Cubs

Mooney: Marmol vows to live up to his contract

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Mooney: Marmol vows to live up to his contract

Tuesday, March 8, 2011
4:19 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Carlos Marmol knows that he is a target, because of where he plays and the nature of his work. The Cubs believe that hes perfectly suited for the job. The sellout crowds at Wrigley Field will hang on every slider.

I hate when they boo me. I really hate it, Marmol said. Yeah, I know, (its going to happen). But sometimes we dont deserve that, because were not perfect. Were going to make mistakes and blow a save.

(But) I like the energy of the fans. I like to be in that position. It makes me work a little more.

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This is Marmols first spring as an established closer. Kerry Wood is setting up for him now, and he has the security of a new 20 million deal. But he does not want you to think hes changed.

I concentrate (on) the season, Marmol said. I dont worry about money. I dont worry about anything else. He then cleared his throat and announced: I want to get another contract, man!

Marmol, 28, often punctuates his thoughts with laughter, like when he curses at a teammate in the middle of the clubhouse, or demands the 10-year Albert Pujols extension, or responds to a question about how many saves he thinks he can get this year.

Sixty! he joked.

That seems unreachable, but Marmol did save 38 of the Cubs 75 wins last season, when he would sometimes go weeks between chances. On a decent team with what looks like a much improved bullpen, its reasonable to think that he could approach 50 saves.

Marmol will be motivated because his three-year deal runs through 2013 and he is positioned to become a free agent at age 31. With his newfound wealth, hes planning to take out all the Latin players from the minor-league system for a nice dinner one night this month.

Who told you that? Marmol wondered.

Marmol wasnt broadcasting the information. He has humble roots. He was only a 16-year-old kid when he first signed with the Cubs out of the Dominican Republic. And eventually he had to be talked into converting from catcher.

Marmol can usually be found in the clubhouse with his chair tilted back, his legs leaning up against his locker. Closing here is not the same as in Kansas City or Miami or Pittsburgh.

Hes got a good makeup for his role, no doubt, Wood said. You dont really have a choice in that position. Youre going to be in there the next day. You got to be ready to go. Its easier said than done, but (you) got to be the same guy every day.

Across the past three years, Marmol has appeared in 82, 79 and 77 games. Since the start of the 2007 season, he leads all major-league relievers with 441 strikeouts and a .154 batting average against.

Hes a gamer, reliever John Grabow said. You never hear him complain. He takes the ball every day.

Since taking over as Cubs closer in August 2009, Marmol has converted 49 of 54 save opportunities, which translates to a 91 percent success rate.

After Marmols long-anticipated extension was announced on Feb. 14, Mike Quade walked into the media workroom at Fitch Park and said he didnt want any flowers: Was that a Valentines Day gift or what?

There are few greater comforts for a manager than a closer he trusts in the ninth inning. Sure, Marmol will walk some guys on the way to the 25th, 26th and 27th outs of the game. But that is also what makes him so dangerous, and keeps hitters off-balance.

We all know when hes locked in hes fun to watch, maybe more exciting than you want sometimes, Quade said. (But) I believed from Day 1 that contract status was not going to matter to him. Hes a young guy who loves to pitch and loves (getting) the ball. I just dont see that changing.

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Nationals fans sent Kyle Schwarber from hero to villain in monumentally entertaining Home Run Derby

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USA TODAY

Nationals fans sent Kyle Schwarber from hero to villain in monumentally entertaining Home Run Derby

WASHINGTON, D.C. — How could someone like Kyle Schwarber play the villain?

The fan favorite who’s always quick with a smile — or an Uncle Sam costume on the Fourth of July — Schwarber doesn’t fit the mold of a loathsome target of boos. But he made quite the heel turn in the minds of Washington Nationals fans Monday night, and of course he knew it was coming.

Schwarber went from getting cheered by the legions in attendance at the Home Run Derby to getting booed when he took on, and eventually lost to, hometown hero Bryce Harper in the final round.

“I was down in the tunnel saying, ‘If we get to the finals, Harp, they’re all going to be against me. I think they’re all going to be against me,’” Schwarber said Monday night. “And then I went out there and got booed after they all got pumped up for me. That’s just the beauty of it, and I was happy for Bryce that he won it in front of the home crowd.”

Harper delivered an incredibly memorable baseball moment Monday night, catching up to Schwarber’s 18 home runs with a ridiculous display of repetitive power to win a Home Run Derby for the ages. The format of this event, revamped a couple years ago, made for a dramatic and hugely entertaining evening. Harper smacked nine homers over the final 47 seconds of the final round to tie Schwarber, then bested him in bonus time. Unsurprisingly, the home crowd was going ballistic for their boy.

But earlier in the night, it was Schwarber getting all the cheers, when he made his own last-second comeback to beat Philadelphia Phillies slugger Rhys Hoskins in the second round. Schwarber was pumping up the crowd, pumping his fists and screaming while putting on a show of his own to catch and pass Hoskins' 20 home runs and advance to the finals.

How quickly the locals forgot.

By the finals — during which Schwarber looked understandably exhausted — the crowd had turned on him, trying to get every advantage for Harper.

“As soon as I got done with that round, I told myself that he had it,” Schwarber said. “I knew that he had the home crowd behind him, and I knew that he was a very prolific power hitter with a great swing. For him to come in and do that and started getting down to the wire, all of a sudden he started racking them up one at a time. You kind of just accept your fate there.”

Perhaps the night could’ve ended differently for Schwarber had he listened more closely to the advice of his teammates, Javy Baez and Willson Contreras, who were quick with Gatorade, a towel and words of encouragement on Monday. Baez hit 16 home runs in his own first-round appearance, though Los Angeles Dodgers slugger Max Muncy knocked him out.

“I was just telling him to slow down,” Baez said. “He was kind of rushing a little bit, that’s why he was jumping to the ball.”

“They were actually giving me really good advice that I didn’t take because I was really dumb-headed,” Schwarber said. “‘Make sure you take some pitches and get the pitch that you want.’ At the end, I felt like I was swinging at everything. I was just running out of gas. I felt like I had to put up as many swings just to try to put a couple out.”

Schwarber was totally content with losing out to Harper’s home-field advantage. Though as his homers flew out deep into the right-field seats Monday night, you couldn’t help but wonder what it would be like if Schwarber was instead taking aim at Sheffield Avenue and getting his own home-field advantage from Cubs fans.

The North Side hasn’t played host to the All-Star Game since 1990, so perhaps Schwarber will still be slugging the next time the Friendly Confines are the site of the Home Run Derby.

“That’d be really cool one day if the All-Star Game’s at Wrigley,” Schwarber said, “and to participate in the Derby, that’d be fun.”

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 36th homer in 1998

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AP

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 36th homer in 1998

It's the 20th anniversary of the Summer of Sammy, when Sosa and Mark McGwire went toe-to-toe in one of the most exciting seasons in American sports history chasing after Roger Maris' home run record. All year, we're going to go homer-by-homer on Sosa's 66 longballs, with highlights and info about each. Enjoy.

 

Sosa went down and golfed a pitch out for his 36th homer on July 17, 1998. He smacked Marlins reliever Kirt Ojala's (who??) pitch just over the wall in center field at Pro Player Stadium for a 2-run shot that closed out the Cubs' scoring in a 6-1 victory.

 

The blast accounted for Sosa's 88th and 89th of the season. By comparison, Javy Baez currently leads the Cubs (and the National League) with 72 RBI on July 17, 2018.

 

Steve Trachsel tossed a complete game for the Cubs in the victory that day and Sosa finished with the only extra-base hits for either team (he also had a double).

 

Fun fact: Former Cub Ryan Dempster started the game for the Marlins, but lasted just 4.1 innings to run his season record to 1-4 with a 6.70 ERA.