Cubs

Plesac, Glanville out; Deshaies in the mix for Cubs TV job

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Plesac, Glanville out; Deshaies in the mix for Cubs TV job

Updated: 9:10 p.m.

The Cubs could go in several different directions and find their next voice for the broadcast booth. It wont become the existential crisis that was the American League MVP debate Miguel Cabrera vs. Mike Trout but whoever is hired to replace Bob Brenly will generate strong reactions from the fans.

The search process led by WGN continues, and you can add at least one more name to the list: Jim Deshaies. Sources confirmed the longtime Houston Astros color analyst recently interviewed for the job.

Another source said that Dan Plesac who was viewed as a frontrunner informed WGN on Friday that hes withdrawing from consideration and will remain at the MLB Network.

Judging by the messages across Twitter, Doug Glanville definitely appealed to a certain demographic. Heres a University of Pennsylvania graduate, a gifted writer for The New York Times who gets social media and has a three-dimensional view of the game.

Contact was made, but the two sides never had a sit-down. Theres an extension with ESPN in the works, according to a source close to Glanville, so cross him off the list.

The X-factor is what happens when WGNs contract expires after the 2014 season and the Cubs look to cash in on the local television deals that have fundamentally changed the baseball economy.

Earlier this month, sources identified five contenders who were targeted for interviews: Plesac; Rick Sutcliffe; Eric Karros; Gary Matthews; and Todd Hollandsworth.

Sutcliffe is under contract at ESPN and viewed as a long shot given his high profile. Karros has a broad television portfolio, working nationally on Fox and around Los Angeles Dodgers local broadcasts.

Sarge has done the job before, calling games for the Philadelphia Phillies. Hollandsworth, who has occasionally filled in for Brenly, is the pre- and postgame analyst on Comcast SportsNet, which will have some input along with the Cubs and WGN.

With these ex-Cubs believed to be in play, its worth noting that Brenly was a relative outsider when he replaced Steve Stone. Brenly played almost his entire career with the San Francisco Giants and returned to their coaching staff after spending two seasons in the WGN radio booth with Harry Caray and Thom Brennaman.

Brenly lasted eight seasons alongside play-by-play man Len Kasper before the Arizona Diamondbacks made what sounded like an offer he couldnt refuse. The two had developed a strong chemistry, even when the on-field product was barely watchable.

Brenly accepted the new job in October and went back to his home in the desert. Nothings imminent his replacement might not be named for a few more weeks.

Deshaies never played for the Cubs, but one rave review described a broadcasting style that sounded Brenly-esque. Heres what the Houston Press wrote in its Best of section for 2008, naming the citys best commentator:

Jim Deshaies had some tough shoes to fill when he took over the Astros analyst spot from Larry Dierker. But lets just say, as J.D. settles into his second decade as the Astros TV analyst, that he has not only surpassed Dierker, he has perhaps surpassed every other analyst in baseball. The former starting pitcher knows the ins and outs of the game, from pitching to hitting to fielding to strategy.

Best of all, hes not a homer, and if the good guys goof up, hell let you know how and why. And then theres his quick wit and his ability to throw out a Seinfeld reference or obscure pop culture trivia at a moments notice. Nothing gets past Deshaies, and, if you pay attention, youll learn more from him than just about any baseball geek in the country.

Within the past 13 months or so, the Astros have transitioned to a new ownership group and a new front office, and they will be moving to a new league and a new television home, switching from Fox Sports Houston to the recently launched CSN Houston.

On Oct. 3 at Wrigley Field, a 101-loss Cubs team beat a 107-loss Astros team, mercifully ending their seasons. That day, the Houston Chronicle reported that Deshaies is expected back next season. Stay tuned.

Why Andy Green is such an important part of the Cubs coaching calculus

Why Andy Green is such an important part of the Cubs coaching calculus

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — On the day he was introduced as the next Cubs manager, David Ross made it a point to explain how important it is that his bench coach is "one step ahead" of him as he gets his feet under him.

Theo Epstein echoed that sentiment, saying a bench coach with managerial experience was vital as the Cubs help Ross along as not only a first-year manager, but also a first year coach.

Enter Andy Green.

The 42-year-old Green spent the last four seasons as the San Diego Padres manager, but was fired with one week left in the 2019 season and two years left on his current deal. The Padres wanted a different voice moving into the future after Green compiled a 274-366 record and lost at least 85 games each season, finishing no higher than fourth place in the National League West.

But the Cubs don't want Green to be the manager and they love what he brings to the table as a veteran coach and Ross' right-hand man. 

"Talking to the Padre guys that I know well, he has excellent in-game strategy and always thought ahead very well in-game," Cubs GM Jed Hoyer said Tuesday. "Very bright, very well prepared. And that's not to mention he's a really good coach. We felt like that was a really good pairing for David. He hasn't managed, so having a guy next to him that, by all accounts, was really good in-game and controls information well, I think that's a really nice pairing."

At his introductory presser, Ross acknowledged his weaknesses as a first-time manager and admitted he will need some time to get the "feel" back of being in the dugout and engaged in each pitch after serving as either a broadcaster or front office executive for the last three years.

As a player, Ross often tried to think and strategize along with his manager, but that's not the same as actually having to make those calls and worry about pitching changes, pinch-hitting, umpire challenges and any other in-game duties a manger is tasked with. It can all add up quickly and managers often have to make the crucial decisions at the snap of a finger.

Ross and Green have not worked together, but the Cubs are hoping they can form a fast friendship and believe Green's ability to prepare is also an asset along with his experience. 

"He's gonna be great at [the bench coach job]," Padres GM A.J. Preller said. "I think it's gonna be a really good thing for somebody that's in that [manager's] chair for the first time having somebody that's gonna be knowledgeable, prepared, detail-oriented and somebody that understands what it's like to sit in that seat. I think all those things are gonna help serve [Green] really well."

Preller and Green reportedly didn't always see eye-to-eye in the big picture view of where the Padres were going, but there's no denying how the San Diego GM feels about his former manager's intellect and the Cubs won't need him to call the shots — only to assist Ross in doing so.

"Andy is probably one of the most intelligent baseball people I've been around," Preller said. "To me, probably as good a person as I've been around as far as Xs and Os and knowing the game. Andy always seemed to be two or three steps ahead. He's very well thought out, very well prepared. It's gonna be a huge strength for him and I think it will be nice for a first-year manager to have somebody like Andy sitting next to him."

A bench coach's exact duties vary from team to team and manager to manager, but with the Cubs, they will lean on Green initially to help Ross along with the experience aspect, making sure the game is not too quick for the first-year manager. During games, Green will be standing right next to Ross, weighing decisions and options along with pitching coach Tommy Hottovy.

But like other bench coaches, Green will also be tasked with helping to serve as a bridge between Ross and the Cubs players. In a lot of ways, Ross is the face of the franchise, as he will partake in somewhere around 500 media sessions throughout the course of the season, including before and after each game. Between that, addressing the team as a group, individual meetings with players and all the strategy and discussions with the R & D department and the front office, Ross will need to lean on Green to be his right-hand man off the field, as well.

It helps that Green just finished managing in the National League, where he knows the opponents and the game is quite different than the American League, which has the benefit of the designated hitter.

"He's a guy that understands all different aspects [of being a coach]," Preller said. "He understands some of the newer information, some of the newer technology. He's gonna understand things that have worked in the past in terms of preparing for games from an advanced information standpoint and then he'll draw upon his experiences being in the National League, knowing the league really well.

"I think he'll be able to give all those things to David Ross and to the Cubs players — somebody who comes in with the mindset of just trying to help the team out and help the team grow. All those things are going to be positives."

We'll see how quickly Ross and Green can jell together, but it's clear the Cubs believe Green can help expediate the process of preparation and in-game strategy for Ross, both now and in-season. 

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Cubs Talk Podcast: Ned Colletti interview

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USA TODAY

Cubs Talk Podcast: Ned Colletti interview

On the latest Cubs Talk Podcast, David Kaplan talks with former Cubs front office executive and Dodgers GM Ned Colletti on how to fix a major league roster, when to deal a player who is heading into free agency, and more

01:30 How he moved from MLB to being a scout in the NHL

04:30 How to fix a major league roster

06:40 On building the roster when other teams know your weaknesses

09:30 When to deal a player who is facing free agency

11:30 Balancing trying to win now vs. building a team for a sustained run

14:30 On how a GM can't depend only on signing a big free agent

18:00 On his time with the Cubs in the 1980s

19:45 On how a GM deals with Scott Boras

22:00 On how a GM deals with talk radio and the media

26:00 On how he almost got CC Sabathia on the Dodgers for 2008 playoff run

28:00 On how not trading for Ryan Dempster helped bring Kyle Hendricks to the Cubs

Listen to the full podcast here or via the embedded player below:

Cubs Talk Podcast

Subscribe:

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