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Next battle between Cubs, Red Sox could be over managers

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Next battle between Cubs, Red Sox could be over managers

Updated: Thursday, Nov. 3, 11:45 p.m.

The Cubs and Red Sox still havent decided what Theo Epstein is worth, and it doesnt sound like theyve made much progress on settling the compensation. The next battle between these two historic franchises could be over a manager.

Epstein had to start thinking about candidates on Sept. 30, once it became official that Terry Francona wouldnt be returning to the Red Sox.

Epstein continued doing background work with his eventual replacement general manager Ben Cherington even after he decided to jump to the Cubs and both sides negotiated to break the final year of his contract.

Once Epstein fired Mike Quade, theyd be working from similar lists. Phillies bench coach Pete Mackanin a Brother Rice High School graduate who already interviewed at Fenway Park will do the same on Friday at Wrigley Field.

The Cubs and Red Sox have also received permission to interview Mike Maddux, which will probably happen next week, once the Rangers pitching coach recovers from laryngitis.

I dont think either organization is going to defer to the other, Epstein said Thursday. Its the responsibility for us to get the right person for the Cubs, and for Ben to get the right person for the Red Sox. Im not sure thats going to be the same person: Different markets, organizations are in a different place right now.

Epstein spoke with Francona on Thursday and theyve remained in contact since the end of the season. Thats the bond they formed after winning two World Series titles together.

Epstein knows Francona so well like the back of my hand that they wouldnt need a formal interview. Francona could be in play for the Cardinals job.

Clearly, he would be at the top of anybodys list as far as available managers, Epstein said. Thats true of any organization. If we were to look at it and say: Whos somebody with experience? Whos a proven winner? Whod be a real asset? Hes got to be at or very close to the top of the list.

Its got to be the right fit here. Im not sure it is, and Titos not sure it is. But we have a relationship that transcends the professional side of things, so weve stayed in touch.

Epstein has already brought in Jed Hoyer and Jason McLeod, two executives with a Red Sox connection. Along with assistant general manager Randy Bush, they will bring a candidate to chairman Tom Ricketts and his family.

This doesnt need to be The Boston Show recreated in Chicago, Epstein said. For my growth as an executive, maybe its the right thing to work with a new manager. For Titos growth as a manager, maybe it will be better for him to work with a new boss.

You dont want to live in the past.

The Cubs are not believed to be pursuing any current big-league managers, which would eliminate Joe Maddon (Rays), John Farrell (Blue Jays) and Bud Black (Padres).

Brewers hitting coach Dale Sveum, who already interviewed in Boston, will be in the mix. Sources said bench coaches DeMarlo Hale (Red Sox), Sandy Alomar Jr. (Indians) and Dave Martinez (Rays) also could be involved in the search.

The past will guide Epstein in this sense: The Cubs will use a screening process similar to the one that revealed Francona and runner-up Maddon after the 2003 season.

Beginning with Mackanin, candidates will sit down for a traditional interview. But they will also likely have to do game simulations. Afterward, theyll meet with reporters, to see how they handle the media in a big market.

Back in 2003, someone like Francona might have been handed statistics, lineup cards and a history of bullpen usage. The game would be paused at a key situation, like first and third, one out in a late inning. Given whos available in the bullpen, and knowing whos available to pinch-hit, theyd be asked: What would you do in this situation?

We try to create some intensity, Epstein said. So we got right in his face and asked for an answer pretty quickly. We werent looking so much at what the managerial candidate said in terms of the strategy that he would employ. But what pieces of information he would use, what his thought process would be in trying to make a decision.

So even if the Cubs and Red Sox dont zero in on the same manager, their searches will almost certainly have a similar look and feel. Both are moving faster than the Epstein compensation negotiations.

Javy Baez can see the future

Javy Baez can see the future

Javy Baez doesn't have the words to describe Javy Baez.

But then again, that's not what he does.

Analytical breakdowns aren't his game — incredible, heart-stopping physical feats on the baseball diamond are.

On a night at Wrigley Field that felt like one of the October battles of the past between the Cubs and Dodgers, Baez once again wowed and awed.

It wasn't just that ridiculous juke move at first base, though that will undoubtedly go down as one of the top MLB highlights of the year — if not THE top highlight. 

During Tuesday night's 7-2 Cubs win, Baez turned five different ground balls into outs...from the outfield grass. One such play nabbed Cody Bellinger by a split second at first base to end a bases-loaded threat in the eighth inning. 

And there was his seventh homer of the season — his first at home, surprisingly — to give the Cubs some more breathing room as he continues to hit the ball with authority the other way. He now has 15 hits in his last 33 at-bats and 9 of those knocks have gone for extra bases (5 doubles, 3 homers and a triple). 

But back to that play at first base — how did he do it?

After pausing for a few seconds, Baez shrugged and said, "I don't know," before trying to find the words to explain what was going through his head in those few seconds as he was hurtling down the basepath:

"I just saw him really close to the line," Baez said. "Usually on that play, you go around [the base] like it's a base hit. I think if I would've kept going, he was going to run me over because he's a big dude. 

"I saw a play — Billy Hamilton did it like 3 or 4 years ago. I saw it and that was the first thing that came to my mind — to stop or see a reaction and he couldn't stop. I know I didn't leave the line. It was everything good."

It's the last part that's most amazing. 

Here's the play Baez was referencing, from July 11, 2014:

So as he's running down to first base, he has the wherewithal to dip into his encyclopedic cache, pluck out the perfect play from his memory and execute it in glorious fashion...all in a matter of maybe a second-and-a-half.

"I think we all feel his energy all around the place — not only on the field, but in the clubhouse," catcher Willson Contreras said. "We call him The Mago for a reason. I love this guy. To me, he has the best instincts in the game. What he did today was just awesome. That's one of the best base hits ever."

Joe Maddon said he and the Cubs coaches were comparing Baez to legendary Bears running back Gale Sayers in the dugout for that juke move.

"That's him playing on a playground in Puerto Rico somewhere," Maddon said. "That's what I love about him. There's no fear in his game. His game is a game and he sees things in advance and he's fearless. He could strike out three or four times in a row and that is not going to impact his fifth at-bat."

Just about every week throughout the season, Baez shows the baseball world something it's never seen before. 

From his lightning quick tags to his swim move slides to hitting bombs left-handed during batting practice to his rocket arm that has been clocked as high as 98 mph on the infield — even he has to surprise himself every now and then, right? Especially like this play Tuesday night?

"Nah, not really," he said, smirking. "I think if it's in your mind, it's possible. I see a lot of things that people can do and they don't realize it. I realize everything I can do and everything I can't do."

If you ever want to know what makes Baez "El Mago," read that last sentence again:

"I realize everything I can do and everything I can't do."

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Jose Quintana continued his strong run in a dominant 7-inning performance against the Dodgers

Jose Quintana continued his strong run in a dominant 7-inning performance against the Dodgers

During the 4th inning of the Cubs’ 7-2 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers on Tuesday night, LA right fielder Cody Bellinger took a 92 mile per hour fastball from Jose Quintana and sent it right back his way at 96: 

After a quick (maybe unintentional?) grab, Quintana calmly tossed the ball in his glove a few times before walking off the mound without even a grimace.

It was just that kind of night for Quintana, who pitched 7 strong innings while allowing only two runs on four hits and striking out seven. He’s now gone seven innings in three straight starts, all Cubs wins - two of which were against teams that currently sit in 1st place.

“We needed that kind of performance tonight,” Manager Joe Maddon said after the game. “They have a very difficult lineup to navigate and he was once again on top of his game. Great focus - he kept coming back with good pitches. Really the curveball was very pertinent tonight and then he had some good changeups to go with the fastball. He’s pitching.”

Quintana flashed an impressive amount of control while working through one of baseball’s toughest lineups. After walking six batters through his first two starts, Quintana has now only walked three since. 71 of his 114 pitches -- the most thrown by any Cubs pitcher this season, per team notes -- went for strikes. 

“I feel great,” he said after the game. “I know I’ve been throwing the ball really well the last couple of starts. All my stuff’s worked really good.”

“This year he’s been really good,” Willson Contreras added. “He’s using all his pitches which he didn’t do last year very often. I think he has his mind in the right place right now, and we’re in a good place.”

Quintana’s offspeed repertoire was firmly on display all night. Per Statcast, after throwing two changeups to Dodgers leadoff hitter Enrique Hernandez, he didn’t show the pitch again until the 4th. On the night, he threw the change up 12 times; the Dodgers failed to put a single one in play. 

“We’ve been in these types of situations and conversations since Spring Training,” Contreras added. “I saw him working out his change up in [there], which is good. He was a little harder than 84, but today I think was one of the best games he threw with the change up.”

Through 28 innings pitched this season, the lefty now sports a sub-3 FIP (2.89) and is striking out over 11 batters per nine innings. Some pitchers that have a higher FIP include David Price, Jacob deGrom and Stephen Strasburg. 

“He’s absolutely pitching right now,” Maddon added. “Where in the past I thought he would just pretty much rely on his fastball. He’s becoming a pitch maker.”