Cubs

Game slips out of Starlin Castros hands

Game slips out of Starlin Castros hands

Monday, April 25, 2011
Posted: 9:55 p.m. Updated: 11:50 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

The Cubs watch Starlin Castro and see their shortstop get to balls they havent touched in years. His range and instincts are supposed to be that good.

And Castros offensive production has been so blinding that youve missed some of his defensive flaws this month. But it was impossible to ignore during the second inning of Monday nights 5-3 loss to the Colorado Rockies.

It began when Castro bobbled a ground ball that didnt seem like a big deal. The Cubs were already out to a 3-0 lead and had Matt Garza on the mound.

The conditions were perfect for a Big Ten football game. It was 43 degrees at first pitch and at certain points it was raining sideways. With runners on first and third and one out, Castro charged another ball and fumbled it on the handoff from his glove.

The ball was kind of wet, Castro said through an interpreter. I was trying to make the play. It was one of those things.

The next batter, Chris Iannetta, chopped one toward short and Castro tried to get the out at second base. His throw sailed wide to Darwin Barneys left, bouncing all the way into the bullpen in right-field foul territory, allowing two more unearned runs to score to tie the game.

Hes going to learn to play on tougher fields like this in these kinds of conditions, manager Mike Quade said. If youre in a hurry with a wet pig, youre in trouble.

You take a minute maybe you dont get to turn a double play. You make sure you get one. They dont have weather like this in the Dominican very often, so (its) another learning experience, but we got to get better (and) its got to happen pretty soon.

On the next play, Castro drew mock cheers from the crowd at Wrigley Field by making a routine throw to get the second out. His three errors marked the most for a Cub in a single inning since Jamie Navarro in 1996.

The Cubs grade on a curve because Castro is 21 years old, the youngest player in the majors.

But it didnt take long for the fans to turn on Castro, who got booed last May during his Wrigley Field debut. He committed three errors that night, but the breaking point was when he casually walked after a ball that skipped past him into shallow left field.

That got Castro called into Lou Piniellas office. Quade benched Castro for a few games last September as a response to some mental lapses, but has repeatedly praised his young shortstops maturity.

The Cubs didnt want to overwhelm Castro with leadoff responsibilities, but he excelled there so quickly (23-for-46) that hes getting more and more at-bats as the No. 3 hitter in the lineup.

Castro woke up on Monday tied for the major-league lead in hits with 35 and soon enough the All-Star buzz will start building.

This didnt seem to be as careless. It was just another reminder that at times Castro will have to slow the game down, even when everything else in his life is moving so fast.

Barney grew up as a shortstop in Oregon playing in the rain all the time. If Castro is who the Cubs project him to be, then he will have to get used to April in Chicago for years to come.

He did the best he could. (Thats) just how it goes, Barney said. He made the plays after that (and) showed some maturity there.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs Talk Podcast: Checking in with Joe & Theo at the Winter Meetings

theo_usa_today.png
USA TODAY

Cubs Talk Podcast: Checking in with Joe & Theo at the Winter Meetings

Tony Andracki goes 1-on-1 with manager Joe Maddon at the Winter Meetings in Las Vegas. The Cubs manager touches on his efforts to put art back into the game, his biggest challenge in 2019, the Cubs' sense of urgency and his thoughts about Matt Nagy and the Bears (:30).

Plus, we catch up with Cubs President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein, who discusses internal team leadership, whether or not the Cubs are close to a deal and how Maddon is changing up his coaching style (5:45).

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

Cubs Talk Podcast

Subscribe:

Where do Javy Baez and Anthony Rizzo fit in Cubs leadership equation?

Where do Javy Baez and Anthony Rizzo fit in Cubs leadership equation?

LAS VEGAS — All this talk about the Cubs' desire for more leadership on the roster has raised several questions and chief among them is wondering what it says about the core players already on the team.

If the Cubs have a leadership void — as Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer have said this month — does that mean players like Anthony Rizzo, Jason Heyward, Ben Zobrist and Javy Baez are not leaders?

Epstein confirmed Tuesday afternoon at the MLB Winter Meetings that the Cubs feel they have plenty of leadership on the roster, but they're looking more for that one guy — a veteran who has been around the block and isn't afraid to call somebody out or hold teammates accountable. The David Ross or Jon Jay mold, as Hoyer said Monday.

Rizzo is the face of the franchise and the driving force in the lineup every day, but he's still only 29 and developing as a leader. 

Heyward isn't real vocal, but when he does speak up, it carries a lot of weight — as the famous Rain Delay Speech indicates. 

Zobrist can talk hitting for hours and it's easy to see him becoming a coach whenever his playing career is done. But he isn't super vocal by nature, either.

Baez is an interesting case as he is quickly becoming an impactful leader for this team. In the process of putting up a huge breakout 2018 campaign that earned him a second-place finish in NL MVP voting, Baez became one of the most outspoken players in the dugout and clubhouse.

His instincts and baseball IQ are off the charts and he sees the game on a whole other level, which lends a different viewpoint to the squad. 

When the Cubs were handed a disappointing and abrupt early offseason, it was Baez that stood at his locker for nearly a half hour, ranting about how the team lacked urgency and an edge for most of the year.

Baez is starting to emerge as a true leader, but March 28, 2019 will only represent his third big-league Opening Day and he still has played in just 527 games at baseball's highest level.

"Javy is as respected as anyone in that clubhouse and is just starting to find his voice," Epstein said. "That's probably the next step for him — speaking up a little bit more. But by the way he plays the game, how much he cares about winning, how tough he is, he's got everyone's respect and attention."

Epstein said Rizzo is making it his personal mission to take his leadership to another level.

Epstein and Hoyer and the rest of the front office are taking responsibility for the "miscalculation" that the 2018 Cubs did not need — or have room on the roster — for one of those leaders.

Now they're trying to fix that for 2019 by attempting to add the right guy into the mix.

But what type of leader are the Cubs seeking?

"It's really certain leadership you need from the right bench guy who's not expecting a ton more playing time, who's content at where he is in his career — he's just completely invested in winning, invested in his teammates," Epstein said. "Those little difficult conversations that you have to have sometimes. Or bringing energy on a day where the everyday guys are dragging.

"That's an important role on a club, but please don't take it the wrong way that we think there's some deficiency with our position players. We have incredible guys and a lot of character there and some leaders — they're just continuing to grow into it."

What is it that Ross provided this club that they haven't been able to duplicate since he left?

Here's a perfect example:

"David was unusual, because Dave would grab guys walking off the field after a play," Joe Maddon said Tuesday. "And I would be entertained in my corner watching this whole thing unfold. I would address it afterwards. There's nothing wrong with that. I know that some of the guys were afraid to come in the dugout. And still that's OK, because they knew David was on their side.

"Yes, we want that. I would say that every team out here wants that and they're hard to find."