Cubs

Mooney: The Zen of Carlos Zambrano

Mooney: The Zen of Carlos Zambrano

Tuesday, March 8, 2011Posted: 6:40 PM
By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Are you a new man? You are asking the wrong question, Carlos Zambrano says.

Has the anger-management counseling helped? Yes, Zambrano says without much hesitation.

Zambrano sees a fundamental difference between those two ideas. Thats how hes framed the maturity issues that have too often sabotaged the Cubs.

Of course, all this is much easier to say on March 8 during the middle of yet another meaningless exhibition game.

But Zambrano pitched well again in Tuesdays 4-0 loss to the Colorado Rockies. Just as important, he virtually ignored the shaky defense behind him at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick.

I have to do my job, Zambrano said. I dont worry about anybody (else). This year I want to concentrate on what I can do. I dont want to worry about left field, center field, whatever. I want to worry about whats going on at the mound.

Zambrano does not want to change his entire personality. Family is central to his life and he has a good sense of humor, recently joking that he was cured and received approval from the psychologist to be alone by himself.

But Zambrano would like to remake his image. He openly acknowledges that he needs to better control the emotions churning inside. Hes got to the point where he felt comfortable exchanging text messages with Carlos Silva after Mondays brutal start.

The two are good friends, but they had pretty much avoided discussing any similarities between their disputes with Derrek Lee and Aramis Ramirez.

I told (Silva) to relax and just be the same guy that he was in Minnesota, Zambrano said. Dont let anything affect your preparation for the season.

Whoever needs a little bit of support or tips Ill be there for anybody.

Mike Quade will back Zambrano because he needs another front-line starter. The manager owes a lot to Zambranos 8-0 finish to 2010.

Im aware of everything that happened in 19-whatever with this organization, but none of it applies this time, Quade said. Im here every day living in this moment and looking forward and not looking back. (Hes been) fantastic this spring. He was really good for us and for me last year at the end of the season. So theres no reason for me to look anywhere but at that.

Its not unique to Z. When things come up, you deal with it. But I certainly dont sit around going: Are things going to get crazy? When? No, Im just happy when things are smooth. And when theyre not, we deal with them and move on.

Zambrano, who had mentioned that his right arm felt tired after his last start, said that physically hes back to normal. He lasted three innings, scattered five hits and allowed his first run of the spring.

The Cubs werent charged with any errors on Tuesday, but they again showed that defense will be an ongoing issue. Blake DeWitt had trouble handling two balls at second. Scott Moore had to make two nifty plays at first off wild throws. One ball bounced in front of a charging Tyler Colvin in left.

It wont matter as much when Zambrano throws like this: Carlos Gonzalez got so tangled up on one check swing that he struck out and fell into the dirt, flat on his stomach.

The Rockies slugger hit 34 homers and drove in 117 runs last season, and Zambrano correctly quoted his average (.336) off the top of his head.

We cant give up to big hitters, Zambrano said. I have my best stuff for them.

At the end of the third inning, Zambrano walked off the mound and past Quade, who was sitting on a cooler. They locked hands. Their high-five turned into a kind of extended handshake. At that moment it all looked good in the Cubs dugout.

Changed man? Zambrano said afterward, repeating the question. No, Im the same.

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs still searching for answers for Tyler Chatwood's puzzling control issues

Cubs still searching for answers for Tyler Chatwood's puzzling control issues

Tyler Chatwood looked to be turning the corner with his control issues, but alas, he and the Cubs aren't so lucky.

After walking only two batters in a solid start in Atlanta last week, Chatwood had taken a big step in the right direction. It was, after all, only the third time he'd walked fewer than 5 batters in an outing this season.

Those control woes reared their ugly heads once again Tuesday night at Wrigley Field in a 10-1 loss to the Indians. Chatwood walked 6 batters and managed to net only 8 outs, getting hammered for 4 runs in the third inning.

"Ugh, it was tough," Maddon said. "The stuff was so good, we just couldn't get a strike."

"It's definitely frustrating," Chatwood said, "because one at-bat, I'll feel really good and the next one, I feel like I'm fighting myself.

"Last time [out], I was able to stay in the rhythm. Tonight, I was kinda battling, rushing rather than staying back, so it's just keeping that feeling and maintaining that."

His season ERA is only 3.74, which looks good until you consider his WHIP is 1.62 and he's walked 40 batters in 45.2 innings with only 41 strikeouts in the process. He now leads baseball in walks per 9 innings.

Chatwood said earlier this month in St. Louis that he's figured out what has led to the startling lack of control and while he didn't elaborate on the mechanical issue, he was working hard at correcting the problem in bullpens.

He's also used the term "fighting myself" at least a dozen times this month alone and it's become a common refrain for his explanation of what's going on. 

"He's got a busy delivery when he throws the baseball," Maddon said. "He's kinda busy what he does with his hands. It's not like he can just change it easily because that's how his arm works, how his body works.

"Sometimes, like you see him the other day, everything's on time and how good it can be and when it's out of sorts a bit, then all of the sudden it becomes shotgun. Ah man, you can see the movement [on his pitches] from the side, how good it is. 

"We gotta harness it somehow. I spoke to him briefly on the bench; I reassured him it's gonna be fine, it's gonna be really good by the end of the year. We gotta figure it out and he knows that. But man, that's good stuff. We just gotta get it in the zone."

Chatwood also admitted part of the problem is mental in that he's trying to force pitches rather than trusting his stuff. He's also gotten into the bad habit of drifting down the mound, though he's not sure when or where he picked up that hitch in his delivery.

Chatwood and Cubs pitching coach Jim Hickey are working on slowing his delivery down to get his arm in the same spot on a more consistent basis.

When the Cubs signed Chatwood over the winter, it was easy to see why.

He just turned 28 in December, his peripherals and a move from hitter-friendly Coors Field foretold a potential leap in performance and his stuff is nasty. Plus, he signed a three-year deal at a relative bargain of $38 million.

Once the Cubs signed Yu Darvish in spring training, you could make the case that Chatwood could be among the best No. 5 starters in baseball.

Nine starts later, the honeymoon period is well over with Chatwood, as he threw only 30 of his 74 pitches for strikes Tuesday night and sent catcher Willson Contreras sailing all around home plate for pitches way out of the zone.

Still, it's clear to see there is some intriguing talent there and the season there is roughly 70 percent of the season remaining before the Cubs make what they hope is another run at the World Series.

"I have a lot of faith," Maddon said. "I know we're gonna reap the rewards, the benefits as he figures this thing out."

Baseball Night in Chicago Podcast: Marlon Byrd discusses his suspensions for PED use and Ozzie Guillen offers a solution to the PED problem

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NBC Sports Chicago

Baseball Night in Chicago Podcast: Marlon Byrd discusses his suspensions for PED use and Ozzie Guillen offers a solution to the PED problem

Ozzie Guillen explains why he thinks Manny Machado is a better fit for the Cubs than the White Sox. Plus, Guillen and Marlon Byrd react to 19-year-old Juan Soto hitting a homer in his first at-bat with the Nationals.

Later in the show the guys debate who had the better rants in front of the media: Guillen or Byrd?

Finally, Byrd opens up about his PED suspensions, relates to the guys caught using PEDs now and Guillen offers up a solution to rid baseball of PEDs entirely.

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below: