Cubs

Exposing Wrigley Field and 'Undercover Boss'

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Exposing Wrigley Field and 'Undercover Boss'

Monday, Nov. 8, 2010
9:06 AM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

Todd Ricketts still hadn't seen the final version before it finally went to air Sunday night, after a long lead-in from NFL programming and "60 Minutes." That was a negotiating point between the Cubs and CBS.

There was Ricketts in black glasses and a full beard selling hot dogs, working grounds crew and the parking lot, and being "fired" from his job hosing down the bathrooms.

By the end, an ownership group that can be guarded with the media didn't have anything to worry about with "Undercover Boss," which amounted to a huge advertisement for Wrigley Field.

"They needed to have full editorial control," Ricketts said Sunday night at Harry Caray's in Wrigleyville, where he watched the episode with his family and Cubs executives and staffers. "Inevitably, there would be something that we wanted to change or add (or take out). And so we caved and we let it go.

"I never felt nervous that it would turn out poorly. You just want to have control over what gets exposed and CBS was like: 'This is a feel-good show. We're not out to make anybody look bad. You're the narrator. The employees are the stars. That's how it will be.'"

Actually owning the Cubs does not come with an easy-to-follow script. This season would have seemed like a reality show even without the cameras following around a member of the team's board of directors.

There was the enigmatic pitcher in anger-management counseling (Carlos Zambrano), the rookie outfielder laying in a hospital bed (Tyler Colvin), the manager going home to take care of his family (Lou Piniella) and the Hall of Famer estranged from the organization (Ryne Sandberg).

They served caviar in the clubhouse and put a yellow noodle steps away from Wrigley Field's iconic marquee. And it didn't matter -- fans wanted their picture taken next to both.

"Undercover Boss," which has profiled executives from NASCAR, Frontier Airlines, and the hotel and resort industries, stayed away from the biggest names in the organization and gave a behind-the-scenes glimpse at its workers.

It gave a brief biographical sketch of Ricketts, the youngest of the four siblings who control the team. Tom is the chairman and face of ownership. Laura is an attorney and active in Democratic politics. Pete once ran for the U.S. Senate in Nebraska on the Republican ticket.

Todd, whose investments include a chain of bike shops in the northern suburbs, admitted that his role is undefined within the organization. He used to sit out in the bleachers as a Loyola University student, and for this he moved back into a Wrigleyville apartment, like he did some 20 years ago.

The White Sox had their reality show on the MLB Network, but Ricketts indicated that the Cubs don't have any other television projects currently in development. And whatever he learned filming during those several days near the end of a disappointing season won't really influence some of the big-picture issues surrounding the stadium.

"I don't know if anything will be really dramatically changed based on the stuff we found here," Ricketts said. "It's really just getting to know the people that work at Wrigley, exposing to the country how great they are, and (getting) Cubs fans to get a good inside look at what happens at Wrigley when they're not around."

Those employees work seasonal jobs that are not glamorous on nights and weekends. Ricketts found one a paid internship in the marketing department. Another got his classes paid for, and the one who cut loose Ricketts will receive a vacation to spring training with his family.

It has been a little more than a year since the Ricketts family purchased the Cubs and Wrigley Field -- and a stake in Comcast SportsNet -- from Tribune Co. for approximately 845 million. The group has been strategic and deliberate.

In a soft economy and a difficult political climate, the Cubs campaigned hard enough to get plans for new training facilities approved by voters in Mesa, Ariz.

After a 75-87 season that could have been much worse -- and heading into Year 103 without a World Series title -- they managed to add a new, more expensive pricing tier for select home games without a backlash because their message was that overall ticket prices would essentially remain flat in 2011.

In their final analysis, the exposure from CBS, and what it could mean to the brand, outweighed the perception of what it might look like.

"We didn't jump at it right away when they came," Ricketts said. "The big hang-up we had at that moment (was) we were concerned that it might be taken negatively that the team's not performing well, but yet we're filming these TV shows around Wrigley.

"My explanation to that is: I'm not out there pitching. I'm not playing."

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

As he decides what's next, it's clear Ben Zobrist has something left in the tank

As he decides what's next, it's clear Ben Zobrist has something left in the tank

When Ben Zobrist rejoined the Cubs active roster on Sept. 1, it was fair to wonder how much he could provide offensively. After all, he spent the previous four months on the restricted list while tending to a family matter, last playing a big-league game on May 6.

Zobrist did no baseball activities from May to mid-July, only working out to stay in shape. Although he eventually ramped things up, he played in just 12 minor league rehab games in August before returning to the Cubs, a small number compared to the length of his absence.

Even Zobrist admitted upon his big-league return that his timing at the plate wasn’t where he wanted it to be. And yet, what he did in September was nothing short of impressive. In 21 games, he posted a .284/.377/.388 slash line, performing at a level many couldn’t have expected, considering the circumstances.

Zobrist's impact on the Cubs' lineup goes beyond what you see in the box score, however. Not only is he a switch hitter with some pop, but he has a keen eye for the strike zone and frequently puts together professional at-bats.

On a Cubs team that tends to expand the zone, Zobrist’s presence mattered. In his second game back, for example, he went 3-for-3 with two walks, helping the Cubs beat the Brewers 10-5. After the game, Brewers starter Chase Anderson pointed out how different the Cubs' lineup looks with Zobrist in it.

"They play the matchups really well and Zobrist makes that team so much better," Anderson said on Sept. 5. "Just bringing his presence to the top of the lineup, it changes their dynamic a little bit."

Where Zobrist stands entering 2020, though, is currently unclear.

Zobrist is set to hit free agency after the World Series and will turn 39 next May. Therefore, it’s possible that he’s played his last game in the big leagues, as he has little, if anything, left to prove at this stage in his career.

Ahead of the Cubs’ season finale on Sept. 29, Zobrist told reporters in St. Louis that he hasn’t thought about how much time he’ll take before deciding what’s next for him. His family situation will obviously play a big role in his decision, but if September showed anything, it's that he still has something left in the tank.

“I’m 38 but I got that feeling all over again,” Zobrist said following the Cubs’ season finale, a 9-0 loss to the Cardinals in which he pitched a scoreless inning. “Just really fun, you know? It’s a fun game. Sometimes you don’t come out on the winning end, but you still gotta have fun with it and enjoy it. I enjoyed it today."

The Cubs roster is expected to undergo changes this offseason, with center field, second base and the leadoff spot being just a few areas the team will look to address. The latter two spots became revolving doors during Zobrist’s absence, as the Cubs struggled to replace what he brought offensively.

Zobrist is past the point in his career of being an everyday player. However, he still could be a useful asset for the Cubs in a supporting role, bringing his veteran approach to the lineup when he plays while still offering an experienced voice in the clubhouse.

“I take a lot of joy in that role, just being a supporting guy and being a part of winning clubs and part of winning atmospheres and cultures,” Zobrist said on Sept. 29. “The Chicago Cubs have been that since I’ve been around. This year we didn’t make the playoffs — we still have a winning record — (but) the kind of relationships that are built here and the culture that’s been built here is definitely a winning one.”

After the Cubs announced that they wouldn’t retain Joe Maddon for 2020, Zobrist acknowledged that more changes were likely coming in the offseason. Only time will tell what that means for the veteran utilityman — should he continue playing.

Whether he retires or joins a different team for 2020, though, Zobrist will look back on his four seasons with the Cubs fondly.

“(They’re) just the most passionate fans I’ve ever met,” he said of Cubs fans. “They’re very loyal, very passionate and it’s been such a pleasure to be a part of that team that beat the curse back in ’16, so I feel that still, when I see Cubs fans, there’s a lot of them that hug me and thank me for being a part of that.

“I’ll always look back at [my] time here — I don’t know what’s going to happen in the offseason — but look back at these four years and [be] very grateful to be able to be part of a group like this and be able to do what we did while I was here.”

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Cubs Talk Podcast: An ode to Joe Maddon and looking to the next era

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USA Today

Cubs Talk Podcast: An ode to Joe Maddon and looking to the next era

On the latest Cubs Talk Podcast, Tony Andracki, Kelly Crull, Scott Changnon and Jeff Nelson give us their memories of Joe Maddon's time with the Cubs and discuss David Ross and Joe Espada's candidacy to be the next manager.

01:30 Kelly's memories of Joe from the perspective of a reporter

06:00 Going back to Hazleton with Joe

07:45 Joe's legacy as manager of the Cubs

16:00 How Joe impacted Javy Baez' career

18:00 David Ross and Joe Espada may be the leaders to replace Joe Maddon.

Listen here or via the embedded player below:

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