Cubs

Like it or not, Silvas got competition

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Like it or not, Silvas got competition

Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011Posted: 8:20 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

MESA, Ariz. Carlos Silva is a proud man, emotional and sometimes defensive. He doesnt understand why reporters keep asking him about this competition at the back end of the Cubs rotation.

Silva will turn 32 in April and he overlooks the way last season ended. He doesnt need to take anything for the heart procedure he underwent, and says his elbow is fine. Those health issues limited the 6-foot-4-inch, 280-pound right-hander to 5.1 innings combined last August and September.

I dont think its a reason to take me out of the rotation, but theyre the boss, Silva said Tuesday. Theyre the ones that make the decision. If I have to win my spot, Ill do it. I have no problem with that. (But) for me, theres only maybe one spot open, because I am one of the starters.

In Silvas mind, he is the pitcher who reached the 2010 All-Star break at 9-3 with a 3.45 ERA in 17 starts. He dismisses any concerns about his physical conditioning.

The only thing you need to do is put zeroes on the board and everybodys going to be happy, Silva said. Youre going to have perfect weight, the best-looking face. Youre the perfect guy. (It) was two-months-and-a-half like that.

Everybody cheered for Carlos. Something bad happened: Boom, you need to lose weight, you need to do this (and that).
Only in Chicago

Silva instantly grew close with pitching coach Larry Rothschild, who helped him clear his mind on the mound. Rothschild eventually left to take the same job with the New York Yankees, and a new pitching coach (Mark Riggins) is one X-factor in this search process.

Riggins was the St. Louis Cardinals minor-league pitching coordinator when they made Braden Looper the third overall pick in the 1996 draft. Looper is 36 now with graying hair. He disappeared last year when he didnt receive an offer he liked after making 34 starts and winning 14 games with a 5.22 ERA for the Milwaukee Brewers.

Looper lives in Chicagos south suburbs with his wife and three kids and eased toward retirement. He coached his son in Little League, and didnt watch much baseball, except for the two field trips his team took to White Sox games. His kids are in school, and in pitching for the Cubs he wouldnt have to completely uproot his family.

This was the one situation that worked out perfect, he said.

Looper, who has saved 103 games in his career, isnt inclined to return to the bullpen, nor is he looking to showcase himself for another team if it doesnt happen with the Cubs.

I prefer starting without a doubt, he said, but the best way I can put it is this is the one team (where) I would consider anything. Well just cross those bridges when we come to it.

Somebodys going to be disappointed

Mike Quades right in saying that. Heres what else we know: Andrew Cashner and James Russell will be stretched out, but could slide back into their bullpen roles if they dont stick as starters. Jeff Samardzija, who is out of minor-league options, is being ticketed for the bullpen. The rotation will most likely be five right-handers.

And the manager will place a premium on experience when evaluating the fourth and fifth starters.

So you shouldnt discount what Randy Wells has done the past two years, or the more than 1,200 innings Silva has thrown in his career. Not to mention the 6 million of Silvas 11.5 million salary the Cubs will have to pay this season. (The Seattle Mariners are picking up the rest of the tab as part of the Milton Bradley deal.)

Its realistic to take different pieces of a guys career, including his current health and status and performance in spring training, Quade said. But the balance probably is based more on what a guy has done at the major-league level in the past.

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

4 Cubs crack MLB Pipeline’s top 100 prospects list

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MiLB

4 Cubs crack MLB Pipeline’s top 100 prospects list

MLB Pipeline unveiled its annual top 100 prospects list on Saturday, and four Cubs minor leaguers made the cut.

Nico Hoerner (SS; No. 51), Brailyn Marquez (LHP; 68), Brennen Davis (OF; 78) and Miguel Amaya (C; 95) cracked the list for the North Siders. It’s the first time the Cubs have had four players on the list since 2016: Ian Happ (No. 21), Eloy Jimenez (23), Albert Almora Jr. (82) and Dylan Cease (98).

So yeah, it’s been a minute.

Cubs fans are most familiar with Hoerner; the 22-year-old made his big-league debut last September in an emergency spot after Javy Báez and Addison Russell got hurt. Hoerner hit .282/.305/.436 in 20 games and held his own defensively.

Hoerner is ranked as the No. 9 overall shortstop prospect, and he’ll get an opportunity to make the 2020 Opening Day roster. With Báez entrenched at shortstop, Hoerner will shift to second base and potentially play some center field, though he's still learning the latter.

Marquez, 20, is Pipeline’s No. 9 left-handed pitching prospect. The Cubs have struggled to develop homegrown starting pitching under Theo Epstein. In fact, Marquez is the first Cubs pitcher (LHP or RHP) to crack MLB Pipeline’s top 10 pitchers list during Epstein’s tenure on the North Side.

Marquez sported a 3.13 ERA and 1.30 WHIP in 22 starts between Single-A South Bend and advanced-A Myrtle Beach in 2019. The 20-year-old struck out 128 batters in 103 2/3 innings, walking 50.

Cubs senior director of player development Matt Dorey said the club has “really high expectations” for Marquez this season.

“Brailyn, his last half of last year in Myrtle was an epic run, just in terms of the raw stuff, the strikes, the breaking ball development,” Dorey said Sunday at Cubs Convention. “I think it’s a little early to decide where he’s going to start [the season], but I would guess Double-A.

“But I wanna see how he comes into camp — especially with our new pitching infrastructure — that we’re not missing anything with his delivery or anything from a pitch data perspective. We want to make sure that’s really tied before we send him out [for] a long, full season. It’s such a big year for him. But I think it would be foolish to put any cap on what he can do this year.”

Marquez allowed two earned runs or less in nine of his final 10 starts (he allowed three earned runs on Aug. 26 — the lone exception). The Cubs promoted him to Myrtle Beach on Aug. 6, where he posted a 1.71 ERA with 26 strikeouts and seven walks in five starts (26 1/3 innings).

The Cubs drafted Davis out of high school in 2018 (second round, No. 62 overall). The 20-year-old was more of a basketball player and had some Division I offers, but he ultimately signed with the Cubs and received a $1.1 million bonus.

Davis is considered to be a raw, athletic talent. He hit .305/.381/.525 with eight homers and a 160 wRC+ in 50 games with South Bend last season. He missed time after getting hit on the hand on two separate occasions.

Although Davis is listed as a center fielder (199 innings in 2019) he played left almost as frequently (193 2/3) in 2019. Pipeline projects him to make his big-league debut in 2022.

Amaya spent all of 2019 with Myrtle Beach, slashing .235/.351/.402 with a 122 wRC+ in 99 games. His defense has always been ahead of his bat, and he’s known to be an advanced catcher for his age.

The Cubs added Amaya to the 40-man roster in November in preparation for the Rule 5 Draft. However, he won’t make his big-league debut until 2021, at the earliest.

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Cubs agree to deal with free agent outfielder Steven Souza, per report

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USA TODAY

Cubs agree to deal with free agent outfielder Steven Souza, per report

The Cubs have made a roster move.

According to MLB.com's Mark Feinsand, the Cubs and outfielder Steven Souza have agreed to a one-year, big-league deal. The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal first reported Friday the two sides were nearing an agreement.

Souza, 30, missed the 2019 season after suffering a torn left ACL and LCL at the end of spring training. He also missed a chunk of 2018, playing 72 games while hitting the injured list on multiple occasions. The Diamondbacks non-tendered him last month.

Souza is a career .233/.323/.417 hitter with 70 home runs in five seasons. His best campaign came with the Rays in 2017: .239/.351/.459, 30 home runs, 78 RBIs and a 121 wRC+ — all career-bests, excluding his average. He sported a walk rate (13.6 percent) above league average (8.5) that season, though his strikeout rate (29 percent) was worse than average (23).

Signing Souza likely rules out a return of fan favorite outfielder Nicholas Castellanos. The Cubs have been linked to Castellanos throughout the offseason, but since they're looking to stay under MLB’s luxury tax threshold, re-signing Castellanos would require some financial maneuvering.

Souza has spent most of his career in right field (3,608 career innings) but has minimal experience playing center (33 1/3) and left (20). He’s above average in right (career 6 Defensive Runs Saved) and posted a career best 7 DRS in 2017.

The Cubs have a five-time Gold Glove right fielder in Jason Heyward, so Souza will see time at all three outfield spots. Heyward moved to center full-time last season after the Cubs acquired Castellanos and has played center at times throughout his career.

He's coming off a serious knee injury, but Souza is a low-risk, high-reward move for the Cubs. If he's healthy, he’ll add power to the middle of the order and add another bat to an outfield group with some question marks. Albert Almora Jr. and Ian Happ have each struggled offensively at times since 2018. Souza offers another option in case those two slump again, with room for a larger role.