Cubs

The End: Cubs cant see into the future

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The End: Cubs cant see into the future

Box Score
PENA: I'd love to return
READ: Ricketts leaves Cubs waiting for answers
SORIANO: I don't want to be on another losing team
DEMPSTER: It's an end to what's been a rough season

SAN DIEGO They pulled beers from the cooler and stood around the clubhouse, watching the fantastic finishes in Baltimore and Tampa Bay, not wanting to walk out to the bus just yet.

They cheered and screamed at the side-by-side television screens that showed the Red Sox collapsing and the Rays celebrating. No one in the room knew what that meant for their general manager search. But everyone understood that change is coming.

The Cubs knew they werent going to the playoffs months ago. It was a lost summer without much on-field drama or suspense.

Year 103 without a World Series title officially ended inside PETCO Park at 8:13 p.m. Pacific time. The same group that finished at 71-91 after Wednesdays 9-2 loss to the Padres wont be brought back together again.

Another fifth-place finish already cost Jim Hendry his job. It could take down manager Mike Quade and his coaching staff before the next head of baseball operations starts gutting the roster. The blame game will continue in what should be a very long winter.

You can bring here whoever you think the best manager in the big leagues is, Aramis Ramirez said. I dont think its going to be any different. The bottom line is as players we didnt get it done.

The manager doesnt take the field. The players take the field. The numbers dont lie. Go ahead and look at the numbers offensively, defensively, pitching-wise we didnt get it done. The manager had nothing to do with it.

Pitching and defense is supposed to be the name of the game. The Cubs led the majors in errors (134), and their staff never did live up to expectations (4.33 ERA). They didnt hit with runners in scoring position either.

Their rotation couldnt withstand the loss of Randy Wells and Andrew Cashner during the first week of the season. Their roster was paralyzed by the big-money contracts handed out during the final days of the Tribune Co.

The faces of the franchise are about to change.

Ramirez could follow Ozzie Guillen and take his talents to South Beach. Carlos Zambranos collection of bobblehead dolls is already cleared out of the clubhouse, and no one expects to see him pitch for this team again. Alfonso Soriano may have played his final game in a Cubs uniform.

I dont think about it, Soriano said. If they want to trade me, (I) hope they trade me to a good team, a contender. If not, I want to be here. I love it here. It all depends on what they want to do."

The next general manager will probably want to build around Starlin Castro, a 21-year-old All-Star shortstop who finished the season with 207 hits and by reaching base safely in 40 consecutive games. The Hall of Fame requested his jersey from Wednesdays game.

I know I can do better, Castro said.

Besides Castros flashes of brilliance and moments where he totally lost concentration there was the sight of Matt Garza screaming into his glove yet again. And Marlon Byrd kicking his legs into the air after a fastball knocked him to the ground and shattered his face. And Ryan Dempster yelling at Quade from the top step of the dugout.

There was the silence of one of the best-kept secrets in franchise history, Hendry doing his job for almost a month knowing that he was fired. He kept almost the entire team intact at the trade deadline, closed on a draft class that cost almost 12 million and loved calling Zambrano on his retirement bluff.

The Cubs didnt unload Carlos Pena because they wanted the next management team to have the option of re-signing the first baseman, assuming they dont go hard after Albert Pujols or Prince Fielder. Pena watched Wednesdays game thinking this might be the end.

I would be lying if (I said) that didnt go through my mind, Pena said. I try to focus on the fact that I had the privilege of playing for the Cubs. I wore the uniform with a lot of pride and Im very grateful for the opportunity.

I also understand how the business of baseball works and that there are some things the Cubs need to do in the top office. (They) have their hands full (and) I understand that. (I) would love to return. I just really dont know what the future holds.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

The most underrated storyline of the Cubs offseason

The most underrated storyline of the Cubs offseason

There are plenty of intriguing Cubs storylines to monitor this offseason from their potential pursuit of the big free agents to any other changes that may come to the coaching staff or roster after a disappointing finish to the 2018 campaign.

But there's one question simmering under the radar in Cubs circles when it comes to this winter: How will the team solve the shortstop conundrum?

Just a few years ago, the Cubs had "too many" shortstops. Now, there are several different factors at play here that makes it a convoluted mess.

First: What will the Cubs do with Addison Russell? The embattled shortstop is in the midst of a suspension for domestic violence that will keep him off an MLB diamond for at least the first month of 2019.

Has Russell already played his last game with the Cubs? Will they trade him or send him packing in any other fashion this winter?

Theo Epstein mentioned several times he felt the organization needs to show support to the victim in the matter (Russell's ex-wife, Melisa) but also support for Russell. Does that mean they would keep him a part of the team at least through the early part of 2019?

Either way, Russell's days in Chicago are numbered and his play on the field took another big step back in 2018 as he fought through a hand injury and experienced a major dip in power. With his performance on the field and the off-field issues, it will be hard to justify a contract worth somewhere in the neighborhood of $4 million in his second year of arbitration (prorated, with a month's worth of pay taken out for the suspension).

Even if Russell is on the roster in 2019, Javy Baez is unquestionably the shortstop for at least the first month while Russell is on suspension. 

But what about beyond Baez if the Cubs want to give him a breather or disaster strikes and he's forced to miss time with an injury?

At the moment, there's nothing but question marks on the current Cubs shortstop depth chart throughout the entire organization and they're certainly going to need other options at the most important defensive position (outside of pitcher/catcher). 

There's David Bote, who subbed in for Baez at short once in September when Baez needed a break and Russell was on the disabled list. But while Bote's defense at third base and second base has opened eyes around the Cubs, he has only played 45 games at short across seven minor-league seasons, including 15 games in 2018. There's also the offensive question marks with the rookie, who hit just .176 with a .559 OPS and 40 strikeouts in 108 at-bats after that epic ultimate grand slam on Aug. 12.

The Cubs' other current shortstop options include Mike Freeman (a 31-year-old career minor-leaguer), Ben Zobrist (who will be 38 in 2019 and has played all of 13 innings at shortstop since 2014), Ryan Court (a 30-year-old career minor leaguer) and Chesny Young (a 26-year-old minor-leaguer who has posted a .616 OPS in 201 Triple-A games).

Maybe Joe Maddon would actually deploy Kris Bryant at shortstop in case of emergency like a Baez injury ("necessity is the mother of invention," as Maddon loves to say), but that seems a lot more like a fun talking point than a legit option at this current juncture.

So even if Russell sticks around, there's no way the Cubs can go into the first month of the season with just Baez and Bote as the only shortstop options on a team that with World Series or bust expectations.

The Cubs will need to acquire some shortstop depth this winter in some capacity, whether it's adding to the Triple-A Iowa roster or getting a veteran who can also back up other positions. Right now, the free agent pool of potential shortstops is pretty slim beyond Manny Machado.

Epstein always says he and his front office look to try to mitigate risk and analyze where things could go wrong to sink the Cubs' season and through that lense, shortstop is suddenly right up there behind adding more bullpen help this winter.

Podcast: In light of recent hitting coach turmoil, who’s to blame for Cubs offensive struggles?

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USA TODAY

Podcast: In light of recent hitting coach turmoil, who’s to blame for Cubs offensive struggles?

On the latest Cubs Talk Podcast, David Kaplan, Kelly Crull, Luke Stuckmeyer and Tony Andracki discuss the comments Chili Davis made after being fired as Cubs hitting coach, ask if the Cubs struggles on offense were Davis' fault or the players and what Anthony Iapoce will be walking into as he tries to gets the team back on track a the plate.

 

Listen to the entire podcast here, or in the embedded player below: