was with Texas and the Dodgers for a few games — he's really good. He can carry a game; he can carry a month of starts for a team.

"So to be able to put him in between all of us and all of us working together, it's going to be a lights-out rotation. That's what it takes. I know he's ready to do it. When he's healthy, he's one of the best in the game."