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Examining where the Cubs' roster stands after Jackson signing

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Examining where the Cubs' roster stands after Jackson signing

As the Cubs added two more pitchers to the mix Thursday, the Opening Day roster has rounded into focus a bit more.

RELATED: Cubs send 52 million message in signing Edwin Jackson

Edwin Jackson and Carlos Villanueva figure to be integral parts of the pitching staff in 2013. If Villanueva doesn't crack the rotation to start, he will have an impact in the bullpen and provide insurance should a starter suffer through injury or ineffectiveness.

Jackson and Villanueva join Scott Baker, Scott Feldman, Kyuji Fujikawa, Hector Rondon, Cory Wade and Sandy Rosario as new additions to the Cubs' pitching staff this offseason.

With so much shake-up, let's take a look at what the 25-man roster could be when the Cubs break camp and head to Wrigley Field. Keep in mind, there's still roughly two months left in the offseason, so things may change an awful lot between now and then.

Position players

C: Welington CastilloDioner Navarro
1B: Anthony Rizzo
2B: Darwin Barney
3B: Ian StewartLuis Valbuena
SS: Starlin Castro
LF: Alfonso Soriano
CF: David DeJesusTony Campana
RF: Nate SchierholtzDave Sappelt

The Cubs are hoping Castillo can, indeed, fulfill his promise as a catcher of the future, and Navarro should provide a veteran presence and help mentor Castillo. Steve Clevenger also figures to be in the mix. He was handed the job of Geovany Soto's backup in spring training last season. There's a chance Clevenger winds up cracking the roster as a third catcher and backup first baseman.

Journeymen Brian Bogusevic (outfield) and Edwin Maysonet (infield) may take on utility roles, with young guns Brett Jackson and Josh Vitters waiting in the wings in Triple-A. Expect some more changes to this group, as the Cubs currently lack position player depth.

Pitchers

SP: Matt Garza
SP: Jeff Samardzija
SP: Edwin Jackson
SP: Travis WoodScott Baker
SP: Carlos VillanuevaScott FeldmanArodys Vizcaino

CL: Carlos Marmol
RP: Kyuji Fujikawa
RP: Shawn Camp
RP: James Russell
RP: Hector Rondon
RP: Michael BowdenSandy RosarioCory WadeRafael Dolis

The Cubs signed Wade this week in an under-the-radar move. The 29-year-old righty has a career 3.65 ERA and 1.12 WHIP in four seasons with the Dodgers and Yankees. But his big league career has been marked by inconsistency -- he had an ERA of 2.27 in '08 and 2.04 in '11, but ERAs of 5.53 in 2009 and 6.46 in '12 -- so there's no guarantees.

Whoever doesn't crack the starting rotation figures to be moved to the bullpen, with Feldman and Villanueva having spent extended time as relievers in the past. Wood may also be an option as a reliever, providing another left-handed arm for manager Dale Sveum to call on.

There's also no guarantee Garza or Baker are healthy at the beginning of the year, as each is coming off an elbow injury. Vizcaino is coming off Tommy John, and as Insider Patrick Mooney has said all winter, will be brought along slowly.

RELATED: Would Cubs go all-in on Samardzija or Garza?

Rondon is a Rule 5 draft pick, so the Cubs have to keep him on the 25-man roster all year or risk losing him. They can also put him on the disabled list -- as they did with Lendy Castillo last season -- to retain his services beyond 2013 even if he struggles to get outs in the majors, but the MLB is reportedly cracking down on such loopholes this season, so he may fill a roster spot all year.

Dolis spent part of last season as the closer when Marmol went to the DL and could find his way back in the big-league bullpen at some point in 2013.

Young lefties Jeff Beliveau, Chris Rusin and Brooks Raley could be in the mix as well and Castillo, Casey Coleman, Marcos Mateo, Blake Parker, Jensen Lewis and Jason Berken are other options from the right side. Alberto Cabrera has been stretched out a bit as a starter this fall and winter and may wind up an option in the rotation or bullpen late in the season while 2011 draft pick Tony Zych is quickly climbing through the system.

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred: 'We weren’t going to play more than 60 games'

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred: 'We weren’t going to play more than 60 games'

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred made an interesting revelation Wednesday about negotiations between MLB and the players union. In an interview with Dan Patrick, Manfred said the 2020 season was never going to be more than 60 games given the spread of the coronavirus — at least by the time they got to serious negotiations two weeks ago.

“The reality is we weren’t going to play more than 60 games, no matter how the negotiation with the players went, or any other factor," Manfred said on The Dan Patrick Show. "Sixty games is outside the envelope given the realities of the virus. I think this is the one thing that we come back to every single day: We’re trying to manage something that has proven to be unpredictable and unmanageable.

"I know it hasn’t looked particularly pretty in spots, but having said that, if we can pull off this 60-game season, I think it was the best we were gonna do for our fans given the course of the virus."

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Manfred unilaterally imposed a 60-game season after the two sides couldn't come to terms. The union rejected the owners' final proposal, retaining the right to file a grievance against the owners for not negotiating in good faith.

Whether Manfred's comments become a point of contention in any grievance the players might file is unclear. The league would likely argue Manfred was referring to negotiations after his face-to-face meeting with MLBPA executive director Tony Clark on June 16. Manfred's comments to Patrick's follow up question — if the league would have been willing to go to 80 games, had the players agreed to all their terms — also points to this.

"It’s the calendar, Dan. We’re playing 60 games in 63 days. I don’t see — given the reality of the health situation over the past few weeks — how we were gonna get going any faster than the calendar we’re on right now, no matter what the state of those negotiations were.

"Look, we did get a sub-optimal result from the negotiation in some ways. The fans aren’t gonna get an expanded postseason, which I think would have been good with the shortened season. The players left real money on the table. But that’s what happens when you have a negotiation that instead of being collaborative, gets into sort of a conflict situation.”

The players' final proposal called for a 70-game season. At this point in the calendar, 60 games in 69 days (Sept. 27 is the reported end date for the regular season) leaves room for a couple more games, not 70 (or more).

So, Manfred's right that 60 games on the current timetable was probably the most MLB can fit in amid the pandemic. But you have to wonder if the union will use those comments in a potential grievance. 

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Cubs fan base named second most loyal in MLB, only trailing Red Sox

Cubs fan base named second most loyal in MLB, only trailing Red Sox

When you wait more than 100 years for a championship, you must maintain a strong sense of loyalty to your favorite team. 

Cubs fans have done that, supporting the club through thick and thin, from the mediocre years to the curse-breaking 2016 World Series season. They pack the Wrigley Field stands, consistently ranking in the top 10 in attendance season after season.

That devotion led to Forbes naming Cubs fans the second most loyal fan base in Major League Baseball, second to only the Red Sox.

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Per Forbes, the rankings are based on "local television ratings (per Nielsen), stadium attendance based on capacity reached, secondary ticket demand (per StubHub), merchandise sales (per Fanatics), social media reach (Facebook and Twitter followers based on the team’s metro area population) and hometown crowd reach (defined by Nielsen as a percentage of the metropolitan area population that watched, attended and/or listened to a game in the last year)."

All that science aside, does the 108-year wait for a championship warrant the Cubs being first on this list? In fairness, the Red Sox waited 86 years before winning the 2004 World Series, their first since 1918. Plus, in terms of attendance, the Cubs have only out-drawn the Red Sox in six of the past 10 seasons, a near-equal split.

Two historic clubs. Two historic ballparks. Two historic championships. In a loyalty ranking, you can't go wrong with either franchise. Here's how the list's top 10 panned out:

10. Braves
9. Phillies
8. Indians
7. Giants
6. Brewers
5. Dodgers
4. Yankees
3. Cardinals
2. Cubs
1. Red Sox

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