Cubs

The money doesn't drive Alfonso Soriano

The money doesn't drive Alfonso Soriano

Sunday, April 24, 2011
Posted: 4:18 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

In your mind, there is only one number that defines Alfonso Soriano: 136 million. Its impossible to ignore.

Of course, Soriano drives luxury cars and wears fancy jewelry and enjoys all the trappings of being one of the richest men in the game. But the figure that really matters to him is 100 percent.

Soriano talks about it constantly, how strong his knees and his legs are now, and what that means to his overall game. He can move easily, side to side and front to back, across the outfield. Hes rediscovered better balance at home plate, and his mind isnt clouded by doubts about his health.

I feel like a different guy, Soriano said. I got my contract I could shut it down and not work and stay relaxed, but thats not me. I like to work. I like the game. I like to play good in the field. I never give up and try every day to be a better player.

Soriano will always be a reference point when a team does something like this: Last week the Milwaukee Brewers extended Ryan Braun through the 2020 season, when the outfielder will be approaching his 37th birthday.

Thats 145.5 million on top of the 45 million the Brewers already owed Braun through 2015, a huge bet on his character and that he will stay healthy and productive toward the end of his career.

The Cubs know that the 35-year-old Soriano is a flawed player who doesnt have the speed to steal 40 bases anymore. But they still expect him to be productive.

A few observers noticed that Soriano came to spring training with a little more muscle in his upper body. The offseason reports out of the teams academy in the Dominican Republic were that he dedicated himself to getting into better shape.

So far Sorianos on pace for around 30 home runs and 90 RBI, but knows all about his reputation as a streaky hitter, and wants to change that.

Thats what Im looking for this year, Soriano said. Im trying to be more consistent and not be hot for like one week, two weeks and (then) cool off for like one month. I dont want to be like that.

Soriano swears by hitting coach Rudy Jaramillo, and together theyve been trying to make a conscious effort to hit the ball to the opposite field more often.

Soriano has a clear idea of what he wants to do at the plate and a sharper focus once hes there. Three of his six homers have come with two strikes in the count, and 10 of his 14 RBI have come with two outs.

Yes, Soriano will stand at home plate and admire his shots, and that will always bother some fans. But hes old-school in how he looks after Starlin Castro, the same way the great Yankees Bernie Williams, Mariano Rivera used to take care of him.

Soriano certainly doesnt get all the credit when manager Mike Quade says something like this about Castro: Hes better in every aspect of his game.

But theres no doubt that Soriano has been influential, making the 21-year-old shortstop feel welcome and smoothing his adjustment to the big leagues. Theyre always playing catch or walking to the cage together.

I used to be 21, 22 years old. I want (Castro) to be the same guy he is now (in) 10 years, Soriano said. You got to work hard. (I) feel like I make the minimum now. I play hard. I like to play. I dont even think about what kind of money I make in this game.

But there are constant reminders, and maybe that will be part of Sorianos legacy, which probably wasnt part of the deal he signed in November 2006. But from here until the end of the 2014 season, he will catch extra fly balls and take extra swings and want to be in the lineup every day.

If I want to be a better player, I got to work, Soriano said. Its not coming from the sky.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Rob Manfred apologizes for tone-deaf comment about World Series trophy

Rob Manfred apologizes for tone-deaf comment about World Series trophy

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred made a tone-deaf comment over the weekend, and he apologized for it on Tuesday.

In an interview with ESPN, Manfred defended his decision not to punish Astros players for their involvement in Houston’s sign stealing scandal. Although MLB suspended (now former) Astros manager A.J. Hinch and general manager Jeff Luhnow and fined the club $5 million, players received immunity in the case. 

Some — like Cubs starter Yu Darvish — have called for Manfred to strip the Astros of their 2017 championship.

"The idea of an asterisk or asking for a piece of metal back seems like a futile act,” Manfred told ESPN’s Karl Ravech. “People will always know that something was different about the 2017 season, and whether we made that decision right or wrong, we undertook a thorough investigation, and had the intestinal fortitude to share the results of that investigation, even when those results were not very pretty."

Lol.

It’s one thing to let the Astros off with a mere slap on the wrist but degrading the value of a championship trophy — one which all players strive to secure one day — was purely ignorant by Manfred. 

RELATED: Jon Lester crushes Rob Manfred for devaluing World Series trophy 'quite significantly'

There was a more tactful way for Manfred to respond to the lack of punishment. He told Ravech the MLB Players Association likely would've filed grievances, had the league disciplined the players. That defense may not have totally sufficed, but it's far more reasonable than Manfred's piece of metal comment.

Yes, Manfred was looking to make a rhetorical point. But seemingly everyone in baseball is pissed at the lack of punishment for the Astros. Rather than put out the fire, Manfred and MLB have only doused it with kerosene. 

Jon Lester crushes Rob Manfred for devaluing World Series trophy 'quite significantly'

lester-806.jpg
USA Today

Jon Lester crushes Rob Manfred for devaluing World Series trophy 'quite significantly'

Add three-time World Series champion Jon Lester to the growing list of players who are pissed.

On Tuesday, Lester was asked about MLB commissioner Rob Manfred's comments regarding the reasoning behind MLB's lack of player punishment. Manfred recently spoke to ESPN about why he ultimately decided to not strip the organization of their 2017 title, saying that "The idea of an asterisk or asking for a piece of metal back seems like a futile act." 

Now, that didn't sit particularly well with players who won that piece of metal, mainly because, yeah, it's a stupid quote. Why not just call the Hall of Fame a house while you're at it, Rob? 

Anyways, Lester obviously took offense to the idea that the Commissioner's (lmaoo) Trophy was simply a piece of metal: 

That's somebody that's never played our game. You play for a reason. You play for that piece of metal. I'm very proud of the three that I have. I mean, if that's the way he feels, he needs to take his name of the trophy, you know? That's the first thing, when people walk into my house, if they've ever been to my house, I take them to where the trophies are. There they are. I'm proud of them. A lot of years, a lot of hard work. Then, just to bring it down like that, I mean, I'm sure it hurt a lot of guys when they saw that – especially guys that haven't won it that are striving for years to get it. I'm sure if Adam Dunn heard that – he played one playoff game – he'd probably be pretty upset. It's a very, very, special thing that he brought down quite significantly. 

Put aside the enormous flex that is Lester bringing all his house guests to the trophy case first – hell yeah, Jon – and you can tell that literally not a single player considers the trophy "a piece of metal."  Manfred will have a chance to backtrack on the like, half-dozen, dumb comments he's made when he talks with reporters in Arizona this afternoon. 

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