Cubs

Mooney: Cubs, Marmol agree to three-year deal

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Mooney: Cubs, Marmol agree to three-year deal

Monday, Feb. 14, 2011
Posted 1:36 p.m. Updated 4:35 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

MESA, Ariz The Cubs signed Carlos Marmol as a 16-year-old out of the Dominican Republic. It took three seasons before he was talked into converting from catcher. If they didnt know what they had then, they certainly do now.

Marmol signed a three-year, 20 million deal on Monday that avoids arbitration and buys out his first year of free agency. The 28-year-old closer could barely contain a huge smile at the beginning of a Fitch Park news conference.

I grew up in this organization. (Theyre) always here for me, Marmol said. When you trust yourself, you never know what youre going to be.

With his unpredictable slider, Marmol has emerged as a dominant force. He might have saved 50 games last year if he wasnt stuck on a sub-.500 team. He closed out 38 during his first full season on the job, posting a 15.99 strikeout ratio thats higher than any other pitcher in major-league history.

Marmol will be rewarded with an extension that breaks down like this: 3.2 million this season; 7 million the year after that; and 9.8 million in 2013.

It contains a limited no-trade clause and represents an upfront savings from the figure general manager Jim Hendry and agent Barry Praver would have otherwise settled on (4.7 million) before Tuesdays scheduled arbitration hearing.

Hendry values a closer who can handle Wrigley Fields big stage and withstand the pressures of playing in a large market.

It can be demoralizing if you blow a lot of games late, Hendry said. Hes certainly not afraid. Hes proven that. He can get out of jams, which most great closers have that ability. Hes approaching one of the best in the game. You can only go by asking the hitters in the National League who they like to face the least. And Id say a high percentage would probably start with him.

Marmols durable enough to have appeared in 238 games across the past three seasons. He can be wild hes walked 158 batters and hit 26 more during that time but also has the personality to be a closer.

The guys got very big you-know-what, Ted Lilly once said of Marmol.

Marmol loves playing in Chicago, and has put himself in position to become a free agent at the age of 31. If he continues to perform like an elite closer, he will receive an even bigger payday.

Hopefully I can sign a 10-year deal with Jim, Marmol said, sitting at a table next to the Cubs general manager. To which Hendry couldnt resist responding: Hope Im here to do it.

The bridge to Marmol

To get toward their closer, the Cubs will need left-handed reliever John Grabow, who will wear a knee brace as a precaution this season but doesnt have any limitations during camp.

Grabow pushed himself trying to live up to his contract, a two-year, 7.5 million deal that will expire at seasons end. His left knee didnt feel right, and an MRI ultimately revealed an MCL tear last August. He was shut down with a 7.36 ERA.

When theyre paying you to go out and pitch, you want (to) perform, Grabow said. After we started off so slow, youre just trying to catch up. Youre trying to pitch through an injury and things just got worse. If I look back now, I can probably learn from that. I have to listen to my body a little more.
Etc.

As insurance against an injury to Carlos Pena, manager Mike Quade said Tyler Colvin will get an extended look at first base this spring. The Cubs are thin at the position, and theres no better time to see whether the 25-year-old outfielder can handle it. Carlos Silva had a 103-degree fever and missed Mondays workout. Angel Guzman, who is recovering from a serious shoulder surgery, threw off the mound Monday. The Cubs are hopeful that the reliever will be able to throw a simulated game by the middle of March.

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

A series to forget: Facts and figures from Cubs' rough weekend in Cincinnati

A series to forget: Facts and figures from Cubs' rough weekend in Cincinnati

The Cubs and their fans may want to invent and use one of those Men In Black neuralyzers because the four-game series in Cincinnati was one to forget.

The Reds finished off a four-game sweep of the Cubs on Sunday with an 8-6 win. The way the Reds won the finale will be especially painful for the Cubs considering they led 6-1 after six innings. Mike Montgomery appeared to tire in the seventh inning and Pedro Strop got rocked out of the bullpen to lead to a seven-run seventh for the hosts.

The Reds have now won seven in a row and 10 of 12, but still sit 13 games under .500. Bizarrely, the Reds also swept the Dodgers, the Cubs’ next opponent, in a four-game series in May. Duane Underwood will start for the Cubs Monday against the Dodgers and make his major league debut.

Here are some other wild facts and figures from the series:

  • The last time the Reds swept the Cubs in a four-game series was back in 1983. That was the first week of the season and three weeks before the infamous Lee Elia rant.
  • One positive for the Cubs from the game was Montgomery’s start. Through six innings he allowed one run on three hits and two walks. However, he gave up a single, a double and a single in the seventh before Strop relieved him. Montgomery had gone six innings and allowed one run in each of his last four outings.
  • Strop was definitely a negative. On his first pitch, Strop gave up a home run to pinch-hitter Jesse Winker, the second home run for a Reds pinch-hitter in the game. Then Strop allowed a single, a walk, a single and a double before getting an out. Strop’s final line: 2/3 inning pitched, four runs, one strikeout, three walks, four hits.
  • The Cubs led in three of the four games this series, including two leads after five innings.
  • The Cubs were 5-for-23 (.217) with runners in scoring position in the series. On the season the Cubs are hitting .233 with RISP, which is 22nd in the majors and fourth-worst in the National League (but ahead of the division-rival Brewers and Cardinals).
  • The Reds outscored the Cubs 31-13 and scored at least six runs in every game. The Reds are now 6-3 against the Cubs this year after going a combined 17-40 against the Cubs from 2015-2017.

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 32nd homer in 1998

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 32nd homer in 1998

It's the 20th anniversary of the Summer of Sammy, when Sosa and Mark McGwire went toe-to-toe in one of the most exciting seasons in American sports history chasing after Roger Maris' home run record. All year, we're going to go homer-by-homer on Sosa's 66 longballs, with highlights and info about each. Enjoy.

Sosa victimized the Tigers pitching staff again on the next night, taking Brian Moehler deep in the 7th inning for a 400-foot solo blast.

The homer tied the game at 3, but the Cubs blew the lead in the bottom of the 7th when the Terrys (Adams and Mulholland) gave up 3 runs. The Cubs wound up losing 6-4.

The Cubs were putting together a really nice season in 1998 that ended with a trip to October. They entered the series with the Tigers with a 42-34 record, yet lost both games to a Detroit team that entered the series with a 28-45 record. The Tigers finished the season 65-94; the Cubs finished 90-73.

Fun fact: Luis Gonzalez was the Tigers left fielder and No. 5 hitter for both games of the series. He spent part of the 1995 season and all of '96 on Chicago's North Side. 1998 was his only year in Detroit before he moved on to Arizona, where he hit 57 homers in 2001 and helped the Diamondbacks to a World Series championship with that famous broken-bat single in Game 7.

Fun fact  No. 2: Remember Pedro Valdes? He only had a cup of coffee with the Cubs (9 games in 1996 and 14 in '98), but started in left field on June 25, 1998. He walked and went 0-for-1 before being removed from the game for a pinch-hitter (Jose Hernandez).